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Defra officials buried analysis showing dire financial prospects for hill farmers


pellinore

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Economist Patrick Minford had advised the govt that leaving the Single Market would see the end of UK farming- it would no longer be sustainable. He saw this as desirable, as we could import cheaper food from around the world, cheaper than adhering to EU standards. Agriculture and the car industry would go the way of the steel and coal industries - they were no longer needed as the UK would be become a services-centred economy.  Personally, I'm not sure that was a good idea.

Government officials have buried an analysis of the financial prospects for some of the most vulnerable farmers in the UK after realising it was almost entirely bad news, the Guardian can reveal.

The analysis was to have been part of an optimistic look at the financial situation for upland farmers, some of the poorest in the country, but minutes from meetings about the plans obtained through a freedom of information request have revealed concerns were raised about the negative findings.

Farming groups said it was “irresponsible” not to make the analysis public after FOI documents showed officials refused to publish it as ministers would not like it.

Defra officials buried analysis showing dire financial prospects for hill farmers | Farming | The Guardian

 

Edited by pellinore
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It's a global issue and really the supermarket chains that are a big part of the issue, because of the 'buying cheap' pressure. I make a point out of buying only regional eggs and milk, but with real farm produce like all the corns... the international market is just really difficult.

Part of the reason I guess why Russia is banking hard on agriculture. They see their potential and the 'promise of power' when you control grain, mostly over the African countries which in turn makes a lot of minerals...

Like Egypt, right? Egypt is the most important African country, looking at it from the point of view of global power dynamics and because of their subsidized bread I believe one of the biggest buyers of Russian/Ukrainian wheat.

The only option farmers have at this point is to found cooperatives and go full 'regional' in their marketing, because the world market... that will never again be a liveable income. But then people will probably also demand green and free from pesticide so it stil requires a whole overhaul. But I wouldn't look to politics for any solution because there can't be any. Long term.

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On 2/20/2024 at 12:41 AM, pellinore said:

Economist Patrick Minford had advised the govt that leaving the Single Market would see the end of UK farming- it would no longer be sustainable. He saw this as desirable, as we could import cheaper food from around the world, cheaper than adhering to EU standards. Agriculture and the car industry would go the way of the steel and coal industries - they were no longer needed as the UK would be become a services-centred economy.  Personally, I'm not sure that was a good idea.

Government officials have buried an analysis of the financial prospects for some of the most vulnerable farmers in the UK after realising it was almost entirely bad news, the Guardian can reveal.

The analysis was to have been part of an optimistic look at the financial situation for upland farmers, some of the poorest in the country, but minutes from meetings about the plans obtained through a freedom of information request have revealed concerns were raised about the negative findings.

Farming groups said it was “irresponsible” not to make the analysis public after FOI documents showed officials refused to publish it as ministers would not like it.

Defra officials buried analysis showing dire financial prospects for hill farmers | Farming | The Guardian

 

Since leaving the EU 'Total Income From Farming' ('TIFF') rose 58% from 2020 to 2022.

"Even after being adjusted for inflation, which was unusually high last year at 5.0%, the farming sector still outperformed 2021 figures in terms of income by 7.5%, which is the highest 'TIFF' recorded in England since 1996."

I wonder why we saw a decline in farming revenues from 1996. Could it be joining the Single Market in 1993? 🤔

https://www.farmersguide.co.uk/business/total-farming-income-sees-13-rise-in-england-last-year/

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