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Brits issued urgent warning not to eat tomatoes this December


pellinore

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It's a pity we have decided to outsource our farming.

Brits issued urgent warning not to eat tomatoes this December.

An academic shared a list of foods we should avoid this winter, with tomatoes taking top spot.

Tomatoes have topped a list of foods to avoid this December and January in a bid to cut back on carbon emissions.

An academic has shared a list of foods to avoid this winter, including fresh tomatoes, lettuce, asparagus and strawberries due to environmental concerns.

The fruit and veg are often flown on highly carbon-intensive freight planes which results in huge carbon emissions over winter, thus contributing to global warming, reports Yorkshire Live.

Brits issued urgent warning not to eat tomatoes this December | UK | News | Express.co.uk

Edited by pellinore
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I don't usually eat "fresh" tomatoes after September but it has naught to do with carbon emissions.  With the price of food these days there's no point paying for a tomato that tastes like cardboard.  I agree that outsourcing farming is utter folly in the world we live in today.  

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1 hour ago, pellinore said:

Tomatoes have topped a list of foods to avoid this December and January in a bid to cut back on carbon emissions.

:rolleyes:

People of England.  Please refrain from eating any foods over the holidays as each one of them generate carbon emissions at some point before they enter your gullet.  Thank you, signed the crazies :yes:

 

 

Edited by OverSword
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3 hours ago, OverSword said:

:rolleyes:

People of England.  Please refrain from eating any foods over the holidays as each one of them generate carbon emissions at some point before they enter your gullet.  Thank you, signed the crazies :yes:

It's a bit ridiculous, isn't it? It makes perfect sense for a country not to outsource its food supply (as Jacob Rees Mogg advocates) as an interrupted food supply will lead to shortages. But out of season fruit has always been imported to countries, it hardly warrants an "urgent warning" and a newspaper article. In any case, supply and demand economics will limit consumption.  Where the UK has gone wrong is that it has abandoned farming, as a deliberate policy, so that many polytunnel fruit and veg farmers have closed up shop, leaving us reliant on European and North African agricultural produce.

So far, the government has only negotiated trade deals with two huge food exporters – New Zealand and Australia – but already the industry is bracing itself for the pain to come. “They are terrible deals for British farmers,” says Webster. “Every year the quotas go up, it means the supermarkets, which only care about the cheapest product, buy the imported products. Which means we either sell to them at a loss or we give up farming. It is no surprise that so many are giving up farming – who wants to produce food as a charity?”

If you think that is bad, wait until the government really gets going. Deals with countries with massive food surpluses like Brazil and Argentina will force down agricultural prices, and it would be even worse if the UK ever negotiated a deal with the US. It is just waiting to export billions of dollars’ worth of heavily subsidised agricultural produce into the UK.

The sacrificial lambs of Brexit - The New European

Edited by pellinore
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6 minutes ago, pellinore said:

It's a bit ridiculous, isn't it? It makes perfect sense for a country not to outsource its food supply (as Jacob Rees Mogg advocates) as an interrupted food supply will lead to shortages. But out of season fruit has always been imported to countries, it hardly warrants an "urgent warning" and a newspaper article. In any case, supply and demand economics will limit consumption.  Where the UK has gone wrong is that it has abandoned its farmers as a deliberate policy, so that hundreds of acres of polytunnel fruit and veg as their farmers have closed up shop, leaving us reliant on European and North African agricultural produce.

I know what you mean.  Here we now have blueberries year round imported from Brazil, and these are monster blueberries nearly the size of grapes.  Those used to be only at a certain time of year.  I'm not convinced that hectares of rainforest are worth the exchange for year round blueberries.

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5 hours ago, pellinore said:

It's a pity we have decided to outsource our farming.

Around the year 2000 the U.S. government commissioned a study on the small English farm system and why it was so successful and the premise was that the U.S. government was worried about the domino effect should our large corporate farms start failing. 

Growing up in the 60's almost everyone had livestock on their farms and then the switch to grain farming and now you can rarely find any livestock anywhere in rural America and I'm not talking about the large farms just the small mom and pop farms that used to dot the landscape as they're mostly gone. 

However there has been an upsurge in organic farm production in recent years but buyer beware I've seen whole processed chicken going for $9 a pound. 

