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First Crewed Starliner Flight Test [updated - docked to ISS]


Waspie_Dwarf

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Marvelous! 👍

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NASA, Boeing Progress on Testing Starliner with Crew at Space Station

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The Starliner spacecraft on NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test approaches the International Space Station while orbiting 263 miles above Quebec, Canada. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams aboard Starliner docked to the orbital outpost’s forward port on the Harmony module at 1:34 p.m. EDT on Thursday, June 6. Photo credit: NASA

Orbiting Earth as part of the nine-person crew of the International Space Station, NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams continue testing Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft as part of its first flight with astronauts. The testing is part of the data collection on the Starliner system for certification by NASA for regular crewed mission to the orbital complex.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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NASA, Boeing Target June 22 for Flight Crew Test Return

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This view from a window on the cupola overlooks a portion of the International Space and shows the partially obscured Starliner spacecraft from Boeing docked to the Harmony module’s forward port. Photo credit: NASA

NASA and Boeing now are targeting no earlier than Saturday, June 22, to return the agency’s Boeing Crew Flight Test mission from the International Space Station. The extra time allows the team to finalize departure planning and operations while the spacecraft remains cleared for crew emergency return scenarios within the flight rules.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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NASA, Boeing Adjust Timeline for Starliner Return

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An aurora streams below Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft docked to the forward port on the Harmony module as the International Space Station soared 266 miles above the Indian Ocean southwest of Australia. Photo credit: NASA/Matt Dominick

NASA and Boeing leadership are adjusting the return to Earth of the Starliner Crew Flight Test spacecraft with agency astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams from the International Space Station. The move off Wednesday, June 26, deconflicts Starliner’s undocking and landing from a series of planned International Space Station spacewalks while allowing mission teams time to review propulsion system data. Listen to a full replay of the June 18 media briefing where NASA and Boeing leadership discussed the ongoing efforts.

“We are taking our time and following our standard mission management team process,” said Steve Stich, manager of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. “We are letting the data drive our decision making relative to managing the small helium system leaks and thruster performance we observed during rendezvous and docking. Additionally, given the duration of the mission, it is appropriate for us to complete an agency-level review, similar to what was done ahead of the NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 return after two months on orbit, to document the agency’s formal acceptance on proceeding as planned.”

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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NASA, Boeing Discuss Ground Testing, Starliner Timeline

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The Starliner spacecraft on NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test is pictured docked to the Harmony module’s forward port as the International Space Station orbited 262 miles above Egypt’s Mediterranean coast. Photo credit: NASA

During a media teleconference Friday, leaders from NASA and Boeing provided an update about Starliner’s Crew Flight Test. The integrated Starliner team continues to evaluate the spacecraft’s propulsion system performance and complete other forward work before scheduling undocking from the International Space Station. Listen to a full replay of the teleconference.

“Our goal is to bring Butch and Suni home aboard Boeing’s spacecraft, and we are working to confirm Starliner will perform as designed to return them safely to Earth,” said Ken Bowersox, associate administrator, NASA’s Space Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters in Washington. “Space station gives us the luxury of time, allowing us to look at data we gathered on the way uphill and conduct some additional testing. We’re still in the middle of a test mission, and we want to spend more time with the data before we make the final call to put the crew aboard the spacecraft for return.”

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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NASA, Boeing Conduct Ground Tests Ahead of Starliner Return

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NASA astronauts Suni Williams and Butch Wilmore speak during a news conference aboard the International Space Station on Wednesday, July 10, 2024. Photo credit: NASA Television

NASA and Boeing continue working to increase their understanding of the Starliner spacecraft’s propulsion system before the return of agency astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams to Earth from the International Space Station. Teams are conducting ground tests at the agency’s White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico using a new Reaction Control System thruster previously planned for use on a future Starliner flight.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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All the media are saying they are stranded, rescue in August if at all. It is a shame you close threads about the situation as it is reported everywhere.

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4 minutes ago, pellinore said:

It is a shame you close threads about the situation as it is reported everywhere.

I closed the thread because it was a duplicate of an existing thread... this one, which I left a link for... that is standard practice when someone posts a duplicate thread, particularly as it was in the wrong forum anyway.

 

 

2 minutes ago, pellinore said:

All the media are saying they are stranded, rescue in August if at all.

The media are wrong. Sensationalist headlines are far more effective for selling products to the gullible than boring truths are.

No one is stranded, the spacecraft is fit to return home at any time and is still serving as the, "lifeboat" for the to astronauts, which means that it can return home at very short notice if needed. They will not be, "rescued" in August, they will return home in the Starliner they left Earth in, probably in late July.

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For the past few weeks, NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams have been stuck on the International Space Station (ISS) after the first crewed voyage of Boeing's new Starliner spacecraft hit a snag. Concerns raised by Boeing and NASA over thruster problems and several helium leaks (helium is used in Starliner's engine system) have prevented the craft from making the return journey as scheduled. NASA has now said the astronauts may have to stay put until the next scheduled crew switchover in August — potentially on another ship..

 

Four of the five thrusters have been repaired while Starliner has been docked to the ISS, but it raises concern for other thrusters cutting out during the return journey to Earth. On Starliner's return, re-entering Earth's atmosphere requires a very specific "angle of attack" to ensure there is not too much friction heating up the vessel..

https://www.livescience.com/space/space-exploration/fixing-boeings-leaky-starliner-and-returning-nasas-stranded-astronauts-to-earth-is-much-harder-than-it-sounds

 

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