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Can you tackle a Victorian exam paper?


Eldorado

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Do you think you’ve got what it takes to tackle exam questions from 1859?

Shake off the cobwebs and give your brain a workout with this 19th Century test.

This exam paper, now owned by the Library of the Royal College of Surgeons, was produced by the UK’s first teaching association, the College of Preceptors.

These teachers predominantly taught at private schools.

As well as traditional subjects like maths, history and English, students were also tested on land and marine surveying, bookkeeping and commercial science, Latin and Greek.

But don’t worry, we’ve stuck to more familiar topics for this quiz.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z8mvhcw?

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6/8 not so good in math :lol:

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Oooof 3/8, 5 if I went with my gut on two of the questions.

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My head hurts... 

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I got 6 out of 8.  I never heard of the doomsday book, and I missed the math problem.  

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1 minute ago, Alchopwn said:

Aced it.  I'm such a girly swot.

Can you explain what the math question meant?  I didn't understand it.

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Just now, Desertrat56 said:

Can you explain what the math question meant?  I didn't understand it.

It was all about the lowest number that all the provided numbers could divide into that would still produce a whole number (no fractions).  Well, either that or I totally guessed correctly without reading it properly. :lol:

Edited by Alchopwn
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2 minutes ago, Alchopwn said:

It was all about the lowest number that all the provided numbers could divide into that would still produce a whole number (no fractions).  Well, that or I totally guessed correctly without reading it properly. :lol:

Oh, I get it.  I thought it was a common denominator but that didn't make sense so I just choose the middle one.  I can look at numbers and calculate all kinds of things but I guess I lost the ability in my old age to do word problems.   :lol:  And that was just barely a word problem.

Edited by Desertrat56
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I only got 4/8, I knew how to do the math problem, but I just quested because I was too lazy to take the time to figure it out.  Interesting though.

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8 minutes ago, Alchopwn said:

Aced it.  I'm such a girly swot.

That was pretty impressive, if you didn’t use google lol.

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Just now, Guyver said:

That was pretty impressive, if you didn’t use google lol.

Me no nee no steenkin' google.

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42 minutes ago, Alchopwn said:

It was all about the lowest number that all the provided numbers could divide into that would still produce a whole number (no fractions).  Well, either that or I totally guessed correctly without reading it properly. :lol:

I was sure the largest number could be used as a quick method, not sure where I picked that up but I was wrong. :lol:

Only 5 for me. :whistle: Some questions a bit random, time difference in St Petersburg ? 

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Just now, L.A.T.1961 said:

I was sure the largest number could be used as a quick method, not sure where I picked that up but I was wrong. :lol:

Only 5 for me. :whistle: Some questions a bit random, time difference in St Petersburg ? 

3 hours.   I guess a long time ago they needed to know that.

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4 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

3 hours.   I guess a long time ago they needed to know that.

It seems they pre-suppose those being tested should know what the longitude is for all major world cities in relation to GMT.  

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18 hours ago, and-then said:

It seems they pre-suppose those being tested should know what the longitude is for all major world cities in relation to GMT.  

During the 19th Century, an age of maritime travel, a knowledge of longitude was an essential skill for an anglophone gentleman.

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23 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

3 hours.   I guess a long time ago they needed to know that.

Maybe not for St Petersburg, but when I worked in international insurance in the 1990s we needed to know the time difference for many countries - no point in phoning Mexico City when it was still 5am there ;)   

Got them all right, but must admit, I used a calculator the for the maths question.  And the music one was a bit of a guess.

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  • 2 weeks later...

2/8 :blush:

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6/8 — but I pressed the wrong thing on the first question, so I'm calling it 7. :yes:

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4/8

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