Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

Loch Ness Monster hunter: I thought this job would be easier


Still Waters

Recommended Posts

Steve Feltham has dedicated his life to solving the mystery of the Loch Ness Monster.

He gave up his job and sold his home in Dorset to move to Dores on the shores of the loch in 1991.

Now, after more than 30 years of searching for Nessie, he said he thought the task would have been easier.

Mr Feltham made his first sighting of something unexplained within his first year of his search, and had hoped to make further sightings soon after.

Continued:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-65558327

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, Still Waters said:

He gave up his job and sold his home

:lol: idiot

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This lends more weight to the theory that Nessie is something beyond just another undiscovered animal but has properties we call 'paranormal'. Like Bigfoot one would think a breeding population of any 'normal' huge animal would have been known a century or two ago.

Edited by papageorge1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Dejarma said:

:lol: idiot

Maybe.  I guess it depends on what his job was and what he has made since.  Also if he has enjoyed his choices.   He'll never find Nessie because it doesn't exist.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Myles said:

Maybe.  I guess it depends on what his job was and what he has made since.  Also if he has enjoyed his choices.   He'll never find Nessie because it doesn't exist.

i'm calling him an idiot because he thinks it exists, left his job for it or not

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, papageorge1 said:

This lends more weight to the theory

to you it does :wacko:

;)

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

House was in shambles, sick of his job and nearing retirement age, on government stipend and g/f was a nag. There are worse ways to spend them than looking for the Loch Ness Monster, bottle of Lagavulin 16 nearby, Padron 1926 No 48 burning.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

the Templar said the same, but they use the grail as false flag, nobody really believes that they were searching for the holy grail.

Edited by josellama2000
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/12/2023 at 3:10 PM, Dejarma said:

:lol: idiot

Not a bad life, to be fair. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, papageorge1 said:

This lends more weight to the theory that Nessie is something beyond just another undiscovered animal but has properties we call 'paranormal'. Like Bigfoot one would think a breeding population of any 'normal' huge animal would have been known a century or two ago.

The so-called monster was invented in the early 1930s. The story that the legend goes back further has been shown to be untrue. 

 

Like Bigfoot, people just enjoy the myth, and that's the only reason why any stories persist. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, sanchez710 said:

Eels are the most likely explanation
Some grow to a fair size and weigh over 5kg

There's a hundred and twelve explanations, to be honest. Eels are just one of them. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

Film crews and journalists from all over the world turn up on a regular basis, and I answer all their questions, but they are invariably focused on one subject: is there a monster, or isn’t there? Which is perfectly understandable, but it frustrates me that I never have the chance to get an equally important point across: that if you have a dream, no matter how harebrained others think it is, then it is worth trying to make it come true. I’m living proof that it might just work. Have I ever regretted my decision?

Never, not for one second.

I love my life, it’s an adventure.

https://www.nessiehunter.co.uk/about/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Gilbert Syndrome said:

The so-called monster was invented in the early 1930s. The story that the legend goes back further has been shown to be untrue. 

 

Like Bigfoot, people just enjoy the myth, and that's the only reason why any stories persist. 

I think there are too many quality sightings and photos/videos to dismiss outright. I think there is likely something to it, more so even with Bigfoot than Nessie.

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Gilbert Syndrome said:

Not a bad life, to be fair. 

yeah to be fair i agree= living on the loch, great.. but my point is believing it is real is why i'm calling him an idiot- not for moving there

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Cho Jinn said:

House was in shambles, sick of his job and nearing retirement age, on government stipend and g/f was a nag. There are worse ways to spend them than looking for the Loch Ness Monster, bottle of Lagavulin 16 nearby, Padron 1926 No 48 burning.

He was 28 when he went to Loch Ness.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, papageorge1 said:

I think there are too many quality sightings and photos/videos to dismiss outright. I think there is likely something to it, more so even with Bigfoot than Nessie.

