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U.S. Total Solar Eclipse - 8th April 2024 [merged and updated]


Waspie_Dwarf

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NASA Funds 3 Citizen Science Projects to Study 2024 U.S. Solar Eclipse

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NASA has awarded funding for three science teams to conduct citizen science investigations as a total solar eclipse sweeps across North America on April 8, 2024. In these experiments, volunteers will help study the Sun and its ethereal outer atmosphere, called the corona, which is revealed when the Moon completely covers the Sun’s bright disk.

“During next year’s total eclipse, hundreds of volunteers will capture images of the Sun and its corona to help answer real science question about our star and how it affects us,” said program scientist and eclipse lead at NASA Headquarters, Kelly Korreck.

Read More: NASA

 

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How the 2024 Total Solar Eclipse Is Different than the 2017 Eclipse

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On April 8, the Moon’s shadow will sweep across the United States, as millions will view a total solar eclipse. For many, preparing for this event brings memories of the magnificent total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017.

36548089062-c94434d3c8-k.thumb.webp.f3f6bfe32963cfcd8782120824a254a2.webp

 

The total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017, was photographed from Madras, Oregon. The black circle in the middle is the Moon. Surrounding it are white streams of light belonging to the Sun’s outer atmosphere, called the corona.
NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

In 2017, an estimated 215 million U.S. adults (88% of U.S. adults) viewed the solar eclipse, either directly or electronically. They experienced the Moon pass in front of the Sun, blocking part or all of our closest star’s bright face. The eclipse in 2024 could be even more exciting due to differences in the path, timing, and scientific research.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

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Edited by Waspie_Dwarf
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Posted (edited)

Total Solar Eclipse 2024: The Moon’s Moment in the Sun

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On April 8, 2024, much of North America will experience a solar eclipse: a cosmic alignment of Sun, Moon, and Earth, in that order. The Moon’s shadow path will make landfall on Mexico’s Pacific coast, cross the United States from Texas to Maine, and exit North America via Newfoundland, Canada, continuing into the Atlantic Ocean.

 

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Posted (edited)

Five Tips from NASA for Photographing a Total Solar Eclipse

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A total solar eclipse creates stunning celestial views for people within the path of the Moon’s shadow. This astronomical event is a unique opportunity for scientists to study the Sun and its influence on Earth, but it’s also a perfect opportunity to capture unforgettable images. Whether you’re an amateur photographer or a selfie master, try out these tips for photographing the eclipse.  

A total solar eclipse is a unique opportunity for scientists studying in the shadow of the Moon, but it’s also a perfect opportunity to capture unforgettable images. Whether you’re an amateur photographer or a selfie master, try out these tips for photographing the eclipse.
NASA/Beth Anthony

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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My area will see 89% totality while my son in Erie will see 100%. 

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24 minutes ago, susieice said:

My area will see 89% totality while my son in Erie will see 100%. 

I saw the 1999 eclipse from my house. It was around 98 or 99% total from London. In 2001 I went to Zimbabwe and experienced 100% totality. The difference is amazing. You can see the Moon's shadow, on the ground, rushing towards you. Then, when totality hits, the sky doesn't go totally dark. It's dark enough that birds begin to roost, but the Sun's corona gives some illumination. The sky becomes a weird pinkish colour, but not like sunset or sunrise. The air temperature drops noticeably. Then, a  too soon, there is the diamond ring effect and totality is over.

To anyone that has a chance to see a total eclipse, take it, you won't regret it. It is one of the most beautiful, awe inspiring natural events you can possibly experience. 

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I'm quite sure that where I live the sky will be overcast. 

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NASA to Launch Sounding Rockets into Moon’s Shadow During Solar Eclipse

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NASA will launch three sounding rockets during the total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024, to study how Earth’s upper atmosphere is affected when sunlight momentarily dims over a portion of the planet.

