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The US Navy is working on a radical new supersonic submarine


Still Waters

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Last month, Lockheed Martin and NASA jointly revealed the X-59 experimental aircraft, which is expected to fly at 1.4 times the speed of sound (925mph) without generating an explosive sonic boom. The sleek jet is expected to play an instrumental role in bringing back supersonic commercial air travel. But what if I tell you that researchers are working on a submarine that could travel more than three times faster than the X-59 jet? Yes, you read that right, and it is possible to travel at those speeds underwater, at least theoretically. Back in 2016, a team of researchers at Penn State Applied Research Laboratory funded by the US Navy started the development work on a revolutionary submarine that can attain supersonic speeds.

https://luxurylaunches.com/transport/02-07-2024-supersonic-underwater-submarine.php

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I wouldn't get near a super sonic submarine.  Possibly right before I let myself be teleported star trek style.

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Jets have met with tragedy for decades by colliding with a bird.  Can you imagine what one of these subs could hit?  :huh:

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4 minutes ago, and-then said:

Jets have met with tragedy for decades by colliding with a bird.  Can you imagine what one of these subs could hit?  :huh:

Maybe they could get some super strong nano-material and weave it into a tube shape that would fit the sub and string those pathways below the surface.  I still wouldn't want to go on one.

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32 minutes ago, and-then said:

Jets have met with tragedy for decades by colliding with a bird.  Can you imagine what one of these subs could hit?  :huh:

It is a curious fact that there have always been more aeroplanes under water than submarines in the sky.  A supersonic sub colliding with something might change this.

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58 minutes ago, and-then said:

Jets have met with tragedy for decades by colliding with a bird.  Can you imagine what one of these subs could hit?  :huh:

ya something going faster to hit some thing under the water ?

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 I can’t believe or think it could work.   But, they say the Soviet Torpedoes went 230 mph using the “cavitation” bubble trick!   I wouldn’t think that possible either..but they did it!?

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Seems like a moron stupid project designed to waste money, to justify the need to spend more money.

It's well known that if the military/FedGov doesn't use all the budgeted money, they get less the next year. But if they have stupid projects going on, they get more.

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Sound travel five time faster in water, so will it go at the speed of sound or not?

Sound moves at a faster speed in water (1500 meters/sec) than in air (about 340 meters/sec) because the mechanical properties of water differ from air.
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Interesting, and dovetails into the USO discussion nicely.

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It is hard to believe a sub could attain those speeds due to the density of water.

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16 hours ago, lightly said:

 I can’t believe or think it could work.   But, they say the Soviet Torpedoes went 230 mph using the “cavitation” bubble trick!   I wouldn’t think that possible either..but they did it!?

I've read of the Shkval

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VA-111_Shkval

220px-Shkval.jpg220px-Shkval_head.jpg

It was never put into production, but in theory and through some level of testing, it was proven to be viable.  I seem to recall they had a problem with the ability to accurately acquire targets with it.  Fascinating concept though.  It created a cushion of air bubbles that reduced drag significantly.

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2 hours ago, Jon the frog said:

Sound travel five time faster in water, so will it go at the speed of sound or not?

Sound moves at a faster speed in water (1500 meters/sec) than in air (about 340 meters/sec) because the mechanical properties of water differ from air.

Good point

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7 minutes ago, Guyver said:

It is hard to believe a sub could attain those speeds due to the density of water.

Stealth is the most crucial part of protecting a sub from destruction.  This thing would make so much noise it would be heard from hundreds of miles away, I'd imagine.  The concept is to create a bubble of air large enough for the sub or torpedo to travel inside of.

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7 hours ago, DieChecker said:

Seems like a moron stupid project designed to waste money, to justify the need to spend more money.

It's well known that if the military/FedGov doesn't use all the budgeted money, they get less the next year. But if they have stupid projects going on, they get more.

That has been the life's blood of DARPA for a generation.  Occasionally, they get one spectacularly right :) 

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3 hours ago, Jon the frog said:

Sound travel five time faster in water, so will it go at the speed of sound or not?

Sound moves at a faster speed in water (1500 meters/sec) than in air (about 340 meters/sec) because the mechanical properties of water differ from air.

Yup, and faster yet through a solid  like ROCK !    ..and not at all through a vacuum.  So, ‘the speed of sound’ is measured in air.     Light only travels at ‘the speed of light’ through a vacuum…slower and slower through gases like air , liquids like water,  solids like glass,     a rock?   Clear rocks like diamond…yes,  a chunk of basalt or black obsidian  ,no.?

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5 hours ago, and-then said:

I've read of the Shkval

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VA-111_Shkval

220px-Shkval.jpg220px-Shkval_head.jpg

It was never put into production, but in theory and through some level of testing, it was proven to be viable.  I seem to recall they had a problem with the ability to accurately acquire targets with it.  Fascinating concept though.  It created a cushion of air bubbles that reduced drag significantly.

It have been in production and still his. It's more intended for nuclear warhead delivery in the middle of a fleet or to force an ennemy to do hard evasive manouver cutting the link with his own torpedo.

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13 hours ago, and-then said:

  The concept is to create a bubble of air large enough for the sub or torpedo to travel inside of.

Sounds like the Warp Bubble effect the Enterprise encounters on Star Trek.

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The article does get down through the hype and fluff near the end.  There are some technical problems to solve first; power from underwater rockets yet to be developed, steering because rudders wont work in the bubble and so on.  It sounds like its decades away from materialization if ever. Its a filler story when there is no real news.

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55 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

The article does get down through the hype and fluff near the end.  There are some technical problems to solve first; power from underwater rockets yet to be developed, steering because rudders wont work in the bubble and so on.  It sounds like its decades away from materialization if ever. Its a filler story when there is no real news.

Indeed, wasn't DARPA getting headlines for a similar principle like a decade or more ago? 

I think I remember reading about it here. Too lazy to look though. 

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