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Discovery of planet too big for its sun throws off solar system formation models


Waspie_Dwarf

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Discovery of planet too big for its sun throws off solar system formation models

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The discovery of a planet that is far too massive for its sun is calling into question what was previously understood about the formation of planets and their solar systems, according to Penn State researchers.

In a paper published online today (Nov. 30) in the journal Science, researchers report the discovery of a planet more than 13 times as massive as Earth orbiting the “ultracool” star LHS 3154, which itself is nine times less massive than the sun. The mass ratio of the newly found planet with its host star is more than 100 times higher than that of Earth and the sun.

Read More: ➡️ Pennsylvania State University

 

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Maybe I missed it but how does a planet with so much mass even form if the dwarf star is presumably just that..a weal star rather than a dying one? If it is that massive then wouldn't the gravity it generates also be quite phenomenal?

I am assuming that the gravitational field of the dwarf star is relatively weak compared to our sun so wouldn't the planet instead slowly draw the star to itself faster than the slingshot effect produced by both bodies?

Sorry for the un-scientific sounding questions. I am not well versed in such areas.

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13 hours ago, Bendy Demon said:

Maybe I missed it but how does a planet with so much mass even form if the dwarf star is presumably just that..a weal star rather than a dying one? If it is that massive then wouldn't the gravity it generates also be quite phenomenal?

I am assuming that the gravitational field of the dwarf star is relatively weak compared to our sun so wouldn't the planet instead slowly draw the star to itself faster than the slingshot effect produced by both bodies?

Sorry for the un-scientific sounding questions. I am not well versed in such areas.

A gas giant wouldn't have as strong of a gravitational pull as you think and if they are in a orbital resonance nothing is getting flung anywhere but I'm just guessing. @Waspie_Dwarf correct me if I'm wrong. 

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I think there are quite a few options that don't included the planet forming around its current star.

It might have been ejected from a nearby star system and captured in its new home by chance?

Maybe a bit more likely than having to rewrite star system formation theory.

 

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On 12/2/2023 at 12:18 AM, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Discovery of planet too big for its sun throws off solar system formation models

 

I bet it has been impacted by several other planets over a very long time or has been ejected from another star system as L.A.T.1961 suggests.

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