Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

The rise of bodies isolated and decomposing in England and Wales


Eldorado

Recommended Posts

A study has raised concerns about the increasing number of people in England and Wales who have died but are discovered so late their bodies have already decomposed.

Published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, the study highlighted potential links between growing isolation and these types of deaths - even before the Covid pandemic.

It was conducted by a team led by Dr Lucinda Hiam of the University of Oxford and including histopathology registrar Dr Theodore Estrin-Serlui of Imperial College NHS Healthcare Trust who analysed data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), identifying deaths where bodies were found in a state of decomposition.

MSN

A deathly silence: why has the number of people found decomposed in England and Wales been rising?

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/01410768231209001

  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

That is one of the saddest things I can imagine.  To be so alone and forgotten that no one even misses you for such a long time.  :( 

  • Like 7
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think modern societies need to invest in a technology that monitors vital signs and tracks elderly people living alone, calling for help if they experience a medical emergency.  Something subcutaneous would likely be good, so they don't have to fiddle with it or remove it.

Also the "rise of bodies" described in the title had me concerned about bloated corpses squalidly rising out of the muddy soil, so a little misleading, lol.  I would suggest the us of "in" rather than "of" in the title may remove the confusion.

Edited by Alchopwn
  • Like 2
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

I think modern societies need to invest in a technology that monitors vital signs and tracks elderly people living alone, calling for help if they experience a medical emergency.  Something subcutaneous would likely be good, so they don't have to fiddle with it or remove it.

Also the "rise of bodies" described in the title had me concerned about bloated corpses squalidly rising out of the muddy soil, so a little misleading, lol.  I would suggest the us of "in" rather than "of" in the title may remove the confusion.

That would be some sort of Orwellian nightmare come true. Subcutaneous tracking. No, no, no, no, no.

Awful idea, poorly thought through.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Much to be said for the old fashioned milk man, milk left on the doorstep would trigger folks to look for a problem.

The same could be said of the postman and window cleaner visiting a home.

I would rather find a way of reimbursing these folks for keeping their eyes open than install tech to monitor people in their homes.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, OpenMindedSceptic said:

That would be some sort of Orwellian nightmare come true. Subcutaneous tracking. No, no, no, no, no.

Awful idea, poorly thought through.

The system would be no more invasive than a modern contraceptive injection.  The idea is that it would be voluntary, as a means of insuring that people are alive and well, possibly as part of a subscription service attached to medical insurance.  The aim is, if you have a medical episode, the device detects it, then contacts family  and sends appropriate emergency services.  Admittedly it might also be used to track demented old people who wander off from their retirement facility.  It might be nicer than having people lying about in their house decaying into their furniture in a vile puddle while their pets go unfed... almost...

In any case, we use trackers on our pets so they don't get lost, and we also allow pets to be painlessly euthanized.  Why are we so much nicer to pets than people?

Edited by Alchopwn
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

The system would be no more invasive than a modern contraceptive injection.  The idea is that it would be voluntary, as a means of insuring that people are alive and well,

Voluntary actions like this tend to become unavoidable after they come into widespread use.  I'm thinking of home computers or cell phones.  They began as a cool novelty but a decade later it's extremely difficult to function in society if you refuse to have/use either.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/28/2023 at 2:17 AM, Alchopwn said:

I think modern societies need to invest in a technology that monitors vital signs and tracks elderly people living alone, calling for help if they experience a medical emergency.  Something subcutaneous would likely be good, so they don't have to fiddle with it or remove it.

Your idea is not too different from medical alert systems already available for seniors (and others). Users wear a help button (in the form of a pendant or bracelet) they can press in the event of a medical emergency, such as a fall. They are then connected to a monitoring station via a base stationed in their homes. Someone from the monitoring station will respond to determine what the emergency is and will contact appropriate emergency services (such as an ambulance) or a family member. The same if they do not get a response. There is also daily monitoring where they check in with the user once every 24 hours. Again, if there is no response, the same follow up protocol follows. GPS systems are also available.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, and-then said:

Voluntary actions like this tend to become unavoidable after they come into widespread use.  I'm thinking of home computers or cell phones.  They began as a cool novelty but a decade later it's extremely difficult to function in society if you refuse to have/use either.

Well, I can still see a huge argument for having the medical system (a) know where you are and (b) know if you are having a medical emergency so they can (c) send help.  Unless I was in Australia of course, because their ambulance drivers always empty your wallet when they check your ID.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

Your idea is not too different from medical alert systems already available for seniors (and others). Users wear a help button (in the form of a pendant or bracelet) they can press in the event of a medical emergency, such as a fall. They are then connected to a monitoring station via a base stationed in their homes. Someone from the monitoring station will respond to determine what the emergency is and will contact appropriate emergency services (such as an ambulance) or a family member. The same if they do not get a response. There is also daily monitoring where they check in with the user once every 24 hours. Again, if there is no response, the same follow up protocol follows. GPS systems are also available.

Yes, I know about those.  The problem with them is that they get taken off or forgotten.  More so as the mind goes.  They are also fiddly for clumsy old fingers at advanced ages.  To have something automatically detecting an emergency IN your body that sends the alert would be preferable imo.  No doubt Christian Fundamentalists will begin to hiss about the number of the beast and not being able to buy and sell, of course, but let's face facts, we need something like this to prevent single people dying without medical assistance and being eaten by their starving pets while their corpse rots into their armchair.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Alchopwn said:

Yes, I know about those.  The problem with them is that they get taken off or forgotten.  More so as the mind goes.  They are also fiddly for clumsy old fingers at advanced ages.

Even if they are taken off or forgotten, the monitoring stations contact individuals once every 24 hours and if a reply is not received, they will, as I mentioned, contact family members (or emergency services). As I see it, there are only two drawbacks. The first is the cost. Medical alert systems could cost anywhere between $50-$90 per month, and whilst that's not overly expensive, it's still not affordable for everyone, especially seniors on a fixed income. The second problem is response time. An injured person might, for example, have to wait hours before anyone at the monitoring station becomes aware of a problem (although I think there are devices that are sensitive enough to detect things like a hard fall).

Whilst your idea is well meaning, it's important to understand the risks involved in micro-chipping humans. Things to be concerned about include medical complications such as adverse tissue reaction, chip migration, and electromagnetic interference, among other things. Other concerns include privacy, hacking, as well as intrusive surveillance. That's not to suggest that micro-chipping is not without potential benefits. Ultimately (if such advances are eventually made) it will have to come down to personal choice.

Medical scientists by the way, are working on a number of different medical implants, including in-body GPS implant sensors for the tracking of things like tumour movements. Indeed, there are a great many other potential benefits of medical micro-chip implants, but I suspect that data privacy and health safety concerns will outweigh them for the most part.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Kittens Are Jerks said:

Even if they are taken off or forgotten, the monitoring stations contact individuals once every 24 hours and if a reply is not received, they will, as I mentioned, contact family members (or emergency services).

Once every 24 hours?  It takes under 15 mins to die if you can't breathe.  That's cold comfort if you ask me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 
11 minutes ago, Alchopwn said:

Once every 24 hours?  It takes under 15 mins to die if you can't breathe.  That's cold comfort if you ask me.

Yes it's cold comfort, but the development of micro-chips that are able to track and monitor a myriad of complex health issues and medical emergencies is a long way off. Microchip implant technology that can provide medical history and identification for Alzheimer's patients who wander is available, but there is nothing more advanced that I'm aware of. Anyway. whilst medical alert services may not be perfect, they don't come with any of the potentially serious medical and other downsides of micro-chip implants, so there's that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.