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RNA vaccines rose to prominence during COVID but we've only scratched the surface of their potential


psyche101
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RNA vaccines rose to prominence during COVID, but we've only scratched the surface of their potential

The real power of microRNA lies in its ability to control multiple molecules at once.

This makes it particularly attractive for use as a therapeutic for complex diseases such as cancer and neurological diseases.

Essentially, microRNA controls entire biological pathways rather than single molecules.

To explain, imagine the streets in your neighbourhood represent a complex web of biological pathways, and the houses on the streets represent individual molecules.

One street has a problem that is affecting every house (or molecules).

A "traditional" drug would try to fix just one of the houses in the hope that this would help the overall integrity of the street.

But a drug that uses microRNA — either by increasing or inhibiting its function — could fix the majority of houses on the street at the same time.

This approach is what Viridian Therapeutics (formerly known as miRagen Therapeutics) tried to address when developing a drug to block a specific microRNA known as microRNA-155.

MicroRNA-155 has been heavily implicated in tumours and the progression of lymphoma and leukemia, as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Their drug, which made it to stage 2 clinical trials but didn't progress due to commercial reasons, actively stopped the activity of this microRNA, leading to alleviation of symptoms with these cancers.

This is just one example of the many microRNA based therapeutics currently in phase one and two clinical trials for a wide range of complex diseases.

 

mRNA being new is a very misunderstood process from what I gather in general.

It's not new.

It's not dangerous.

It's a new field that could have wide reaching implications regarding many life threatening ailments. As the article indicates it's potential is exciting.

Will those people who oppose it now still be opposing mRNA if it cures cancer? 

Edited by psyche101
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  • The title was changed to RNA vaccines rose to prominence during COVID but we've only scratched the surface of their potential
 

Another great thing about mRNA is that it can be manufactured easily by today's technology. Not long ago the sequencing of the human genome was an amazing effort. Now DNA and RNA can be assembled by machines that build up sequences according to a blueprint.

 

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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/how-they-work.html?s_cid=11347:%2BmRNA %2Bvaccines:sem.b:p:RG:GM:gen:PTN:FY21

Quote

mRNA vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna)

To trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, mRNA vaccines use mRNA created in a laboratory to teach our cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. This immune response, which produces antibodies, is what helps protect us from getting sick from that germ in the future.

Quote

Research for mRNA technology

Researchers have been studying and working with mRNA vaccines for decades.

  • In fact, mRNA vaccines have been studied before for flu, Zika, rabies, and cytomegalovirus (CMV).
  • Beyond vaccines, cancer research has also used mRNA to trigger the immune system to target specific cancer cells.

 

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https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36371169/

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Although effective vaccines have long existed, current vaccines take both time and cost to produce. Messenger RNA (mRNA) technology is an emergent vaccine platform that supports rapid vaccine development on a large scale. Here, an optimized mRNA vaccine construct (LVRNA001) expressing rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) was developed in vitro and then evaluated in vivo for its immunogenicity and protective capacity in mice and dogs.

And that is what is important in health care, new technologies such as mRNA vaccines that allows for rapid development and production of vaccines.

 

Notice that study is 3 years before COVID-19 hit the world.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28754494/

Quote

Vaccines based on mRNA coding for antigens have been shown to be safe and immunogenic in preclinical models. We aimed to report results of the first-in-human proof-of-concept clinical trial in healthy adults of a prophylactic mRNA-based vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein (CV7201).

 

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On 11/26/2022 at 8:19 AM, stereologist said:

Another great thing about mRNA is that it can be manufactured easily by today's technology. Not long ago the sequencing of the human genome was an amazing effort. Now DNA and RNA can be assembled by machines that build up sequences according to a blueprint.

 

The question I have is why does the vaccine have to be kept at such a cold temperature as opposed to the non mRNA vaccines?   That is a failing in my opinion, required a lot of hospitals and facilities to upgrade equipment just for this specific vaccine,.

