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Is agression a genetic phenomenon?


Viatorem

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I'm wondering if agression has a genetic factor in humanity.

 

For instance Someone fought in a war, due to that war this person becomes agressive. His child has no agression issues and even flees the territory where the war had raged. 

Her child, the grandchild, has agression issues. These get triggered by an event that happens later in life. It is possible she had agression problems as a child, it diminished but got triggered again later in life.

 

I hope, it makes sense somehow. I ask this because I'm working on a story line in which one of the main characters actually has this and wondered if this is possible. If it is I can work it in the storyline the way I set it above in this post.  

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Survival of the fittest. Built in to everybody irrespective of exposure to violence. 

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epigenetics Is a real science. Scared, aggressive etc behaviour might very well be passed on in our dna. 

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16 hours ago, Unusual Tournament said:

epigenetics Is a real science. Scared, aggressive etc behaviour might very well be passed on in our dna. 

So, I can assume that my first statement is realisticly possible?

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18 hours ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

Survival of the fittest. Built in to everybody irrespective of exposure to violence. 

You have different variations of that, not just a tendency to cope with survival by means of violence.

You can perfectly survive by means of flight in a flight or fight situation what it in essence is. 

Or even fight without the use of violence what we saw a lot during the wars. People in basements hiding people from the third reich for instance. They fight with rebellious acts but in a non violent way. 

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22 hours ago, Viatorem said:

I'm wondering if aggression has a genetic factor in humanity.

For instance Someone fought in a war, due to that war this person becomes aggressive. His child has no aggression issues and even flees the territory where the war had raged. 

Her child, the grandchild, has aggression issues. These get triggered by an event that happens later in life. It is possible she had aggression problems as a child, it diminished but got triggered again later in life.

I hope, it makes sense somehow. I ask this because I'm working on a story line in which one of the main characters actually has this and wondered if this is possible. If it is I can work it in the storyline the way I set it above in this post.  

The flight or fight response does have a genetic bias towards either side.

If you look at the OCEAN personality model they are involved in a persons levels of agreeableness. The genes on their own just produce someone who is aggressive, it takes further to make them psycho or open them up to the risks of sociopathy following abuse.

Does the guy you refer to look like a brute or look very masculine? If so its more likely he has it. The military train controlled aggression into soldiers, but also trauma during service can be a cause.

Other than that perhaps he is just stressed. If it is genetic then look at his mothers father, not his own father.

Edited by Electric Scooter
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2 hours ago, Viatorem said:

So, I can assume that my first statement is realisticly possible?

My understanding: For epigenetics to work in your scenario (don’t think it’s proven theory at this point) in passing down violent or passive behavioural traits, trauma would have to superimpose itself chemically into our dna. Over a long period of time.

When that person had a child then that child could inherit that trait. 

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On 1/18/2024 at 6:10 AM, Viatorem said:

I'm wondering if agression has a genetic factor in humanity.

 

Of course it does, anyone who has ever bred animals have seen this. Why do you think there are lines of fighting animals such as dogs and chickens. Also I've seen babies adopted from violent families and reared in a peaceful homes become violent as they mature. It's all about genetics.

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The father or mother would have had to have that aggression in them before the events for it to be passed on. I suppose it has to start somewhere but not in a couple of gens.

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On 1/17/2024 at 7:10 PM, Viatorem said:

I'm wondering if agression has a genetic factor in humanity.

 

For instance Someone fought in a war, due to that war this person becomes agressive. His child has no agression issues and even flees the territory where the war had raged. 

Her child, the grandchild, has agression issues. These get triggered by an event that happens later in life. It is possible she had agression problems as a child, it diminished but got triggered again later in life.

 

I hope, it makes sense somehow. I ask this because I'm working on a story line in which one of the main characters actually has this and wondered if this is possible. If it is I can work it in the storyline the way I set it above in this post.  

On 1/17/2024 at 10:43 PM, L.A.T.1961 said:

Survival of the fittest. Built in to everybody irrespective of exposure to violence. 

There is a study (it is too late at night for me to look for the links) that showed that the grandchildren, not the children, of survivors of Nazi concentration camps had an abnormal reaction to food. The severe starvation of their grandparents had possibly caused a genetic reaction of some sort.

It is also accepted that more boys than girls are born when a country is at war. Weird.Why Does War Breed More Boys? | Popular Science (popsci.com)

Edited by pellinore
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/18/2024 at 6:20 PM, Electric Scooter said:

The flight or fight response does have a genetic bias towards either side.

If you look at the OCEAN personality model they are involved in a persons levels of agreeableness. The genes on their own just produce someone who is aggressive, it takes further to make them psycho or open them up to the risks of sociopathy following abuse.

Does the guy you refer to look like a brute or look very masculine? If so its more likely he has it. The military train controlled aggression into soldiers, but also trauma during service can be a cause.

Other than that perhaps he is just stressed. If it is genetic then look at his mothers father, not his own father.

It's a woman. She is the lead in the story.

Basicly the line goes like this. She is a student meets a man this man is a hit for hire who struggles with his occupation. He does one more job and then wants to leave the country building up a new life with her without being a hitman. Basicly he did the hitman jobs as a mean to an ends. He dies on the last job. She finds out what he actually did and decides to avenge him which in turn actually progresses in her becoming a hit for hire. Still figuring out if it ends wel or not :)

 

Her grandfather fought against the Apartheid regime which will be the base of the whole line. 

Edited by Viatorem
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  • 2 months later...
Posted (edited)

Homo sapien is a primate species competing in an environment of limited resources. We are 98.8 percent genetically similar to Pan troglodytes who are inherently violent. 

Edited by man with breasts
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The cashier analogy.  Oppressive vs suppressive.

 

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