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Construction of NASA’s Roman Space Telescope [updated]


Waspie_Dwarf

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Goddard Team Builds, Tests Calibrator for NASA’s Roman in Record Time

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A vital subsystem for NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope was recently delivered to Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colorado, and installed in the spacecraft’s Wide Field Instrument (WFI). Called the Simplified Relative Calibration System (sRCS), this component will allow astronomers to measure the total light output of cosmic objects like galaxies and supernovae with extreme accuracy. When Roman launches by May 2027, scientists will use this data to unravel the secrets of dark energy and dark matter, discover exoplanets, and explore many topics in infrared astrophysics.

Read More: NASA

 

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Framework for NASA’s Roman Spacecraft Moves to Goddard Clean Room

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A large metallic structure is suspended from the ceiling in a spacious room. The structure is hollow with six sides, each covered with a diamond-like pattern. Three people in bunny suits watch in the foreground.

The primary structure that will serve as the “bones” of NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope has moved into the big clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The spacecraft bus, Roman’s primary support element, will now be built upon this skeletal framework. When it launches by May 2027, Roman will help unravel the secrets of dark energy and dark matter, search for and image exoplanets, and explore many topics in infrared astrophysics.

“This is a milestone several years in the making,” said Caroline Griffin, a mechanical engineer at Goddard. “The Roman team carefully assembled nearly 2,000 individual components, many of them custom-designed by Goddard engineers, to create this structure.”

Read More: NASA

 

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf
merged thread, removed "related story" link.
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  • The title was changed to Construction of NASA’s Roman Space Telescope

NASA Completes Heart of Roman Space Telescope’s Primary Instrument

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An iridescent purplish-blue array of squares attached to a chunky, rectangular piece of metal hardware is seen from below. Gloved hands guide the hardware while a man in a white suit and gloves attaches a silver covering to the array.

The heart of NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope was recently delivered to Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colorado, for integration into the WFI (Wide Field Instrument). Called the FPS (Focal Plane System), it serves as the core of Roman’s camera. When the mission launches by May 2027, astronomers will use this system to gather exquisite images to help unravel the secrets of dark energy and dark matter, discover exoplanets, and explore many topics in infrared astrophysics.

Read More: NASA

 

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NASA Begins Integrating ‘Nervous System’ for Roman Space Telescope

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NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope team has begun integrating and testing the spacecraft’s electrical cabling, or harness, which enables different parts of the observatory to communicate with one another. Additionally, the harness provides power and helps the central computer monitor the observatory’s function via an array of sensors. This brings the mission a step closer to surveying billions of cosmic objects and untangling mysteries like dark energy following its launch by May 2027.

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Primary Instrument for NASA’s Roman Completed, Begins Tests

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A team of engineers and technicians at Ball Aerospace, one of the industry partners for NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope, and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, have finished assembling the spacecraft’s giant camera. Called the Wide Field Instrument (WFI), this state-of-the-art tool will enable astronomers to explore the cosmos from the outskirts of our solar system to the edge of the observable universe.

“The year-long integration effort culminates in the instrument’s first baseline performance testing, where we turn on the instrument to ensure it’s working as expected,” said Mary Walker, Roman’s WFI instrument manager at Goddard. “Now the team is ready to take the instrument through key environmental testing to show it can withstand the harsh conditions of launch and in space.”

Read More: NASA

 

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  • The title was changed to Construction of NASA’s Roman Space Telescope [updated]

NASA Puts Next-Gen Exoplanet-Imaging Technology to the Test

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JPL scientist Vanessa Bailey stands behind the Nancy Grace Roman Coronagraph, which has been undergoing testing at JPL. About the size of a baby grand piano, the Coronagraph is designed to block starlight and allow scientists to see the faint light from planets outside our solar system.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

A cutting-edge tool to view planets outside our solar system has passed two key tests ahead of its launch as part of the agency’s Roman Space Telescope by 2027.

The Coronagraph Instrument on NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will demonstrate new technologies that could vastly increase the number of planets outside our solar system (exoplanets) that scientists can directly observe. Designed and built at the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, it recently passed a series of critical tests ahead of launch. That includes tests to ensure the instrument’s electrical components don’t interfere with those on the rest of the observatory and vice versa.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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NASA’s Roman Space Telescope’s ‘Eyes’ Pass First Vision Test

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This photo shows the entire optics system for NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope. It consists of 10 mirrors, including the 7.9-foot (2.4-meter) primary mirror seen at the base in this image, and is called the IOA (Imaging Optical Assembly). Engineers recently integrated and tested the IOA at L3Harris Technologies in Rochester, New York.
Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn

Engineers at L3Harris Technologies in Rochester, New York, have combined all 10 mirrors for NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope. Preliminary tests show the newly aligned optics, collectively called the IOA (Imaging Optics Assembly), will direct light into Roman’s science instruments extremely precisely. This will yield crisp images of space once the observatory launches.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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I hope they are still on schedule.

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NASA Tool Gets Ready to Image Faraway Planets

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A technology demo on the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will help increase the variety of distant planets scientists can directly image.

The Roman Coronagraph Instrument on NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will help pave the way in the search for habitable worlds outside our solar system by testing new tools that block starlight, revealing planets hidden by the glare of their parent stars. The technology demonstration recently shipped from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California to the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, where it has joined the rest of the space observatory in preparation for launch by May 2027.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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