I'm not sure that I'd agree. The initial sightings which sparked the craze of the '30s can be traced back to Alex Campbell, who seemingly spent a lot of time telling porkies and claiming various sightings that were all very questionable in origin and validity. Those that lived and worked in, on and around the loch had no such stories to tell despite having lived and worked there for generations. 

 

The Spicer sighting was very questionable, and his story changed many times over the years. The sightings pre-1933 were all very vague in description, until the classic description, likely influenced by King Kong, was entered into the public's imagination. Then there's Marmadukeand his shenanigans, and the hoaxed "surgeon's photograph," and lots of stories cropping up nearly daily due to excitement created by the stories being doled out in abundance. Many of the local papers were sceptical about the entire saga, as well as the involvement of Alex Campbell. 

 

There's a good piece on the subject in the latest Fortian Times, as well as the book, Abominable Science, both of which cover in better detail the points I've briefly mentioned.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Gilbert Syndrome said:

I'm not sure that I'd agree. The initial sightings which sparked the craze of the '30s can be traced back to Alex Campbell, who seemingly spent a lot of time telling porkies and claiming various sightings that were all very questionable in origin and validity. Those that lived and worked in, on and around the loch had no such stories to tell despite having lived and worked there for generations. 

 

The Spicer sighting was very questionable, and his story changed many times over the years. The sightings pre-1933 were all very vague in description, until the classic description, likely influenced by King Kong, was entered into the public's imagination. Then there's Marmadukeand his shenanigans, and the hoaxed "surgeon's photograph," and lots of stories cropping up nearly daily due to excitement created by the stories being doled out in abundance. Many of the local papers were sceptical about the entire saga, as well as the involvement of Alex Campbell. 

 

There's a good piece on the subject in the latest Fortian Times, as well as the book, Abominable Science, both of which cover in better detail the points I've briefly mentioned.

But there is an iceberg 

Sightings count at Loch Ness - 1145 recorded to date (Link)

 

Webcam images from 2021 onwards - 10 recorded to date

 

And I have heard people give quite detailed descriptions. 

My leading thought is that something we might call paranormal is there,

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, papageorge1 said:

But there is an iceberg 

Sightings count at Loch Ness - 1145 recorded to date (Link)

 

Webcam images from 2021 onwards - 10 recorded to date

 

And I have heard people give quite detailed descriptions. 

My leading thought is that something we might call paranormal is there,

I think with a lot of these sorts of things, once people get an idea in their heads, and the stories begin to take shape, you tend to get "sightings."  

 
Once people start to flock to places where they think a monster lurks, then they'll begin to see it with every boat wake, every bird, every fish, every anomaly. 
 
When someone is adamant that UFO's are out there and aliens are visiting us, they'll go out and see a dozen UFO's. Ghosts aren't much different in that you tend to get people flocking to so-called "haunted" places in the hopes of witnessing something supernatural, and quite often, they will, because these people are expecting to see, feel or detect something unnatural. 
 
I've no doubt that people see a lot of things, but I seriously doubt that those things are actually there to begin with. 
 
Many of these descriptions of the loch Ness monster tend to be based upon the common belief that the creature is a plesiosaur, and people take that idea and run with it, despite the reason for the plesiosaur idea being largely based upon a hoax and probably the sauropod in King Kong, ignoring the fact that plesiosaurs couldn't physically move their necks in the manner described by Nessie witnesses and the fact that it breathed oxygen. 
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Gilbert Syndrome said:

I think with a lot of these sorts of things, once people get an idea in their heads, and the stories begin to take shape, you tend to get "sightings."  

 
Once people start to flock to places where they think a monster lurks, then they'll begin to see it with every boat wake, every bird, every fish, every anomaly. 
 
When someone is adamant that UFO's are out there and aliens are visiting us, they'll go out and see a dozen UFO's. Ghosts aren't much different in that you tend to get people flocking to so-called "haunted" places in the hopes of witnessing something supernatural, and quite often, they will, because these people are expecting to see, feel or detect something unnatural. 
 
I've no doubt that people see a lot of things, but I seriously doubt that those things are actually there to begin with. 
 
