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My prediction of an explosion of cryptid 'evidence' in the next couple years.


George Ford

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So we are seeing the birth of AI created images right now, and in just a year it has come leaps and bounds. I have been messing around with the free image creator that is part of Bing. With a fairly straight forward prompt I was able to get the image below made. At first glance it looks somewhat realistic, if I was to print it out and then take a lowish res photo of the print with bad lighting and also added some grain, dirt and aging damage, maybe a liquid stain on part of it, then it would look like a real photo of a photo. 

In a couple of years the AI will have developed enough to do it all on request and it literally only takes a minute now. We will see an increasing number of posts from pranksters and frauds that will claim to be of real cryptids. These images will be presented as 'proof'. 

What you guys think?

_a77a0e1b-c2fa-48be-a2ab-3c6018dc0a8c.jpg

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1 hour ago, George Ford said:

So we are seeing the birth of AI created images right now, and in just a year it has come leaps and bounds. I have been messing around with the free image creator that is part of Bing. With a fairly straight forward prompt I was able to get the image below made. At first glance it looks somewhat realistic, if I was to print it out and then take a lowish res photo of the print with bad lighting and also added some grain, dirt and aging damage, maybe a liquid stain on part of it, then it would look like a real photo of a photo. 

In a couple of years the AI will have developed enough to do it all on request and it literally only takes a minute now. We will see an increasing number of posts from pranksters and frauds that will claim to be of real cryptids. These images will be presented as 'proof'. 

What you guys think?

_a77a0e1b-c2fa-48be-a2ab-3c6018dc0a8c.jpg

I think you did a great job,:tu: although I am certainly not an expert. I also think you right about AI generated photos, I think at this point we have only scratched the surface. 

 

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4 hours ago, Grim Reaper 6 said:

I think you did a great job,:tu: although I am certainly not an expert. I also think you right about AI generated photos, I think at this point we have only scratched the surface. 

 

Thanks, it took 3 attempts and I had to keep tweaking the wording of the prompt to get it more realistic and old fashioned 'box camera' style looked the best, this one here made me me snort my coffee out my nose, for some reason the AI put boots on the bigfoot! HA! 

_4ddcfa10-eb27-4b8d-a8d2-e8e38651546b.jpg

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6 minutes ago, George Ford said:

Thanks, it took 3 attempts and I had to keep tweaking the wording of the prompt to get it more realistic and old fashioned 'box camera' style looked the best, this one here made me me snort my coffee out my nose, for some reason the AI put boots on the bigfoot! HA! 

_4ddcfa10-eb27-4b8d-a8d2-e8e38651546b.jpg

Well in my opinion you did a great job. Now the photo above is interesting, the only reason I can think of concerning the boots is that the maker wanted to insure people knew it was fake!:yes:

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Already happening on facebook. 

 

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20 hours ago, George Ford said:

So we are seeing the birth of AI created images right now, and in just a year it has come leaps and bounds. I have been messing around with the free image creator that is part of Bing. With a fairly straight forward prompt I was able to get the image below made. At first glance it looks somewhat realistic, if I was to print it out and then take a lowish res photo of the print with bad lighting and also added some grain, dirt and aging damage, maybe a liquid stain on part of it, then it would look like a real photo of a photo. 

In a couple of years the AI will have developed enough to do it all on request and it literally only takes a minute now. We will see an increasing number of posts from pranksters and frauds that will claim to be of real cryptids. These images will be presented as 'proof'. 

What you guys think?

One advantage of AI image generators for me is that I can use them to create stock images to illustrate news stories in situations where no standard image is available.

As the technology develops, however, I can well see it becoming difficult to tell a genuine image from an AI-generated one and that is going to be a big problem, not only for cryptozoological evidence but in general. Eventually, it will become impossible to tell if a video, image or audio clip is real or fake.

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15 hours ago, George Ford said:

Thanks, it took 3 attempts and I had to keep tweaking the wording of the prompt to get it more realistic and old fashioned 'box camera' style looked the best, this one here made me me snort my coffee out my nose, for some reason the AI put boots on the bigfoot! HA! 

_4ddcfa10-eb27-4b8d-a8d2-e8e38651546b.jpg

Hi George,

It's possible that AI is already incorporating safety fraud measures in their image generators. Everyone who has claimed to have seen Bigfoot never reported to have seen the poor persecuted beast wearing boots.

But I suspect that AI has been programmed with having a little humor, and therefore it was poking fun at you: They died with their boots on!  Or could be that AI is incorporating subliminal messages in the images it draws for free. Experimenting with the prospect of deriving money from  future advertising. In this case, I suspect AI is wanting you to go see a movie. Soon AI will span the internet at nearly the speed of light, and make a determination from data analysis if the old movie has generated more interest than before putting the boots on your Bigfoot, and also if the movie has been watched more than usual.