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8 minutes ago, Buzz_Light_Year said:

Around the year 2000 the U.S. government commissioned a study on the small English farm system and why it was so successful and the premise was that the U.S. government was worried about the domino effect should our large corporate farms start failing. 

Growing up in the 60's almost everyone had livestock on their farms and then the switch to grain farming and now you can rarely find any livestock anywhere in rural America and I'm not talking about the large farms just the small mom and pop farms that used to dot the landscape as they're mostly gone. 

However there has been an upsurge in organic farm production in recent years but buyer beware I've seen whole processed chicken going for $9 a pound. 

It always comes down to the bottom dollar. The huge factory farms where cows, pigs and chickens live in tiny cages, unable to move even a limb, for all of their brief lives, are disgraceful, but the produce from the ethical small farms are too expensive for most people. In the UK, chicken for example (the world's most popular meat protein) ranges in price from a 1.9kg bird with no questions asked at £3.77, to an organic bird of 2-2.5kg which has had a free-range and probably a pretty normal life going for £18. £18 for a chicken you have to roast yourself! KFC is probably cheaper pound for pound. Most people simply can't afford it.

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1 hour ago, pellinore said:

It always comes down to the bottom dollar. The huge factory farms where cows, pigs and chickens live in tiny cages, unable to move even a limb, for all of their brief lives, are disgraceful, but the produce from the ethical small farms are too expensive for most people. In the UK, chicken for example (the world's most popular meat protein) ranges in price from a 1.9kg bird with no questions asked at £3.77, to an organic bird of 2-2.5kg which has had a free-range and probably a pretty normal life going for £18. £18 for a chicken you have to roast yourself! KFC is probably cheaper pound for pound. Most people simply can't afford it.

You're right there.

Back in the 80's I was looking into converting our old dairy barn into a chicken broiler barn and after researching it the restrictions were too great. Unless I had a contract with a slaughter house I could only legally raise 1,000 birds a year and then I could only sell them live on the hoof or I would have to get USDA approved to slaughter them myself or have them processed at a butcher shop and have the customer pay for the butchering and that was cost prohibitive.

I still did a test run with 100 birds and kept meticulous records as to cost (not counting my time and fuel) and I had $1.79 a piece in each bird at approx 3lbs apiece and chicken was selling for .48 cents a pound then so I would have lost about .35 cents on each bird. If you can't buy in bulk forget it.

Hogs, Chickens, Turkeys and some cattle are all corporate raised here with the likes of Tyson, Purdue, Smithfield and others. Of course there are still some backyard farmers but they are few.  

I've always said people if they can should raise their own meat and vegetables. 

One more thing I'll pass on is the amount of outright fraud in the so called "Free Range" chicken and egg market as the rules are fairly lax on what can be considered free range. You're mostly paying more for the label if you don't know exactly where your chickens and eggs come from. 

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8 hours ago, pellinore said:

It's a pity we have decided to outsource our farming.

Brits issued urgent warning not to eat tomatoes this December.

An academic shared a list of foods we should avoid this winter, with tomatoes taking top spot.

Tomatoes have topped a list of foods to avoid this December and January in a bid to cut back on carbon emissions.

An academic has shared a list of foods to avoid this winter, including fresh tomatoes, lettuce, asparagus and strawberries due to environmental concerns.

The fruit and veg are often flown on highly carbon-intensive freight planes which results in huge carbon emissions over winter, thus contributing to global warming, reports Yorkshire Live.

Brits issued urgent warning not to eat tomatoes this December | UK | News | Express.co.uk

I wouldn't say outsourcing isn't the problem so much as natural growing seasons.  The seasons are reversed in the southern hemisphere, so when it is winter in the UK, it is summer in Brazil.  With global shipping we can eat produce year round.  Yes, the down side is that it has to be shipped from the other side of the world.  But I don't blame outsourcing- well at least not here in Iowa where it is a farming state.  England might have indeed outsourced all it's food for all I know.  

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15 hours ago, pellinore said:

An academic has shared a list of foods to avoid this winter, including fresh tomatoes, lettuce, asparagus and strawberries due to environmental concerns.

All we will be eating soon is meal worms and cockroaches. People need to stop breeding, that's the environmental concern.

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