And mRNA therapies have been in the work since the 80's.   We never knew about them unless we had a specific cancer therapy and I think for good reason because the overhead has been huge.

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3 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

The question I have is why does the vaccine have to be kept at such a cold temperature as opposed to the non mRNA vaccines?   That is a failing in my opinion, required a lot of hospitals and facilities to upgrade equipment just for this specific vaccine,.

And mRNA therapies have been in the work since the 80's.   We never knew about them unless we had a specific cancer therapy and I think for good reason because the overhead has been huge.

What has made the mRNA vaccines possible is the great advancements in technology.  The development of PCR testing starts in the 90s. The SNPs or sometimes called gene chip started in the 2000s.Now it is possible to program a machine to make an RNA or DNA sequence.

As far as cold storage goes, long term storage is done at -20C. Short term storage, a month, can be done at refrigerator temperatures. Pfizer requires colder temperatures for long term storage.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/why-do-mrna-vaccines-need-cold-storage-180976330/

This is November 2020. By February 2021 we have this from Pfizer.

https://newatlas.com/health-wellbeing/pfizer-coronavirus-mrna-temperature-cold-freezer-vaccine/

 

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I think a lot of posters who are against mRNA need to read this link.

Why are mRNA vaccines so exciting?

Over the past year, the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna mRNA vaccines have proven unusually effective and safe. How do mRNA vaccines differ from traditional vaccines, and what makes them so exciting?

 

It strikes me a new era of medicine is finally emerging after years of trials.

It's something to be excited about, not something to fear. 

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11 hours ago, itsnotoutthere said:

 

mRNA was first tested in1996.

That's well over a decade before that comment was made. 

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4 hours ago, stereologist said:

Crazy how the foolish just repost something that fooled them thinking it will fool others.

 

Isn't it though.

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On 11/26/2022 at 2:43 PM, psyche101 said:

RNA vaccines rose to prominence during COVID, but we've only scratched the surface of their potential

The real power of microRNA lies in its ability to control multiple molecules at once.

This makes it particularly attractive for use as a therapeutic for complex diseases such as cancer and neurological diseases.

Essentially, microRNA controls entire biological pathways rather than single molecules.

To explain, imagine the streets in your neighbourhood represent a complex web of biological pathways, and the houses on the streets represent individual molecules.

One street has a problem that is affecting every house (or molecules).

A "traditional" drug would try to fix just one of the houses in the hope that this would help the overall integrity of the street.

But a drug that uses microRNA — either by increasing or inhibiting its function — could fix the majority of houses on the street at the same time.

This approach is what Viridian Therapeutics (formerly known as miRagen Therapeutics) tried to address when developing a drug to block a specific microRNA known as microRNA-155.

MicroRNA-155 has been heavily implicated in tumours and the progression of lymphoma and leukemia, as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Their drug, which made it to stage 2 clinical trials but didn't progress due to commercial reasons, actively stopped the activity of this microRNA, leading to alleviation of symptoms with these cancers.

This is just one example of the many microRNA based therapeutics currently in phase one and two clinical trials for a wide range of complex diseases.

 

mRNA being new is a very misunderstood process from what I gather in general.

It's not new.

It's not dangerous.

It's a new field that could have wide reaching implications regarding many life threatening ailments. As the article indicates it's potential is exciting.

Will those people who oppose it now still be opposing mRNA if it cures cancer? 

Most people don’t know it but mRNA was being used more than 10 years before Covid-19, it fact research first began in the 1960s so this certainly isn’t a new concept tied to Covid-19’s.

The paper below goes through the entire research history of mRNA from the 1960s to Covid-19.

The tangled history of mRNA vaccines: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02483-w

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3 hours ago, itsnotoutthere said:

Isn't it though.

Your posts are shining examples of reposting ignorance. Please continue to amuse us.

The simple fact is that as already exhibited in this thread mRNA has produced rabies vaccines, zika vaccines, COVID-19 vaccines, and is being applied cancers.