I'm in agreement with your predictions also. But I have an even more logical hunch about the emergence of worldwide identity fraud, fraudulent images, and all the lies being spoken, which are becoming very fashionable.   

From Wikipedia.

They Died with Their Boots On is a 1941 American Biographical western film from Warner Bros. Pictures, produced by Hal B. Wallis and Robert Fellows, directed by Raoul Walsh, that stars Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland.

The film's storyline offers a highly fictionalized account of the life of Gen. George Armstrong Custer, from the time he enters West Point military academy through the American Civil War and finally to his death at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Custer is portrayed as a fun-loving, dashing figure who chooses honor and glory over money and corruption. The battle against Chief Crazy Horse (played by Anthony Quinn) is portrayed as a crooked deal between politicians and a corporation that wants the land Custer promised to the Native Americans.

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Nice job on the photo, it illustrates your point well.

Ultimately, though the frauds and hoaxes will continue I don’t think it will change the overall situation much. The crowd that automatically believes everything it sees will keep doing so regardless, while the complete lack of physical evidence for any of these alleged creatures (corpses, fossils, hair, scat) still won’t convince anyone else.

 

Edited by Antigonos
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Good job, George.

And, yes, I agree with you, it will present nightmares to us. Forget any UFO pics, as well

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  • 1 month later...

Seems like a false flag to me - have you even seen the latest photo?  The man is fit to run!

bbb.png

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On 12/11/2023 at 8:40 AM, George Ford said:

So we are seeing the birth of AI created images right now, and in just a year it has come leaps and bounds. I have been messing around with the free image creator that is part of Bing. With a fairly straight forward prompt I was able to get the image below made. At first glance it looks somewhat realistic, if I was to print it out and then take a lowish res photo of the print with bad lighting and also added some grain, dirt and aging damage, maybe a liquid stain on part of it, then it would look like a real photo of a photo. 

In a couple of years the AI will have developed enough to do it all on request and it literally only takes a minute now. We will see an increasing number of posts from pranksters and frauds that will claim to be of real cryptids. These images will be presented as 'proof'. 

What you guys think?

_a77a0e1b-c2fa-48be-a2ab-3c6018dc0a8c.jpg

I think it looks like a pretty good fake.  It just reiterates how this mystery will never be solved without a real body or bones, and not a fake rubber suit in an ice chest like those inbred idiots attempted to pull off back in the day - and with live news coverage no less?!  Derp.  It’s a damn shame.

Edited by Guyver
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On 12/12/2023 at 1:41 PM, Saru said:

One advantage of AI image generators for me is that I can use them to create stock images to illustrate news stories in situations where no standard image is available.

As the technology develops, however, I can well see it becoming difficult to tell a genuine image from an AI-generated one and that is going to be a big problem, not only for cryptozoological evidence but in general. Eventually, it will become impossible to tell if a video, image or audio clip is real or fake.

Yep. This will be the death of video and photos as evidence. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

The image is just a small part of any investigation.  The backstory, timeline and a whole pile of other stuff needs to all fit together.  Also, the person who uses AI is going to be questioned about the camera, sensor, lens, settings, etc.  Plenty of stuff for s/he to screw up on.

 

So to me, I think it may even reduce the number of cases presented.  There has already been a decrease in claims made, imo, because of all the good cameras out there nowadays.. blurfos just don't cut it any more.  I think AI imagery will get busted fairly early.

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1 hour ago, ChrLzs said:

The image is just a small part of any investigation.  The backstory, timeline and a whole pile of other stuff needs to all fit together.  Also, the person who uses AI is going to be questioned about the camera, sensor, lens, settings, etc.  Plenty of stuff for s/he to screw up on.

 

So to me, I think it may even reduce the number of cases presented.  There has already been a decrease in claims made, imo, because of all the good cameras out there nowadays.. blurfos just don't cut it any more.  I think AI imagery will get busted fairly early.

 

Blurfos? I haven't heard that one before, lol, but I wonder what'll happen when image generators get even more realistic. I'm a sci-fi author and I've been using the Bing AI to make an art gallery for my books, and the biggest problem I see is that its quality drops drastically the more people you have in a picture. Also, it really struggles with fingers. Just look at that bendy noodle finger on the OP's left lumberjack. These are small problems though, and once we get a feature to save locations, characters, and other details? Well, I predict we'll at the very least get a few "Insiders" and "Whistleblowers" posting "real pictures" from the inside of Area 51 on forums like this and ATS. That, or they'll send it into a radio show or something. The question is, will it be any more popular/prevalent than all the other hoaxes that have been pulled so far?

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35 minutes ago, Procyon said:

The question is, will it be any more popular/prevalent than all the other hoaxes that have been pulled so far?

I doubt it. :) Thing is, to pull off a hoax even for a short while, takes a lot of work.  AI will need to be VERY smart even at a low level - If the person requesting the image or video is not particularly knowledgeable in the (very wide) field of image forensics, my guess is that AI won't sit there and teach them, or start asking a thousand questions - it will just do what it's told.

