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First Ariane 6 flight [updated - launched]


Waspie_Dwarf

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First Ariane 6 flight model ships to Europe’s Spaceport

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The stages that make up the central core of Europe’s new rocket, Ariane 6, have left mainland Europe and are heading towards Europe’s spaceport in French Guiana. Shipping across the Atlantic, the main stage and upper stage were loaded into the purpose-built hybrid sailing ship Canopée at the harbours of Bremen, Germany, and Le Havre, France.

Canopée left the port of Le Havre carrying the last elements that will form the first Ariane 6 rocket to soar into space. Canopée is scheduled to arrive at the port of Pariacabo in Kourou, French Guiana, by the end of February. From there, the two stages will be transported by truck the last few kilometres to Europe’s Spaceport.

Read More: ➡️ESA

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Not reusable seems to be a big oversite.

And ESA still ignore the UK designed Skylon.

 

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22 minutes ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

And ESA still ignore the UK designed Skylon.

ESA is not ignoring the Skylon, it has invested millions in it, but Reaction Engines, who are building Skylon, have only got as far as demonstrating that it can cool and liquefy oxygen from the atmosphere, it has not even produced a single working engine so far. It is simply not an option for replacing Ariane 5.

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2 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

ESA is not ignoring the Skylon, it has invested millions in it, but Reaction Engines, who are building Skylon, have only got as far as demonstrating that it can cool and liquefy oxygen from the atmosphere, it has not even produced a single working engine so far. It is simply not an option for replacing Ariane 5.

I can't help thinking that if ESA had abandoned ariane6 and spent the money and resources on Skylon it would be much further along the path to a real launch system. 

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40 minutes ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

I can't help thinking that if ESA had abandoned ariane6 and spent the money and resources on Skylon it would be much further along the path to a real launch system. 

If ESA had abandoned Ariane 6 in favour of Skylon the only thing that would have changed is that Europe would have no inddependent access to space for decades to come.

Skylon may never work. If ESA was to put all it's eggs in that basket it would have been foolish beyond belief. It is highly experimental technology, no one, not even Reaction Engines, knows if it will work and when it will first fly if it does.

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42 minutes ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

I can't help thinking that if ESA had abandoned ariane6 and spent the money and resources on Skylon it would be much further along the path to a real launch system. 

The Ariane 6 is developed by Ariane Space, which is owned by Airbus, not ESA. 

ESA does not develop rockets, they  use existing launchers. While they often do use Ariane rockets, they also uses rockets from other suppliers.

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59 minutes ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

The Ariane 6 is developed by Ariane Space, which is owned by Airbus, not ESA. 

ESA does not develop rockets, they  use existing launchers. While they often do use Ariane rockets, they also uses rockets from other suppliers.

It's slightly more complicated than that.

Arianespace was formed by the French space agency, CNES  and ESA as the commercial arm of the Ariane programme. ESA is heavily involved in the design and development of Ariane 6. Ariane Group will manufacture it, Arianespace will sell it.

Reaction Engines, which is developing the SABRE engine and the Skylon launch vehicle is a private company. BAe Systems, Boeing and Rolls Royce have all invested in it and ESA and the UK Space Agency have both provided funding.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ariane 6 ready for unloading

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In time for its summer launch this year, Ariane 6 has arrived at the port of Pariacabo in Kourou, French Guiana – home of Europe’s Spaceport – and is ready to be assembled.

All the elements that make up the rocket are manufactured in mainland Europe and then transported by this novel ship, Canopée (canopy in French). It is the first custom-built transporter to use sails, reducing emissions and saving on fuel by up to 30%, and on this trip, it has travelled for 10 days covering over 7000 km.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

 

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  • The title was changed to First Ariane 6 flight model ships to Europe’s Spaceport [updated]
  • 2 months later...

Ariane 6 standing tall

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On 24 April 2024 the central core for Europe’s new rocket Ariane 6 that will fly to space for the first time was moved upright on the launch pad.

Four automated vehicles transported the Ariane 6 central core, that consists of the main and upper stage, from the launcher assembly building to the launch pad that is about 800 meters away.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

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First Ariane 6 booster gets lift to launch zone

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The first of two boosters that will power the Ariane 6 ‘flight model-1’ into orbit this summer was transported on 25 April 2024 from the booster storage facility in Kourou, French Guiana, to the launch zone. Tomorrow, the second booster will be transported from the booster integration building to join it, and soon after operations will begin to connect both the boosters to the rocket’s central core. 

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

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  • The title was changed to First Ariane 6 flight [updated]

Second booster for first Ariane 6

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The second of two boosters that will power the Ariane 6 ‘flight model-1’ into orbit this summer was transported on 26 April 2024 from the booster finishing facility at Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, to the launch zone.

