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New evidence discovered at alleged resting place of Noah's Ark in Turkey


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I think the Durupinar site gets discovered by new idiots every couple of years.  It's a natural rock formation.  As for finding seaside materials on mountains... It happens all the time.  Most mountains have compacted and been pushed up from super-ancient sea beds by the movement of the continental plates over millions of years.

Edited by Saru
Changed 'this site' to 'the Durupinar site' to avoid confusion.
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3 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

I think the Durupinar site gets discovered by new idiots every couple of years.

Agreed. I think this is the 4th time in my life I've seen an "ark discovered" story. Must be good money in publishing tasty stories. 

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There is actually a documentary about this one, and they found a lot of wooden logs remains that strengthened the story. 

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1 hour ago, qxcontinuum said:

There is actually a documentary about this one, and they found a lot of wooden logs remains that strengthened the story. 

Believe it if you want, but the claims about fossilized wood have proven to be false before too.  I get the sense that Durupinar has been mis-identified as Noah's Ark for centuries.  Face facts.  There would be immense global evidence in the geological record of Noah's flood if it ever happened.  There is no such evidence.  If we suppose that Noah's Flood occurred at the end of the last Ice Age, which is at least plausible, then it might relate to the mass flooding of the Tigris-Euprhates River system and the creation of the Persian Gulf.  That was the biggest flooding event in the Middle East, and it would have been before recorded history, but might be recorded in oral history as the Utnapishtim's Flood myth, which is the template for the Noah myth.  What we can say with certainty is that the flood waters simply could not rise to the level of Mount Ararat, let alone anywhere near its summit. where the Durupinar site is located.  The claim is simply impossible.  Durupinar is a boat-shaped natural formation which was likely known and incorporated into the myth very early on by the people of the region.  This happens all the time. For example:  In Australian Aboriginal myths, the Koories read the tracks of mythological creatures like the Rainbow Serpent or the ancestor spirit of all Kangaroos leaving their tracks and foraging marks on the land.  The Norse used to see the faces and limbs of fallen giants and the acts of gods in their landscape and they became part of their myths too.  In the pre-scientific world, the mythologizing of the landscape was a very normal practice, and that is what Durupinar is.

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5 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

Believe it if you want, but the claims about fossilized wood have proven to be false before too.  I get the sense that Durupinar has been mis-identified as Noah's Ark for centuries.  Face facts.  There would be immense global evidence in the geological record of Noah's flood if it ever happened.  There is no such evidence.  If we suppose that Noah's Flood occurred at the end of the last Ice Age, which is at least plausible, then it might relate to the mass flooding of the Tigris-Euprhates River system and the creation of the Persian Gulf.  That was the biggest flooding event in the Middle East, and it would have been before recorded history, but might be recorded in oral history as the Utnapishtim's Flood myth, which is the template for the Noah myth.  What we can say with certainty is that the flood waters simply could not rise to the level of Mount Ararat, let alone anywhere near its summit. where the Durupinar site is located.  The claim is simply impossible.  Durupinar is a boat-shaped natural formation which was likely known and incorporated into the myth very early on by the people of the region.  This happens all the time. For example:  In Australian Aboriginal myths, the Koories read the tracks of mythological creatures like the Rainbow Serpent or the ancestor spirit of all Kangaroos leaving their tracks and foraging marks on the land.  The Norse used to see the faces and limbs of fallen giants and the acts of gods in their landscape and they became part of their myths too.  In the pre-scientific world, the mythologizing of the landscape was a very normal practice, and that is what Durupinar is.

@Doug1066 suggested it was misidentified for a few thousand years.

Not too surprising though. 

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7 hours ago, qxcontinuum said:

There is actually a documentary about this one, and they found a lot of wooden logs remains that strengthened the story. 

Nothing strengthens the story. The ancient Jews borrowed it during the Babylonian Captivity and the original ark was made of reeds. 

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I'll believe it only when they find 5,000 year old Platypus dung 😛

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1 minute ago, Essan said:

I'll believe it only when they find 5,000 year old Platypus dung 😛

I made a joke with a Bible literalist about digging up beaver and bison **** under Mt. Ararat. It went over their head. 

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lol people still believing this crap 

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On 10/28/2023 at 11:17 PM, Alchopwn said:

Believe it if you want, but the claims about fossilized wood have proven to be false before too.  I get the sense that Durupinar has been mis-identified as Noah's Ark for centuries.  Face facts.  There would be immense global evidence in the geological record of Noah's flood if it ever happened.  There is no such evidence.  If we suppose that Noah's Flood occurred at the end of the last Ice Age, which is at least plausible, then it might relate to the mass flooding of the Tigris-Euprhates River system and the creation of the Persian Gulf.  That was the biggest flooding event in the Middle East, and it would have been before recorded history, but might be recorded in oral history as the Utnapishtim's Flood myth, which is the template for the Noah myth.  What we can say with certainty is that the flood waters simply could not rise to the level of Mount Ararat, let alone anywhere near its summit. where the Durupinar site is located.  The claim is simply impossible.  Durupinar is a boat-shaped natural formation which was likely known and incorporated into the myth very early on by the people of the region.  This happens all the time. For example:  In Australian Aboriginal myths, the Koories read the tracks of mythological creatures like the Rainbow Serpent or the ancestor spirit of all Kangaroos leaving their tracks and foraging marks on the land.  The Norse used to see the faces and limbs of fallen giants and the acts of gods in their landscape and they became part of their myths too.  In the pre-scientific world, the mythologizing of the landscape was a very normal practice, and that is what Durupinar is.

The only sub-fossil wood I know of from Mount Ararat was dated to 1600 AD.

I suspect Durupinar is the source of the Noah's Arc story.

There is evidence of a titanic flood about 2310 BC.  It is attested by varve counts from Lake Accessa, the Palermo Stone, the writings of Manetho and Egyptian records of a massive flood during the First Dynasty.

Prior to that flood, there were possibly two superfloods between 3600 BC and 2310 BC.  There was a trio of super floods at 4250 BC, 4050 BC and 3850 BC.

There may have been three superfloods during the Northgrippian.  And 5 more during the Younger Dryas.  Before that, the record gets pretty sketchy.

The Persian Gulf is a geosyncline, millions of years old, containing 30,000 feet of sediment, according to oil well logs.

Doug

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