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Alzheimer’s/Dementia and Vaccinations


simplybill

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36 minutes ago, simplybill said:

No, it isn’t what you think. (It’s not an anti-vaccine diatribe).
There’s really not too much to discuss, as both articles are self-explanatory, but those of you who want to be proactive in reducing your chances of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s/Dementia later in life may find this interesting.

My uncle was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in the ‘80s, and I’ve since been following the research and the new insights into this terrible disease. I found this recent article to be especially interesting:

“Recent research suggests that regular vaccinations against influenza and other infectious diseases such as shingles, pneumococcal pneumonia, and tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough) may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.”

https://jewishworldreview.com/1223/flu_shot.php3

And another interesting article:

“The Nun Study” was a giant leap forward for Alzheimer’s research. If you haven’t read the book, I highly recommend it. From Wikipedia:

“Among the documents reviewed were autobiographical essays that were written by the nuns upon joining the sisterhood. Upon review, it was found that an essay's lack of linguistic density (e.g., complexity, vivacity, fluency) functioned as a significant predictor of its author's risk for developing Alzheimer's disease in old age. However, the study also found that the Sisters who wrote positively in their personal journals were more likely to live longer than their counterparts. Snowdon and associates found three indicators of longer life when coding the sister's autobiographies: the number of positive sentences, positive words, and the variety of positive emotions used.”

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nun_Study

 

 

 

That book looks interesting.   Thanks for posting it.

I am taking care of my 90 year old aunt (soon to be 91) and she is in the late stages of dementia.  Now that I know what to look for I realize she exhibited symptoms more than 5 years before anyone noticed she was getting "dotty" or "had lost the plot"   She has been with  me for 2 years and everything had changed exponentially as far as what she can understand and how often she can't even complete a simple task.  Her memories currently revolve around the 60's.   My other aunt the same age went down faster and was running away from her own home to go home, she thought she was about 10 years old and wanted her mamma.  I sympathize with my cousin who took care of her for 10 years before she died.  It takes a lot of stamina and giving up your own life to do that.

So, that wasn't my point, just some background.  Yesterday my daughter and I attended a meeting at the Pace Medicare senior center where my aunt goes 3 times a week and the doctor mentioned there is now a drug to help alleviate the symptoms of dementia from progressing, however it only works for people who are just starting to experience it.  She brought it up because the nurse who I talked to laast week had suggested it, along with some other useless suggestions.   Sorry, I am a little miffed at the nurse, she is like a steamroller and so am I so we collided head on.  🤣

I found it inetersting that the new drug is an anti-depressant.   Something they give alzheimer and dementia patients, even though the side effects are worse than the depression these people usually have.   And my aunt is not depressed, she still enjoys life, probably because she doesn't remember what happened to her after the 60's.

Edited by Desertrat56
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I have so many friends that don't get regular vaccinations even though they are getting up there when the flu become more serious.  I am definitely going to share this article around.

 

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“The Nun Study”

Its hard to imagine that someone's outlook on life or positivity can affect Alzheimer's and longevity. 

So presumably its a healthy brain that creates the positive vibes and longer life?

 

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34 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

That book looks interesting.

I got the book title wrong. The book is written by the man that started the Nun Study in 1986.

Thanks for the story about your two aunts. Much respect to you for being a caregiver. 
 

image.thumb.jpeg.447a4f1f9908e0d4ce88770ccdf7e0ce.jpeg

 

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9 minutes ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

“The Nun Study”

Its hard to imagine that someone's outlook on life or positivity can affect Alzheimer's and longevity. 

So presumably its a healthy brain that creates the positive vibes and longer life?

 

I don't think it is so hard to imagine.  I think someone's outlook has a lot to do with it, but is not the only factor.  There are many factors, diet (i.e. too much sugar and alcohol and not enough fiber), genetic predisposition, polllution, radiation, etc.   Attitude has just as much to do with it as all the other factors.   The two aunts who lived to be 90 with dementia (one still alive) had very bad attitudes, drank a lot when they were young, angry at family, one expressed her anger, the one who lives with me still is passive aggresive instead of actually saying why she is angry, neither let it go as long as they remembered.  

