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NASA to test its secretive X-59 supersonic plane in 2024


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  • The title was changed to NASA to test its secretive X-59 supersonic plane in 2024
 

I'm going to guess that this has already been achieved for the military for planes we have no idea exist

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Exactly, @OverSword. What they show us is really yesterday's dark news lol 

However... this is still cool. And they say the body of the craft was parts of other crafts hobbled together? Whatever works.

 

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These things will be $14.99 on Temu in 48 hours.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 10/31/2023 at 7:46 PM, OverSword said:

I'm going to guess that this has already been achieved for the military for planes we have no idea exist

That seems highly unlikely. This technology has questionable military benefit, but large benefits for civilian flight.

If the military had this technology and wanted to keep it secret then NASA would not be allowed to carry out this research. If, on the other hand, the military has this technology and feels it is time for it to be in civilian hands they would simply declassify it and save $millions wasted in duplicated research.

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NASA’s X-59 Goes from Green to Red, White, and Blue

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NASA’s X-59 quiet supersonic aircraft continues to make progress, most recently moving to the paint barn at Lockheed Martin Skunk Works’ facility in Palmdale, California.

The X-59’s paint scheme will include a mainly white body, a NASA “sonic blue” underside, and red accents on the wings. The paint doesn’t just add cosmetic value. It also serves a purpose – the paint helps to protect the aircraft from moisture and corrosion and includes key safety markings to assist with ground and flight operations.

The aircraft made the move to the paint barn on Nov. 14, 2023. Once it is painted, the team will take final measurements of its weight and exact shape to improve computer modeling.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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11 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

That seems highly unlikely. This technology has questionable military benefit, but large benefits for civilian flight.

If the military had this technology and wanted to keep it secret then NASA would not be allowed to carry out this research. If, on the other hand, the military has this technology and feels it is time for it to be in civilian hands they would simply declassify it and save $millions wasted in duplicated research.

A stealth bomber with muffled supersonic ability would have questionable military benefits?

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56 minutes ago, OverSword said:

A stealth bomber with muffled supersonic ability would have questionable military benefits?

How would muffling a sound only heard AFTER the vehicle is long past have any benefit?

The point of stealth technology is to prevent the aircraft being detected by radar and to prevent enemy weapons systems being able to lock on to that vehicle. Muffling the sonic boom would not help that at all.

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22 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

How would muffling a sound only heard AFTER the vehicle is long past have any benefit?

The point of stealth technology is to prevent the aircraft being detected by radar and to prevent enemy weapons systems being able to lock on to that vehicle. Muffling the sonic boom would not help that at all.

Because people may report a sonic boom and alert their defenses

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42 minutes ago, OverSword said:

Because people may report a sonic boom and alert their defenses

By which time, travelling at supersonic speed, it's many miles away (it already was many miles away before the people on the ground heard the sonic boom) and still undetectable by radar.

None of this answers this point I made:

13 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

If the military had this technology and wanted to keep it secret then NASA would not be allowed to carry out this research. If, on the other hand, the military has this technology and feels it is time for it to be in civilian hands they would simply declassify it and save $millions wasted in duplicated research.

Your argument (which you admit was based on a guess) just doesn't stand up to logic... although, I will concede, neither does the military mind at times... military intelligence, possibly the greatest oxymoron in human history.

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8 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

neither does the military mind at times... military intelligence, possibly the greatest oxymoron in human history.

And this is the actual reason I believe this technology probably already exists.

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  • 4 weeks later...

 

 

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  • 5 weeks later...
 

 

 

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NASA, Lockheed Martin Reveal X-59 Quiet Supersonic Aircraft

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p23-171-010-16x9-no-bug.thumb.webp.ccecfc473feae5ebc539efa9810c55cd.webp

 

NASA’s X-59 quiet supersonic research aircraft sits on the apron outside Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works facility at dawn in Palmdale, California. The X-59 is the centerpiece of NASA’s Quesst mission, which seeks to address one of the primary challenges to supersonic flight over land by making sonic booms quieter.
Lockheed Martin Skunk Works

NASA and Lockheed Martin formally debuted the agency’s X-59 quiet supersonic aircraft Friday. Using this one-of-a-kind experimental airplane, NASA aims to gather data that could revolutionize air travel, paving the way for a new generation of commercial aircraft that can travel faster than the speed of sound.

“This is a major accomplishment made possible only through the hard work and ingenuity from NASA and the entire X-59 team,” said NASA Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy. “In just a few short years we’ve gone from an ambitious concept to reality. NASA’s X-59 will help change the way we travel, bringing us closer together in much less time.”

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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The technology maybe great, but I see little benefit in using this prototype for commercial use. Perhaps the technology will be used to make a commercial transporter.

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Soon --for transportation purposes of course, they'll be strapping people to missiles and rockets.

 

 

 

eidt / edit great post by the way 

 

 , , , ,  --nosy

Edited by Nosy.Matters
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3 hours ago, Sgt84801 said:

The technology maybe great, but I see little benefit in using this prototype for commercial use. Perhaps the technology will be used to make a commercial transporter.

That is the entire point of this aircraft. It is built entirely to test technology that can be transferred to future passenger planes. That is why you build experimental prototypes in the first place.

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1 hour ago, Nosy.Matters said:

Soon --for transportation purposes of course, they'll be strapping people to missiles and rockets.

SpaceX has proposed doing precisely that with their Starship,

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On 11/16/2023 at 1:11 PM, Waspie_Dwarf said:

By which time, travelling at supersonic speed, it's many miles away (it already was many miles away before the people on the ground heard the sonic boom) and still undetectable by radar.

None of this answers this point I made:

Your argument (which you admit was based on a guess) just doesn't stand up to logic... although, I will concede, neither does the military mind at times... military intelligence, possibly the greatest oxymoron in human history.

This would have tremendous military benefit. Spy planes for example are designed to never be detected, not just be miles away when detected. The less the enemy questions the better.

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It's a way to bring back what we had with Concord. It was indeed popular. There is a tremendous civilian market for this. Very clever.

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On 11/1/2023 at 5:46 AM, OverSword said:

I'm going to guess that this has already been achieved for the military for planes we have no idea exist

Commercial airlines have been working on it for years.

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/business-44795639.amp

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  • 4 months later...
 

NASA’s X-59 Passes Milestone Toward Safe First Flight

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image.thumb.jpeg.fa393c291085140faa49598389001e5c.jpeg

 

NASA and Lockheed Martin test pilots inspect the painted X-59 as it sits on the ramp at Lockheed Martin Skunk Works in Palmdale, California. The X-59 is the centerpiece of NASA’s Quesst mission, which seeks to solve one of the major barriers to supersonic flight over land, currently banned in the United States, by making sonic booms quieter.
NASA / Steve Freeman

NASA has taken the next step toward verifying the airworthiness for its quiet supersonic X-59 aircraft with the completion of a milestone review that will allow it to progress toward flight. 

A Flight Readiness Review board composed of independent experts from across NASA has completed a study of the X-59 project team’s approach to safety for the public and staff during ground and flight testing. The review board looked in detail at the project team’s analysis of potential hazards, focusing on safety and risk identification. 

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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