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Conspiracy Theorist Has An "Explanation" After Nibiru Failed To Destroy Earth Last Week


Waspie_Dwarf

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alien spaceship with a tractor beam?

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15 hours ago, Nicolette said:

Still not as ridiculous as when everybody thought the world was ending because the computers wouldn't  know what to do if they rolled over from 99 to 00 lmao.

Yep I was in 10 or 11th grade during that craze...good times :lol:

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On 8/21/2023 at 2:07 PM, Desertrat56 said:

Niburu?  Again?    :lol:   I thought new agers had given that one up.  

It orbits the sun, so yes, again and again and...

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3 hours ago, CrimsonKing said:

Yep I was in 10 or 11th grade during that craze...good times :lol:

We are the same age then. I couldn't figure out why that one had such a hysteria going it was the most ridiculous thing!

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24 minutes ago, Nicolette said:

We are the same age then. I couldn't figure out why that one had such a hysteria going it was the most ridiculous thing!

Jeez, you two make me feel old.  I was in my 40's when Y2K was a thing.   It was really stupid but people who worried about it would not let a computer expert explain why it wouldn't end the world.   I think you are the same age as my daughter.

Edited by Desertrat56
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40 minutes ago, Nicolette said:

We are the same age then. I couldn't figure out why that one had such a hysteria going it was the most ridiculous thing!

I never got it either,I remember a teacher or 2 trying to explain the direness of the situation and us all laughing about it,and them getting angry :lol:

We partied like hell that New Year's Eve :lol:

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22 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

Jeez, you two make me feel old.  I was in my 40's when Y2K was a thing.   It was really stupid but people who worried about it would not let a computer expert explain why it wouldn't end the world.   I think you are the same age as my daughter.

Your only as old as you feel...

Some days I feel 17,others 70 :lol:

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Y2K seems like a joke now because programs spent a literal decade preparing for it, rewriting finical and infrastructure software so there were no potential issues. 

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1 hour ago, Occupational Hubris said:

Y2K seems like a joke now because programs spent a literal decade preparing for it, rewriting finical and infrastructure software so there were no potential issues. 

Exactly.

It's like a doctor saying you need a heart transplant or you'll die in 5 years time
You have a heart transplant
6 years later you're still alive
And then you claim the doctor was obviously just scaremongering when he said you'll die ......  

But to be fair, most people are as capable of logical thought as a small whelk is at driving a tractor.

Y2K is a good example of identifying a potentially serious issue, and successfully working to avoid it.
 

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15 hours ago, CrimsonKing said:

I never got it either,I remember a teacher or 2 trying to explain the direness of the situation and us all laughing about it,and them getting angry :lol:

We partied like hell that New Year's Eve :lol:

Some people made a LOT of money from the fear of that one.  Even my boss had a meeting to discuss our strategy, since New years day was on Saturday that year I told him I will shut the network down on Friday night and come in Sunday to bring it back up again.   Total waste of my time but I did get paid overtime for it.    The only OS/software that had a problem was the banks and financial software.   My friend was a CFO of a Utah bank and she had all the computer hardware and software replaced 2 years before, she was able to justify the cost with Y2K (a valid issue for their ancient cobol software).  What was bad is that in 2000 the bank was sold to Wells Fargo and they replaced all the new stuff with their old crap, even swapped out the teller's monitors for really old IBM monitors (and the tellers had to share one per 3 or 4 people, instead of each of them having their own).    My friend was the only woman in management they kept but they demoted her from CFO to manager so she found another job.

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5 hours ago, Essan said:

Exactly.

It's like a doctor saying you need a heart transplant or you'll die in 5 years time
You have a heart transplant
6 years later you're still alive
And then you claim the doctor was obviously just scaremongering when he said you'll die ......  

But to be fair, most people are as capable of logical thought as a small whelk is at driving a tractor.

Y2K is a good example of identifying a potentially serious issue, and successfully working to avoid it.
 

Yep, it was scare mongering.  It was COBOL systems that had to be updated to allow more than 4 digits for  date (very short sighted) and most were updating the date issue 10 years before, like you said.  I don't know any other database OS that had that problem except the in the box book keeping software for PC's.   

Edited by Desertrat56
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16 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Jeez, you two make me feel old.  I was in my 40's when Y2K was a thing.   It was really stupid but people who worried about it would not let a computer expert explain why it wouldn't end the world.   

I was 28. The stupidity of that whole thing and how many people bought into it still to this day stays with me. A lot of its effect I think had to do with the fear mongering being spread by the superstitious about the changing of the millennium. The two became combined in a lot of people’s minds.