With the two boosters complementing the central core, all the propulsion stages for Europe’s new rocket Ariane 6 are on the launch pad.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

 

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Start of the first Ariane 6 launch campaign

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In brief

The central core and boosters of the first Ariane 6 are now on the launch pad at Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

 

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Ariane 6 gets its wings

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The first Ariane 6 rocket to take flight is being pieced together at Europe's spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. The two solid rocket fuel P120C boosters have now been connected to the central core.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Ariane 6 joint update report, 21 May 2024

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The Ariane 6 Launcher Task Force consists of top management of ESA, as the overall Ariane 6 procuring entity and launch system architect, of the French space agency CNES as the launch base prime contractor, of ArianeGroup as the launcher system prime contractor and of Arianespace as the launch service provider. This group reports regularly on progress being made towards inaugural flight of the new Ariane 6 launcher.

Teams are narrowing down the launch period and the first attempt for launch will happen within the first two weeks of July 2024.We are on track and in line with the launch period that was communicated in November.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Ariane 6 inaugural launch targeted for 9 July

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The first launch of Ariane 6 is targeted for 9 July 2024 from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana, ESA Director General Josef Aschbacher announced at the ILA Berlin Air Show today.

Josef Aschbacher was joined by the Ariane 6 Task Force partners, ArianeGroup CEO Martin Sion, CNES CEO Philippe Baptiste and Arianespace CEO Stéphane Israël on stage to announce this milestone.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

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  • 2 weeks later...

Upper part completes first Ariane 6

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CREDIT
ESA–L. Bourgeon

Hoisting the upper composite with the payloads to be launched on the first Ariane 6 at Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana, 14 June 2024.

Inside the rocket’s fairing – a nosecone that splits into two vertically after liftoff – is hardware from experiments, deployers, satellites and reentry capsules.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

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Ariane 6 pre-show: wet dress rehearsal complete

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Yesterday, the first Ariane 6 rocket to launch into space went through its last full ‘wet dress rehearsal’ at Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana – it provided an exciting sneak peek of what’s to come, stopping just a few seconds before engine ignition and of course, lift-off.

Similar to rehearsals carried out with a test rocket during combined test campaigns, this time the real flight model, its payloads, the launchpad and teams on the ground went through every step of launch operations; from pumping 180 tonnes of propellant – liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen – into the waiting Ariane 6, the rollback of the mobile gantry, running all of the ground control software and more.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

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NASA’s Space Weather CubeSat Rides on Ariane 6 Rocket

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CURIE (CubeSat Radio Interferometry Experiment) will launch as a rideshare payload on the inaugural flight of ESA’s (European Space Agency) Arianespace Ariane 6 rocket to provide observations of solar radio waves critical for greater understanding of space weather. Photo credit: ESA

NASA will provide the CURIE (CubeSat Radio Interferometry Experiment) as a rideshare payload on the ESA (European Space Agency) inaugural flight of the Arianespace Ariane 6 rocket to provide a glimpse into the primary drivers of space weather. Launch is targeted for July 9 from Europe’s Spaceport, the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, in French Guiana.

Designed by Dr. David Sundkvist and a team from the University of California, Berkeley, CURIE is a radio interferometer comprising two 3U CubeSats that will launch bolted together as one before separating into two later in orbit. The experiment’s two CubeSats will provide two separate vantage points to measure the same radio waves coming from the Sun and other sources in the sky.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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Ariane 6 launch: how to watch and what to look out for

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Ariane 6 is scheduled to launch on 9 July 2024, with a launch window from 15:00-19:00 local time at Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana (19:00–23:00 BST, 9 July 20:00–10 July 00:00 CEST).

This is a big moment for Europe, as the rocket will ensure our guaranteed, autonomous access to space – and all of the science, Earth observation, technology development and commercial possibilities that it entails. With many features brand new to Ariane 6, we’ll be able to carry more and take it further, while sustainably disposing of the launcher's upper stage to prevent it becoming space debris.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

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Tracking Ariane 6 as it soars over the Azores

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A network of ground stations around the world, including two owned by ESA, will track the debut flight of Europe’s new Ariane 6 rocket. They will monitor key phases of the flight and gather telemetry and video that will be used to analyse the rocket’s performance and optimise future launches.

As Ariane 6 thunders and roars as it rises into the sky from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, activity on the ground continues. The launcher control team in Kourou monitor an influx of data from ground stations scattered along the rocket’s flight path that receive telemetry as it passes overhead at up to 28 000 km per hour.

Read More: ➡️ ESA

 

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  • The title was changed to First Ariane 6 flight [updated - launched]

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