Malone, today a crank who falsely claims to have invented mRNA vaccines, did his mRNA research in the 1980s.

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https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/understanding/therapy/mrnavaccines/

Quote

Vaccines help prevent infection by preparing the body to fight foreign invaders (such as bacteria, viruses, or other pathogens). All vaccines introduce into the body a harmless piece of a particular bacteria or virus, triggering an immune response. Most vaccines contain a weakened or dead bacteria or virus. However, scientists have developed a new type of vaccine that uses a molecule called messenger RNA (mRNA) rather than part of an actual bacteria or virus. Messenger RNA is a type of RNA that is necessary for protein production.  Once cells finish making a protein, they quickly break down the mRNA. mRNA from vaccines does not enter the nucleus and does not alter DNA.

 

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https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/treatments/21898-mrna-vaccines

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mRNA vaccines protect you from disease. The current ones work by teaching your body to build a protein from the COVID-19 virus. Your body sees that the protein doesn’t belong and makes antibodies to protect you from it. mRNA vaccines are safe and effective. Millions of people have received the vaccines, and side effects are rare.

 

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14 hours ago, stereologist said:

We had a different method that did the same thing and it is inexpensive to produce, less tricky to store (less expense) and so what is the real reason of switching to mRNA vaccines?    They have not been proven to be better than the last version  of flu shot.  And since the virus mutates faster than influenza it makes even less sense.

Edited by Desertrat56
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54 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

We had a different method that did the same thing and it is inexpensive to produce, less tricky to store (less expense) and so what is the real reason of switching to mRNA vaccines?    They have not been proven to be better than the last version  of flu shot.  And since the virus mutates faster than influenza it makes even less sense.

All excellent questions.

https://www.vumc.org/viiii/infographics/how-does-mrna-vaccine-compare-traditional-vaccine

Quote

Safety: Unlike live-attenuated or viral-vectored vaccines, mRNA is non-infectious and poses no concern for DNA integration—mainly because it cannot enter the nucleus which contains DNA. Other strategies such as protein-based or inactivated vaccines also require chemicals and cell cultures to produce. mRNA is made through a cell-independent process and does not require inactivation; thus, it poses no safety concerns due to contamination with toxic agents.

 

Efficacy: mRNA is rapidly degraded in the body, and cells don't readily take up foreign mRNA. Recent technology has modified the mRNA molecule to make it more stable and packaged the molecules in fats (called lipids), increasing cell delivery efficiency. These advances increase the amount of spike protein produced on your cells, thereby stimulating a more effective immune response.

 

Production: mRNA can be quickly designed and scaled up, if necessary. The manufacturing is sequence-independent, which makes it highly adaptable to different pathogens. The cost is also lower than other platforms and will continue to decrease as the technology expands.

 

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10 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

We had a different method that did the same thing and it is inexpensive to produce, less tricky to store (less expense) and so what is the real reason of switching to mRNA vaccines?    They have not been proven to be better than the last version  of flu shot.  And since the virus mutates faster than influenza it makes even less sense.

They work on a wider scale 

As per the example from the OP:

A traditional vaccine would fix one house in a street and expect that trend to spread to the other houses. It sets a standard so to speak that the immunity system up a as a template. 

mRNA will just say fix all houses in a street at once. It recognises the issue and repairs it wherever it occurs. 

 

Edited by psyche101
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  • 5 weeks later...

Plan for mRNA cancer vaccine trials to start in United Kingdom this year

 

Key points:

  • The United Kingdom has signed a deal with German pharmaceutical company BioNTech
  • They hope to provide personalised cancer therapies for up to 10,000 patients by the end of 2030
  • Scientists believe mRNA vaccines could be a game-changer against many diseases. 

 

mRNA is just becoming more and more beneficial. 

Now we are looking at direct cancer cures.

This has been amazing and really puts the anti vax nonsense firmly in its place, absolute rubbish that it is.

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