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On 8/21/2023 at 3:46 PM, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Buckner spent the week before Nibiru was meant to hit warning as many people as he could to seek shelter, telling his audience "few will survive", before one final "I AM HEADED FOR THE CAVES" tweet.

Still good on him for trying to help people when he thought danger was on the horizon. 

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6 minutes ago, ReadTheGreatControversyEGW said:

Still good on him for trying to help people when he thought danger was on the horizon. 

Sure. The kind of “help” you give screaming fire in a crowded theater when there’s no fire. Good on him for attempting to spread panic over nothing because of his own ignorance. The a-hole is lucky he didn’t get anyone hurt with his nonsense.

Bravo.

Edited by Antigonos
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On 8/24/2023 at 8:13 AM, Desertrat56 said:

Jeez, you two make me feel old.  I was in my 40's when Y2K was a thing.   It was really stupid but people who worried about it would not let a computer expert explain why it wouldn't end the world.   I think you are the same age as my daughter.

But Y2K was NOT a thing because those people who were responsible for systems maintenance took it seriously. People forget that a couple of developing nations WERE affected. And so was the US and other 'first world' nations, albeit in relatively minor ways:

https://www.orlandosentinel.com/2000/01/03/y2k-glitch-reported-at-nuclear-weapons-plant/

Edited to add a portion of the Wiki page detailing problems:

 

Quote

 

Problems that occurred on 1 January 2000 were generally regarded as minor.[59] Consequences did not always result exactly at midnight. Some programs were not active at that moment and problems would only show up when they were invoked. Not all problems recorded were directly linked to Y2K programming in a causality; minor technological glitches occur on a regular basis.

Reported problems include:

