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The Y Chromosome Is Vanishing


pallidin

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(Article compacted)

The sex of human and other mammal babies is decided by a male-determining gene on the Y chromosome. But the human Y chromosome is degenerating and may disappear in a few million years, leading to our extinction unless we evolve a new sex gene.

The imminent – evolutionarily speaking – disappearance of the human Y chromosome has elicited speculation about our future.

Some lizards and snakes are female-only species and can make eggs out of their own genes via what's known as parthenogenesis. But this can't happen in humans or other mammals because we have at least 30 crucial "imprinted" genes that work only if they come from the father via sperm

The new finding supports an alternative possibility – that humans can evolve a new sex determining gene.

https://www.sciencealert.com/the-y-chromosome-is-vanishing-a-new-sex-gene-may-be-the-future-of-men

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26 minutes ago, pallidin said:

(Article compacted)

The sex of human and other mammal babies is decided by a male-determining gene on the Y chromosome. But the human Y chromosome is degenerating and may disappear in a few million years, leading to our extinction unless we evolve a new sex gene.

The imminent – evolutionarily speaking – disappearance of the human Y chromosome has elicited speculation about our future.

Some lizards and snakes are female-only species and can make eggs out of their own genes via what's known as parthenogenesis. But this can't happen in humans or other mammals because we have at least 30 crucial "imprinted" genes that work only if they come from the father via sperm

The new finding supports an alternative possibility – that humans can evolve a new sex determining gene.

https://www.sciencealert.com/the-y-chromosome-is-vanishing-a-new-sex-gene-may-be-the-future-of-men

From the above link: 

Quote

In turn, this must mean the Y chromosome has lost 900–55 active genes over the 166 million years that humans and platypus have been evolving separately. That's a loss of about five genes per million years. At this rate, the last 55 genes will be gone in 11 million years.

11 million years is quite more than "a few" million and the genes responsible will likely be translocated and a new position or positions will play the part of the current Y Chromosome. That is, unless we go extinct before then. 

cormac

Edited by cormac mac airt
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1 hour ago, cormac mac airt said:

From the above link: 

11 million years is quite more than "a few" million and the genes responsible will likely be translocated and a new position or positions will play the part of the current Y Chromosome. That is, unless we go extinct before then. 

cormac

Even if we don't go extinct we certainly won't be HSS anymore. 

We'll probably be 2 separate organisms. The rabbit thingies and the centipede thingies at the end of The Time Machine. 😛

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1 hour ago, Piney said:

Even if we don't go extinct we certainly won't be HSS anymore. 

We'll probably be 2 separate organisms. The rabbit thingies and the centipede thingies at the end of The Time Machine. 😛

It took me longer than it should to realise you meant Homo Sapiens Sapien and not the shorthand name for my school….

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4 hours ago, cormac mac airt said:

From the above link: 

11 million years is quite more than "a few" million and the genes responsible will likely be translocated and a new position or positions will play the part of the current Y Chromosome. That is, unless we go extinct before then. 

cormac

That was referencing a rather simplistic mathematical extraction model. Looking just to the very next paragraph is revealing:

Our claim of the imminent demise of the human Y created a furore, and to this day there are claims and counterclaims about the expected lifetime of our Y chromosome – estimates between infinity and a few thousand years.

The "created a furore" link above directs to a .pdf which explains this further. It's accompanying comparative analysis and graphs highlight the recognition of professional discrepancies on this subject, so the article maintains it's integrity.

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14 minutes ago, pallidin said:

That was referencing a rather simplistic mathematical extraction model. Looking just to the very next paragraph is revealing:

Our claim of the imminent demise of the human Y created a furore, and to this day there are claims and counterclaims about the expected lifetime of our Y chromosome – estimates between infinity and a few thousand years.

The "created a furore" link above directs to a .pdf which explains this further. It's accompanying comparative analysis and graphs highlight the recognition of professional discrepancies on this subject, so the article maintains it's integrity.

The problem isn’t with the integrity of the article as much as, in this day and age of sound-bites, many and possibly most readers never get past a catchy news blurb and into the actual meat of a discussion itself. 
 