The Atmospheric Perturbations around Eclipse Path (APEP) sounding rockets will launch from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia to study the disturbances in the ionosphere created when the Moon eclipses the Sun. The sounding rockets had been previously launched and successfully recovered from White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico, during the October 2023 annular solar eclipse. They have been refurbished with new instrumentation and will be relaunched in April 2024. The mission is led by Aroh Barjatya, a professor of engineering physics at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida, where he directs the Space and Atmospheric Instrumentation Lab.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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  • The title was changed to U.S. Total Solar Eclipse - 8th April 2024 [merged and updated]

How to Watch Upcoming Total Solar Eclipse with NASA from Anywhere

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eclipse-map-2024.thumb.jpg.adfc29552c2e6b74874725f35e1248d0.jpg

 

The April 8, 2024, solar eclipse will be visible in the entire contiguous United States, weather permitting. People along the path of totality stretching from Texas to Maine will have the chance to see a total solar eclipse; outside this path, a partial solar eclipse will be visible.
Credits: NASA

On Monday, April 8, most of North America will have the chance to see the Moon pass in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse. NASA is inviting the public to participate with in-person events, opportunities to do NASA science, and multiple ways to watch online.

Millions of people along the path of totality – which stretches from Texas to Maine in the United States – will see a total solar eclipse, when the Moon completely covers the Sun. Outside the path of totality, people across the contiguous United States will have a chance to see a partial solar eclipse, when the Moon covers part of the Sun. Learn how to safely view this celestial event.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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Unveiling the Sun: NASA’s Open Data Approach to Solar Eclipse Research

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eclipse2017.thumb.webp.3a84c401d5abe2379b4ef1f09bd43426.webp

 

A total solar eclipse is seen on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.
NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

As the world eagerly anticipates the upcoming total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024, NASA is preparing for an extraordinary opportunity for scientific discovery, open collaboration, and public engagement. At the heart of the agency’s approach to this unusual event lies a commitment to open science, ensuring that the data captured during the eclipse is readily accessible to all.

During a total solar eclipse the normal rhythms of Earth are briefly disrupted, providing an unusual opportunity for scientists to study the atmosphere of our solar-powered planet. Because NASA uses the vantage point of space to understand and explore our home planet to improve lives and safeguard our future, solar eclipses offer scientists a one-of-a-kind window into the workings of our solar system. 

Read More: NASA

 

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I don't understand why people are flipping out over this. We have schools that are closing early or are having delayed release over the eclipse. Reactions are somewhere between something never seen before and a disaster event. Or is it another media overhyped event?

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5 hours ago, weaselrunner said:

Or is it another media overhyped event?

Only someone that has never experience a total solar eclipse would ask this question.

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6 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Only someone that has never experience a total solar eclipse would ask this question.

I'm 60, I've seen a couple. But it sounds like a lot of others have not.

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Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, weaselrunner said:

I'm 60, I've seen a couple. But it sounds like a lot of others have not.

Same here, one in 2017 and one in maybe 1994??  It’s a truly awesome thing to experience, especially during midday.

As to post #11, it’s nothing to freak out about.   It’s merely a brief display of one of the many wonders of our solar system.  

Edited by Megaro
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On 4/1/2024 at 11:11 AM, Abramelin said:

And this total solar eclipse may be extra spectacular:

https://time.com/6958713/devil-comet-solar-eclipse-2024/

Unfortunately Pons-Brooks is not a particularly spectacular comet and is only just visible to the naked eye, so it will be something to look for but will add little to the spectacle.

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30 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Unfortunately Pons-Brooks is not a particularly spectacular comet and is only just visible to the naked eye, so it will be something to look for but will add little to the spectacle.

Because of the solar eclipse it may be very visible.

But it will be the Americans who will sit on the front seat to view the spectacle.

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32 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

Because of the solar eclipse it may be very visible.

Emphasis on the "may be".

There is an enormous difference to something being just about visible and something being spectacular.

Edited to add:

An eclipse will not make it VERY visible. If it isn't very visible in the night sky (which it isn't) it won't be very visible during the eclipse. The eclipse does nothing to the comet, it just brings about a short, dark period making objects not visible in the day sky, such as planets, stars and comets, briefly visible during the day.

Pons-Brooks is not a spectacular comet, the eclipse won't change that.

