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Tech firms invest in effort to produce the world's first mass market robot


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Robots don't need to be humanoid to replace humans, its this logic that shows Figure AI and others are unqualified for the task. 

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On 2/25/2024 at 5:20 PM, L.A.T.1961 said:

Robots don't need to be humanoid to replace humans, its this logic that shows Figure AI and others are unqualified for the task. 

There is nothing wrong with the logic.

If you are building robots to fill in the gap in labour then it makes much more sense to have a mass produced humanoid robot that can work in any environment designed for humans than it does to have either expensive, bespoke, robots or to modify the work place, again at great expense.

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Filling a gap in labour? You mean filling jobs that (most of the time)businesses refuse to pay a decent wage?

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20 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

There is nothing wrong with the logic.

If you are building robots to fill in the gap in labour then it makes much more sense to have a mass produced humanoid robot that can work in any environment designed for humans than it does to have either expensive, bespoke, robots or to modify the work place, again at great expense.

It seems to me to be an unnecessary requirement, worse, I think humanoid robots are used because they are perceived to be 'Sexy' and more likely to create interest in the media for companies building and trying to sell these devices. 

It has nothing to do with the fact a humanoid robot will do the job better or more flexibly.

For example I don't see self driving car makers building human-like robots to drive a car or truck. There will be no robot chuffers anytime soon as its not necessary. 

Despite the fact it might seem like an obvious thing to do. 

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World's first mass market humanoid robot will probably be a military one.
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These robots might be flippin burgers at first, then later after many different burger joints, just go on welfare and smoke robot pot all day. Anyone think of that?!? stupid scientists.

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On 3/2/2024 at 11:52 PM, trevor borocz johnson said:

These robots might be flippin burgers at first, then later after many different burger joints, just go on welfare and smoke robot pot all day. Anyone think of that?!? stupid scientists.

Hey now, robots on welfare who smoke pot all day will surely robot-vote for our preferred candidate.

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On 2/25/2024 at 12:20 PM, L.A.T.1961 said:

Robots don't need to be humanoid to replace humans, its this logic that shows Figure AI and others are unqualified for the task. 

not necessarily. current equipment and work spaces are often configured for human shapes etc. there are some applications for humanoid robots.

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On 2/26/2024 at 11:37 AM, Waspie_Dwarf said:

There is nothing wrong with the logic.

If you are building robots to fill in the gap in labour then it makes much more sense to have a mass produced humanoid robot that can work in any environment designed for humans than it does to have either expensive, bespoke, robots or to modify the work place, again at great expense.

Is that a good assumption?  Does that necessitate a robot with a working expectancy of 40 years and the requirement to do multiple jobs?  Robot frames may be upgraded on a much more frequent basis, or scrapped and replaced depending on unit cost. Usually in business, a short term investment is preferable.  Buy a robot to do a specific job, or a hazardous job, then replace it or modify it to do another.  More than half of the jobs in the manufacturing plants I worked in required  only eyes and hands and the ability to perceive and act on the component present on the work station. 

Freeing the requirements of where to put legs, how to provide access to a work station and exit during emergency  makes for a more compact space and a chance to upgrade the process, a chance that Industrial Engineers and Process Engineers love to take advantage of when possible.  Cost savings all over th eplace.

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