Also, this statement from the conversation.com link is factually incorrect: 

Quote

In any case, 4.5 million years is a long time. We have been human for less than 100,000 years. And I can think of several ways in which we are likely to become extinct long before we run out of Y chromosome.

Anthropologically speaking “we” as members of the genus Homo have been human for the last circa 2.8 million years. The average reader doesn’t always understand the generalizations made in print. 
 

cormac

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7 minutes ago, cormac mac airt said:

The problem isn’t with the integrity of the article as much as, in this day and age of sound-bites, many and possibly most readers never get past a catchy news blurb and into the actual meat of a discussion itself...

cormac

Fair enough. Thanks for your input!

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28 minutes ago, cormac mac airt said:

The average reader doesn’t always understand the generalizations made in print. 
 

And of course, if we live in a statistically normal population distribution, half of readers are below average. Kinda sad.

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  • 1 month later...
On 2/24/2024 at 6:41 PM, pallidin said:

(Article compacted)

The sex of human and other mammal babies is decided by a male-determining gene on the Y chromosome. But the human Y chromosome is degenerating and may disappear in a few million years, leading to our extinction unless we evolve a new sex gene.

The imminent – evolutionarily speaking – disappearance of the human Y chromosome has elicited speculation about our future.

Some lizards and snakes are female-only species and can make eggs out of their own genes via what's known as parthenogenesis. But this can't happen in humans or other mammals because we have at least 30 crucial "imprinted" genes that work only if they come from the father via sperm

The new finding supports an alternative possibility – that humans can evolve a new sex determining gene.

https://www.sciencealert.com/the-y-chromosome-is-vanishing-a-new-sex-gene-may-be-the-future-of-men

Was thinking to make a thread about this topic but I have just seen there is one already. 

Very interesting discussion indeed. Will the human race survive or we will extinct because of the vanishing of the Y-Chromosome. 

I authored another thread earlier today but wasn't careful enough to see there is another thread on the topic I chose: Crocodile Parthenogenesis! 

For the first time ever! 

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  • 5 weeks later...
On 2/24/2024 at 4:58 PM, cormac mac airt said:

The problem isn’t with the integrity of the article as much as, in this day and age of sound-bites, many and possibly most readers never get past a catchy news blurb and into the actual meat of a discussion itself. 
 

Also, this statement from the conversation.com link is factually incorrect: 

Anthropologically speaking “we” as members of the genus Homo have been human for the last circa 2.8 million years. The average reader doesn’t always understand the generalizations made in print. 
 

cormac

Here's more to add, just for the heck of it. The following is an automatic AI-generated response to my Google query "When did humans first appear" 

"Homo sapiens evolved around 300,000 years ago. However, archaeology suggests that complex technology and cultures, or "behavioral modernity", evolved more recently, around 50,000-65,000 years ago. 

 
The first modern humans began moving outside of Africa starting about 70,000-100,000 years ago. The "out of Africa" migration theory states that modern humans originated in Africa within the past 200,000 years and evolved from the now extinct Homo erectus. 
 
Humans are the only known species to have successfully populated, adapted to, and significantly altered a wide variety of land regions across the world, resulting in profound historical and environmental impacts."
-------
 
Again, the above is an AI response, not professional,and as such is currently subject to inaccuracies and misrepresentations, so keep that in mind, but I found it interesting.
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On 4/25/2024 at 4:51 PM, pallidin said:

Here's more to add, just for the heck of it. The following is an automatic AI-generated response to my Google query "When did humans first appear" 

"Homo sapiens evolved around 300,000 years ago. However, archaeology suggests that complex technology and cultures, or "behavioral modernity", evolved more recently, around 50,000-65,000 years ago. 

 
The first modern humans began moving outside of Africa starting about 70,000-100,000 years ago. The "out of Africa" migration theory states that modern humans originated in Africa within the past 200,000 years and evolved from the now extinct Homo erectus. 
 
Humans are the only known species to have successfully populated, adapted to, and significantly altered a wide variety of land regions across the world, resulting in profound historical and environmental impacts."
-------
 
Again, the above is an AI response, not professional,and as such is currently subject to inaccuracies and misrepresentations, so keep that in mind, but I found it interesting.

Behavior modernity certainly started a lot earlier. 

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