I don't want to give too much away..  Image forensics is a bit of a hobby.. and *many* things can trip you up.  Even if just one tiny aspect is wrong, the image is busted.  I'll just mention a couple as I'm keeping a lot up my sleeve for reasons that may become clear as AI get's better and better 😎 : 

- shadows and lighting - quite apart from just textural lighting and raytracing so all the objects are lit properly, there will of course be things like the sun angle at the location and the date/time...

- sensor and lens issues - once we know what camera and lens and settings are being used, there are many, many subtleties...most of them I'll keep to myself for now, but for example - 'bokeh' (ie the way in which out-of-focus things look) can be very distinctive, and so is depth of field (not only can we determine the extent of in-focus-ness, we can also measure blurriness, and whether it is motion blur, rather than out of focus..

Anyway, like I said, if they get something wrong, the game is over, and there are hundreds, if not thousands, of tiny details that you can screw up.

Edited by ChrLzs
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21 hours ago, ChrLzs said:

I doubt it. :) Thing is, to pull off a hoax even for a short while, takes a lot of work.  AI will need to be VERY smart even at a low level - If the person requesting the image or video is not particularly knowledgeable in the (very wide) field of image forensics, my guess is that AI won't sit there and teach them, or start asking a thousand questions - it will just do what it's told.

I don't want to give too much away..  Image forensics is a bit of a hobby.. and *many* things can trip you up.  Even if just one tiny aspect is wrong, the image is busted.  I'll just mention a couple as I'm keeping a lot up my sleeve for reasons that may become clear as AI get's better and better 😎 : 

- shadows and lighting - quite apart from just textural lighting and raytracing so all the objects are lit properly, there will of course be things like the sun angle at the location and the date/time...

- sensor and lens issues - once we know what camera and lens and settings are being used, there are many, many subtleties...most of them I'll keep to myself for now, but for example - 'bokeh' (ie the way in which out-of-focus things look) can be very distinctive, and so is depth of field (not only can we determine the extent of in-focus-ness, we can also measure blurriness, and whether it is motion blur, rather than out of focus..

Anyway, like I said, if they get something wrong, the game is over, and there are hundreds, if not thousands, of tiny details that you can screw up.

Well, I must admit I'm concerned, if not actually worried. I'm not sure whether anyone would try and fake historical thylacine images but if they do it could prove tricky. There are plenty out there with no backstory, some are known only from reproductions. OK, they're all real (so far) and we can identify enough to put them into context,  but I've seen some pretty weird ones turn up, which under slightly different circumstances, I don't know what we'd make of them. 

Edited by oldrover
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For me, I am calling it now.  It does not exist.  I will not put any stock in any photos brought forward in the future even though they will end up in the "evidence" file on bigfoot sites.

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  • 1 month later...
On 12/11/2023 at 11:40 AM, George Ford said:

So we are seeing the birth of AI created images right now, and in just a year it has come leaps and bounds. I have been messing around with the free image creator that is part of Bing. With a fairly straight forward prompt I was able to get the image below made. At first glance it looks somewhat realistic, if I was to print it out and then take a lowish res photo of the print with bad lighting and also added some grain, dirt and aging damage, maybe a liquid stain on part of it, then it would look like a real photo of a photo. 

In a couple of years the AI will have developed enough to do it all on request and it literally only takes a minute now. We will see an increasing number of posts from pranksters and frauds that will claim to be of real cryptids. These images will be presented as 'proof'. 

What you guys think?

_a77a0e1b-c2fa-48be-a2ab-3c6018dc0a8c.jpg

I love what you did here however it just doesn't have a period vibe to me. Don't take that too harshly I'm super jaded and very OCD in attention to details most would miss,

As you said age up this image and I would hang it on my wall, but AI contrary to what lazy scared artists bray about is just a tool and only as good as it's user,

Photo haven't been enough to prove anything ever except to your credious true believers that wnt change with AI

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19 hours ago, the13bats said:

I love what you did here however it just doesn't have a period vibe to me. Don't take that too harshly I'm super jaded and very OCD in attention to details most would miss,

As you said age up this image and I would hang it on my wall, but AI contrary to what lazy scared artists bray about is just a tool and only as good as it's user,

Photo haven't been enough to prove anything ever except to your credious true believers that wnt change with AI

It is never harsh to examine and judge evidence, we must always do it! Sometimes it is people that obsess about the minutia that can make the biggest difference.  

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3 hours ago, George Ford said:

It is never harsh to examine and judge evidence, we must always do it! Sometimes it is people that obsess about the minutia that can make the biggest difference.  

Your avatar mask reminds me of that Halloween prop that went viral when used as a picture for a lot of creepypasta years back,

The prop had a few versions and called spazm a buddy found one at a goodwill for like ten bucks I was jealous

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