My dad also, who lived to be 88 suffered from dementia, diagnosed as alcohol induced.   The rest of the siblings in my dad's family who are still alive have happy lives, were pleasant and did not hold grudges.  One of them just turned 93 and is still clear minded.   Maybe there was a genetics factor as my grandmother was angry about everything too, but  my grandfather let it roll off his back and kept going, joking and laughing a lot but working very hard.

Edited by Desertrat56
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45 minutes ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

“The Nun Study”

Its hard to imagine that someone's outlook on life or positivity can affect Alzheimer's and longevity. 

So presumably its a healthy brain that creates the positive vibes and longer life?

 

I think maintaining a healthy attitude is more difficult for some people than others, and that may be related to the environment one grows up in. And yet, I’ve known people who grew up in dreadful circumstances who have a positive attitude about life, and others who grew up lacking for nothing and have a chronically negative attitude toward people and life in general. It’s an ‘unexplained mystery’ for sure.

The book goes into some detail about the brain autopsies. The most fascinating thing to me was the discovery that some of the non-Alzheimer’s nuns had the same amount of plaque- and Tau-induced cell damage as the nuns who had full-blown Alzheimer’s, but the non-Alzheimer’s nuns had spent their lifetimes learning new skills and languages, which forced their brains to produce new dendritic pathways. A neural map of their brains probably would have looked similar to a superhighway compared to a country road.

Edited by simplybill
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@L.A.T.1961 

I had to edit the 2nd paragraph of my last post. I found a couple of mistakes.

simplybill

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  • 2 months later...
On 2/13/2024 at 5:36 PM, simplybill said:

No, it isn’t what you think. (It’s not an anti-vaccine diatribe).
There’s really not too much to discuss, as both articles are self-explanatory, but those of you who want to be proactive in reducing your chances of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s/Dementia later in life may find this interesting.

My uncle was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in the ‘80s, and I’ve since been following the research and the new insights into this terrible disease. I found this recent article to be especially interesting:

“Recent research suggests that regular vaccinations against influenza and other infectious diseases such as shingles, pneumococcal pneumonia, and tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough) may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.”

https://jewishworldreview.com/1223/flu_shot.php3

And another interesting article:

“The Nun Study” was a giant leap forward for Alzheimer’s research. If you haven’t read the book, I highly recommend it. From Wikipedia:

“Among the documents reviewed were autobiographical essays that were written by the nuns upon joining the sisterhood. Upon review, it was found that an essay's lack of linguistic density (e.g., complexity, vivacity, fluency) functioned as a significant predictor of its author's risk for developing Alzheimer's disease in old age. However, the study also found that the Sisters who wrote positively in their personal journals were more likely to live longer than their counterparts. Snowdon and associates found three indicators of longer life when coding the sister's autobiographies: the number of positive sentences, positive words, and the variety of positive emotions used.”

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nun_Study

I found those articles, not that accidentally. First of all, I'm interested in the disease, how it works and if it's possible to prevent its development. And secondly, I need to write a university paper on it, so I need to find a lot of information, articles, and so on. These two are very useful and informative. I also came across this page https://papersowl.com/examples/alzheimers-disease/, which provides different helpful Alzheimers Disease essay samples, which I can say have already helped me a lot with writing. Now I have managed to decide which aspect to focus on the most, and I have found some interesting ideas, too.

 

 

Thank you so much for providing those articles. They're definitely worth reading. I know what those diseases are, and I've seen how they change people, and it's scary for me.
I care about myself and my family, so from time to time, I read some info about how we can minimize the risk of developing it, or what we have to do and so on, and such reading will for sure provide some useful info for me.

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Posted (edited)

Hi  @Isabella21

I took screenshots of your post. If I run across some good Alzheimer’s/Dementia studies or articles, I’ll private message them to you. 

simplybill

 

Edited by simplybill
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6 hours ago, Isabella21 said:

I care about myself and my family, so from time to time, I read some info about how we can minimize the risk of developing it, or what we have to do and so on, and such reading will for sure provide some useful info for me.

