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Dragons: An (Un)natural History


Still Waters

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1 hour ago, Abramelin said:

Water Cougar or Underwater Panther. "Amaan' gemek" It's a old Southeastern Siouian idea adopted by the Algonquians who replaced them. Not a bird. And it wasn't "scaled" in a sense but like the Horned Serpent, it's skin was made from mica. 

The name Piasa (k-iil'hs-waa/ Pay' ii-saa) itself means "moon" in Miami which is what the Illini spoke. 

"Ts'cho" is "bird". 

The "legend" in this link was invented by a White writer named John Russell in 1836.  

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4 hours ago, Abramelin said:

You mean Jörmungandr, the World Serpent.

One example yes.  The Saga of Ragnar Lothbrok for another.  I thought in the days when I was reading about Loch Ness, I came across references to large  worm like  creatures trapped while pursuing salmon into fishing weirs.  I think the acid spitting was also a component of the story.    Sadly that is only fluff. I can't find the source again and my memory is far from  eidetic.  In the Saga of the Volsungs  Fafnir is described as a large venom spitting snake, slithering down a trail every day to drink.  In his pep talk to Sigurd, Regn, Fafnir's brother,  describes him to Sigurd as falling into the range of large snakes.  ("You can do it boy, go get him.").  I think this tale started in Germany before the Scandinavians took it up.

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3 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

I don't recall ANY dragons having human faces except in the Bible, and that one is an allegorical reference to Rome in Revelations.

This is the oldest record of the Piasa petroglyph/painting, according to a Wiki page about it:

In 1673, Father Jacques Marquette saw the painting on a limestone bluff overlooking the Mississippi River while exploring the area. He recorded the following description:

"While skirting some rocks, which by their height and length inspired awe, we saw upon one of them two painted monsters which at first made us afraid, and upon which the boldest savages dare not long rest their eyes. they are as large as a calf; they have horns on their heads like those of a deer, a horrible look, red eyes, a beard like a tiger's, a face somewhat like a man's, a body covered with scales, and so long a tail that it winds all around the body, passing above the head and going back between the legs, ending in a fish's tail. green, red, and black are the three colors composing the picture. Moreover, these two monsters are so well painted that we cannot believe that any savage is their author; for good painters in France would find it difficult to reach that place conveniently to paint them. Here is approximately the shape of these monsters, as we have faithfully copied it."[7]

"Somewhat" is the magical word for today.

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12 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

This is the oldest record of the Piasa petroglyph/painting, according to a Wiki page about it:

In 1673, Father Jacques Marquette saw the painting on a limestone bluff overlooking the Mississippi River while exploring the area. He recorded the following description:

"While skirting some rocks, which by their height and length inspired awe, we saw upon one of them two painted monsters which at first made us afraid, and upon which the boldest savages dare not long rest their eyes. they are as large as a calf; they have horns on their heads like those of a deer, a horrible look, red eyes, a beard like a tiger's, a face somewhat like a man's, a body covered with scales, and so long a tail that it winds all around the body, passing above the head and going back between the legs, ending in a fish's tail. green, red, and black are the three colors composing the picture. Moreover, these two monsters are so well painted that we cannot believe that any savage is their author; for good painters in France would find it difficult to reach that place conveniently to paint them. Here is approximately the shape of these monsters, as we have faithfully copied it."[7]

"Somewhat" is the magical word for today.

You quoted Al instead of me.

There's a picture in the Wikipedia article "Underwater Panther" but it uses the Nishnab term, Miisupiishu. That's the Horned Serpent to the Lenape and something different.

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1 minute ago, Piney said:

You quoted Al instead of me.

There's a picture in the Wikipedia article "Underwater Panther" but it uses the Nishnab term, Miisupiishu. That's the Horned Serpent to the Lenape and something different.

I quoted Al because I replied to hìs post.

And the guy I quoted in my post to Al is an older source than your Russell.

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6 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

I quoted Al because I replied to hìs post.

And the guy I quoted in my post to Al is an older source than your Russell.

I was talking about the "legend". Not the picture. 

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@Piney, you never cease to amaze me. peace, bru  :)

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