Many of these descriptions of the loch Ness monster tend to be based upon the common belief that the creature is a plesiosaur, and people take that idea and run with it, despite the reason for the plesiosaur idea being largely based upon a hoax and probably the sauropod in King Kong, ignoring the fact that plesiosaurs couldn't physically move their necks in the manner described by Nessie witnesses and the fact that it breathed oxygen. 

Certainly, I consider all you say but I think there are enough rather detailed claims to believe there is some fire behind the smoke for the subjects you mentioned. I think some people are too eager to dismiss things that don't fit nicely into their worldview too. So I consider everything.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Gilbert Syndrome said:

I think with a lot of these sorts of things, once people get an idea in their heads, and the stories begin to take shape, you tend to get "sightings."  

 
Once people start to flock to places where they think a monster lurks, then they'll begin to see it with every boat wake, every bird, every fish, every anomaly. 
 
When someone is adamant that UFO's are out there and aliens are visiting us, they'll go out and see a dozen UFO's. Ghosts aren't much different in that you tend to get people flocking to so-called "haunted" places in the hopes of witnessing something supernatural, and quite often, they will, because these people are expecting to see, feel or detect something unnatural. 
 
I've no doubt that people see a lot of things, but I seriously doubt that those things are actually there to begin with. 
 
Many of these descriptions of the loch Ness monster tend to be based upon the common belief that the creature is a plesiosaur, and people take that idea and run with it, despite the reason for the plesiosaur idea being largely based upon a hoax and probably the sauropod in King Kong, ignoring the fact that plesiosaurs couldn't physically move their necks in the manner described by Nessie witnesses and the fact that it breathed oxygen. 

I totally agree.   If I sit in my house (200+ years old) and think it is haunted, I will here things to confirm that it is.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, papageorge1 said:

Certainly, I consider all you say but I think there are enough rather detailed claims to believe there is some fire behind the smoke for the subjects you mentioned. I think some people are too eager to dismiss things that don't fit nicely into their worldview too. So I consider everything.

 

That's up to you, mate. I'd personally love it to be true, like with anything cryptid, supernatural or otherworldly. 

 

My problem is that when you start to break down the sightings and claims, they don't really add up to much of anything that we could call tangible. Likewise, once we start to assess the probability of such a creature, as well as a viable breeding population of these creatures, actually existing within the loch undetected, much like Bigfoot, it becomes more and more likely that they exist within our minds as opposed to our lakes, lochs or seas.  

 

Are there any particular sightings that you find credible?

Edited by Gilbert Syndrome
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Myles said:

I totally agree.   If I sit in my house (200+ years old) and think it is haunted, I will here things to confirm that it is.  

Pretty much. 

I've a work colleague who goes to supposedly haunted locations with groups, which is becoming more and more popular in the UK. What baffles me is they always go to these places at night, and someone will inevitably have some sort of experience. 

 

I used to work in security, and I've worked in supposedly haunted buildings and locations, and undoubtedly, when you go into these places with the knowledge of their supposed haunting and it's the middle of the night, and if you're at all accepting of the paranormal, then any noise you hear, or shadow you see in the corner of your eye, will probably be attributed to a ghost. 

With Nessie, there's so much within the water that you could mistake for a "monster," and if you're inclined to do so, then you likely will. 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Gilbert Syndrome said:

That's up to you, mate. I'd personally love it to be true, like with anything cryptid, supernatural or otherworldly. 

 

My problem is that when you start to break down the sightings and claims, they don't really add up to much of anything that we could call tangible. Likewise, once we start to assess the probability of such a creature, as well as a viable breeding population of these creatures, actually existing within the loch undetected, much like Bigfoot, it becomes more and more likely that they exist within our minds as opposed to our lakes, lochs or seas.  

 

Are there any particular sightings that guy find credible?

I think things like the Patterson film of Bigfoot is quite tangible as well as rather close-up encounters with other cryptids.
 

I agree with your point about how can a breeding population of huge species go so uncertain. My leading theory is that they have aspects we call paranormal and are not full-time residents of our normal physical reality.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.