 There have been several studies about using supplemental Medium Chain Triglyceride oil and a ketogenic diet to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s. At this point, it’s definitely not a cure, but the researchers haven’t given up yet. I think Dr. Mary Newport got the ball rolling on that research with her book ‘Alzheimer’s: What if There Was a Cure?’ that was published in 2011. A third edition of the book was published last year.

One hopeful study: 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35310527/

From the study:

“Introduction: Cerebral glucose and insulin metabolism is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ketones provide alternative energy. Will medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil, a nutritional source of ketones, impact cognition in AD?

Results: Twenty subjects, average age 72.6 years, 45% women, 70% university educated had baseline MMSE 22.6/30 (10-29); MoCA 15.6/30 (4-27); baseline Cognigram® Part 1: 65-106, Part 2: 48-107. Average MCT oil consumption was 1.8 tablespoons/day (25.2 g, 234 kcal). Eighty percent remained stable or improved. Longer MCT exposure and age > 73, resulted in higher final MMSE (P < .001) and Cognigram® 1 scores.

Discussion: This is the longest duration MCT AD study to date. Eighty percent had stabilization or improvement in cognition, and better response with 9-month continual MCT oil.”

 

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Thanks for the information @simplybill 👍

I missed this thread when first posted...

Alzheimer's started taking my great grandfathers mind when I was around 5...over the next 2 1/2 - 3 years,his descent into madness is something I'll never forget...

Wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy...

That was the early 90's, at least we are starting to get a better understanding of it all.

Ever hear the song "Mad as a Hatter" by Larkin Poe?...good song on the subject matter.

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, CrimsonKing said:

Ever hear the song "Mad as a Hatter" by Larkin Poe?


I just now listened to it - it’s a very moving song! Thanks for suggesting it.

I can sympathize with the pain of losing your great-grandfather at such a young age. I was 3-years-old when my Mom died of cancer. There’s a one-year stretch in my memory that’s completely blank, so in that way I guess I’m fortunate. I don’t have to relive the childhood  trauma of wondering why I was suddenly abandoned (as told to me by my older sisters years later). I’m grateful to have photos of me with my Mom to remind me that she really did love me.

 

 

Edited by simplybill
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  • 1 month later...

An interesting article about Dementia and olive oil:

“The study found that consuming at least a half tablespoon of olive oil every day was associated with a 28 percent lower risk of dying from dementia, as compared with those who never or rarely consumed olive oil.”

“Participants who reported more olive oil consumption had a lower risk of dying from dementia, regardless of the quality of their diet or their adherence to the Mediterranean diet, which consists of plenty of fresh fruit, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and moderate amounts of fish and poultry.”

https://jewishworldreview.com/0524/dementia_olive_oil.php

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On 2/13/2024 at 5:47 PM, L.A.T.1961 said:

So presumably its a healthy brain that creates the positive vibes and longer life?

They probably did not have chronic diseases and for that reason led positive lifes.

 

I recall that several decades ago two Scottish scientists asserted that Alzheimers' occurs in people who both have an infection by a herpes virus and an allel that occurs in one in three people.

 

I myself suspect that there may be a link with medications like blood thinners and bloodvessel dilators. I have no proof.

 

I do have an anecdote, though: when I attended the funeral of a man who had died from Alzheimers' I happened to walk up a bit with his nurse. I asked her if he had been using such medication. She would not tell: for reasons of privacy. How about the many other patients in your Alzheimers' ward? I asked. They all use those medications, she answered.

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Wow. We all have our stories.  I went with my wife to feed her mother dinner every night after work.  She was in advanced stages and could not feed herself. Unlike a child, there was no awareness or life in her eyes.  I couldn't have been as detached if it were my mom, but I felt as if there was nobody there. I did that for my wife, she needed the support, she was miserable. It was a special torture for her to see here mom in that state.  I thought she was very brave to go through that every day for several months.  Her siblings did not show up except rarely.. Her mom didn't know we were there. It is so sad and doesn't get easier.  .Heartfelt sympathy for anyone experiencing that. 

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