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On 4/1/2024 at 1:39 AM, weaselrunner said:

I'm 60, I've seen a couple. But it sounds like a lot of others have not.

The vast majority of the human race have never seen (or never will see) a total eclipse of the Sun. Many have experience a partial eclipse but the path of totality is very narrow. For this eclipse it is just 108-122 miles wide (it was just 62-71 miles across for the 2017 eclipse). If you are not in that narrow path you will only experience a partial eclipse... which lacks the awe inspiring splendour of a partial eclipse.

From any given point on the Earth's surface a total solar eclipse is extremely rare. After 8th April there will not be another anywhere in the contiguous United States until 23rd August 2044.

It could be even worse, here in the UK for instance, the last total solar eclipse clipped a very small part of the mainland in 1999... and it was cloudy in Cornwall. The next is not until 2090. That's why I travelled to Zimbabwe to see one.

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Citizen Scientists Invited to Collect Data for NASA During Eclipse

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On April 8, 2024, as the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, thousands of amateur citizen scientists will measure air temperatures and snap pictures of clouds. The data they collect will aid researchers who are investigating how the Sun influences climates in different environments.

Among those citizen scientists are the fifth- and sixth-grade students at Alpena Elementary in northwest Arkansas. In the weeks leading up to the eclipse, these students are visiting the school’s weather station 10 times a day to collect temperature readings and monitor cloud cover. They will then upload the data to a phone-based app that’s part of a NASA-led program called GLOBE, short for Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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55 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Emphasis on the "may be".

There is an enormous difference to something being just about visible and something being spectacular.

Edited to add:

An eclipse will not make it VERY visible. If it isn't very visible in the night sky (which it isn't) it won't be very visible during the eclipse. The eclipse does nothing to the comet, it just brings about a short, dark period making objects not visible in the day sky, such as planets, stars and comets, briefly visible during the day.

Pons-Brooks is not a spectacular comet, the eclipse won't change that.

We'll see.

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We drove 100 miles to be at the center of the eclipse in 2017. It was like a fair with T-shirts and food booths everywhere. The weather was perfect. We took the RV and made a day of it. Had a champagne/Bloody Mary brunch and for dinner we cooked steaks on the grill. I threatened to fall to my knees and start speaking in tongues during the eclipse but they said they'd leave me behind if I did. Some people are no fun. 😟

:lol:

 

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19 hours ago, Abramelin said:

We'll see.

Don't get your hopes up, and don't mistake the beautiful, long exposure, images taken by astrophotographers with what is actually visible to the naked eye.

I'm guessing that you haven't seen too many comets.

Don't take my word for it:

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Comet 12P/Pons-Brooks will make its return in 2024 and it is expected to reach its maximum brightness (potentially visible to the naked eye) during the month of April. With its closest approach occurring just a few days before a total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024, it presents a unique opportunity for skywatchers to potentially view the comet during the eclipse. However, since the comet's brightness can be unpredictable, there is no guarantee it will be visible, and viewers may need to use binoculars or telescopes to see it.

(My emphasis).

Source: The Sky Live

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Scientists Use NASA Data to Predict Solar Corona Before Eclipse

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Our Sun, like many stars, is adorned with a crown. It’s called a corona (Latin for “crown” or “wreath”) and consists of long, thread-like strands of plasma billowing out from the Sun’s surface. The powerful magnetic field of the Sun defines these strands, causing them to ripple and evolve their structures constantly. The strands are faint, however, so the only way to observe the corona with the naked eye is during a total solar eclipse.

In anticipation of the solar eclipse on April 8, 2024, scientists at Predictive Science are using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to predict what our Sun’s crown may look like on that day. What’s more, their model uses the computational efforts of NASA’s Pleiades Supercomputer to update its predictions in near real-time. This means that the model continuously updates its predictions as it ingests data beamed down from SDO, providing information as close to real-time as possible.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

I'm guessing that you haven't seen too many comets.

You're right: the only one I ever watched was Hale-Bopp.

And for the rest of your post: maybe I visited the wrong sites.

Thanks for the info, btw.

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