  • In Australia, bus ticket validation machines in two states failed to operate.[59]
  • In Japan:
    • machines in 13 train stations stopped dispensing tickets for a short time.[60]
    • in Ishikawa, the Shika Nuclear Power Plant reported that radiation monitoring equipment failed at a few seconds after midnight. Officials said there was no risk to the public, and no excess radiation was found at the plant.[61][62]
    • at two minutes past midnight, the telecommunications carrier Osaka Media Port found date management mistakes in their network. A spokesman said they had resolved the issue by 02:43 and did not interfere with operations.[63]
    • NTT Mobile Communications Network (NTT Docomo), Japan's largest cellular operator, reported that some models of mobile telephones were deleting new messages received, rather than the older messages, as the memory filled up.[63]
  • In South Korea:
    • at midnight, 902 ondol heating systems and water heating failed at an apartment building near Seoul; the ondol systems were down for 19 hours and would only work when manually controlled, while the water heating took 24 hours to restart.[64]
    • two hospitals in Gyeonggi Province reported malfunctions with equipment measuring bone marrow and patient intake forms, with one accidentally registering a newborn as having been born in 1900, four people in the city of Daegu received medical bills with dates in 1900, and a court in Suwon sent out notifications containing a trial date for 4 January 1900.[64][65][66]
    • a video store in Gwangju accidentally generated a late fee of approximately 8 million won (approximately $7,000 US dollars) because the store's computer determined a tape rental to be 100 years overdue. South Korean authorities stated the computer was a model anticipated to be incompatible with the year rollover, and had not undergone the software upgrades necessary to make it compliant.[67]
  • In Hong Kong, police breathalyzers failed at midnight.[68]
  • In Jiangsu, China, taxi meters failed at midnight.[69]
  • In Egypt, three dialysis machines briefly failed.[60]
  • In Greece, approximately 30,000 cash registers, amounting to around 10% of the country's total, printed receipts with dates in 1900.[70]
  • In Denmark, the first baby born on 1 January was recorded as being 100 years old.[71]
  • In France, the national weather forecasting service, Météo-France, said a Y2K bug made the date on a webpage show a map with Saturday's weather forecast as "01/01/19100".[59] Additionally, the government reported that a Y2K glitch rendered one of their Syracuse satellite systems incapable of recognizing onboard malfunctions.[64][72]
  • In Germany:
    • at the Deutsche Oper Berlin, the payroll system interpreted the new year to be 1900 and determined the ages of employees' children by the last two digits of their years of birth, causing it to wrongly withhold government childcare subsidies in paychecks. To reinstate the subsidies, accountants had to reset the operating system's year to 1999.[73]
    • a bank accidentally transferred 12 million Deutsche Marks (equivalent to $6.2 million) to a customer and presented a statement with the date 30 December 1899. The bank quickly fixed the incorrect transfer.[71][74]
  • In Italy, courthouse computers in Venice and Naples showed an upcoming release date for some prisoners as 10 January 1900, while other inmates wrongly showed up as having 100 additional years on their sentences.[69][68]
  • In Norway, a day care center for kindergarteners in Oslo offered a spot to a 105 year old woman because the citizen's registry only showed the last two digits of citizens' years of birth.[75]
  • In Spain, a worker received a notice for an industrial tribunal in Murcia which listed the event date as 3 February 1900.[59]
  • In Sweden, the main hospital in Uppsala, a hospital in Lund, and two regional hospitals in Karlstad and Linkoping reported that machines used for reading electrocardiogram information failed to operate, although the hospitals stated it had no effect on patient health.[64][76]
  • In Sheffield, United Kingdom, a Y2K bug that was not discovered and fixed until 24 May caused computers to miscalculate the ages of pregnant mothers, which led to 154 patients receiving incorrect risk assessments for having a child with Down syndrome. As a direct result two abortions were carried out, and four babies with Down syndrome were also born to mothers who had been told they were in the low-risk group.[77]
  • In Brazil, at the Port of Santos, computers which had been upgraded in July 1999 to be Y2K compliant could not read three-year customs registrations generated in their previous system once the year rolled over. Santos said this affected registrations from before June 1999 that companies had not updated, which Santos estimated was approximately 20,000, and that when the problem became apparent on 10 January they were able to fix individual registrations, "in a matter of minutes".[78] A computer at Viracopos International Airport in São Paulo state also experienced this glitch, which temporarily halted cargo unloading.[78]
  • In Jamaica, in the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation, 8 computerized traffic lights at major intersections stopped working. Officials stated these lights were part of a set of 35 traffic lights known to be Y2K non-compliant, and that all 35 were already slated for replacement.[79]
  • In the United States:
    • the US Naval Observatory, which runs the master clock that keeps the country's official time, gave the date on its website as 1 Jan 19100.[80]
    • the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives could not register new firearms dealers for 5 days because their computers failed to recognize dates on applications.[81][82]
    • 150 Delaware Lottery racino slot machines stopped working.[59]
    • In New York, a video store accidentally generated a $91,250 late fee because the store computer determined a tape rental was 100 years overdue.[83]
    • In Tennessee, the Y-12 National Security Complex stated that a Y2K glitch caused an unspecified malfunction in a system for determining the weight and composition of nuclear substances at a nuclear weapons plant, although the United States Department of Energy stated they were still able to keep track of all material. It was resolved within three hours, no one at the plant was injured, and the plant continued carrying out its normal functions.[83][84]
    • In Chicago, for one day the Chicago Federal Reserve Bank could not transfer $700,000 from tax revenue; the problem was fixed the following day. Additionally, another bank in Chicago could not handle electronic Medicare payments until January 6, during which time the bank had to rely on sending processed claims on diskettes.[85]
    • In New Mexico, the New Mexico Motor Vehicle Division was temporarily unable to issue new driver's licenses.[86]
    • The campaign website for United States presidential candidate Al Gore gave the date as 3 January 19100 for a short time.[86]
    • Godiva Chocolatier reported that cash registers in its American outlets failed to operate. They first became aware of and determined the source of the problem on 2 January, and immediately began distributing a patch. A spokesman reported they that restored all functionality to most of the affected registers by the end of that day and had fixed the rest by noon on 3 January.[87][88]
  • The credit card companies MasterCard and Visa reported that, as a direct result of the Y2K glitch, for weeks after the year rollover a small percentage of customers were being charged multiple times for transactions.[89]
  • Microsoft reported that, after the year rolled over, Hotmail e-mails sent in October 1999 or earlier showed up as having been sent in 2099, although this did not affect the e-mail's contents or the ability to send and receive e-mails.[90]

 

Edited by Obviousman
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6 hours ago, Obviousman said:

But Y2K was NOT a thing because those people who were responsible for systems maintenance took it seriously. People forget that a couple of developing nations WERE affected. And so was the US and other 'first world' nations, albeit in relatively minor ways:

https://www.orlandosentinel.com/2000/01/03/y2k-glitch-reported-at-nuclear-weapons-plant/

Edited to add a portion of the Wiki page detailing problems:

 

Yes, we took it seriously 20 years before hand Except for the quicken, and other financial database systems based on COBOL.   Banks didn't take it seriously until 1998, most credit unions already had new software that eliminated the issues.   But the story was that the computers being used for the electrial grid would go down, and that was stupid because of the type of systems did not have that problem.  It was a marketing in fear gimmick.

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On 8/22/2023 at 10:51 PM, Nicolette said:

Still not as ridiculous as when everybody thought the world was ending because the computers wouldn't  know what to do if they rolled over from 99 to 00 lmao.

Y2K

Alex Jones made a mint with his crankery and survival supply business.

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