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Flint with a hole, smelted in ancient times?


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The stone was found in 1994 in Syria. Weight - 650 grams. On one side the stone has a flat surface and an indentation, as if a hot stone was pressed against artificial parts. The through hole in the stone is about 2.5 cm long. Streams of stone spreading across the surface on one side of the hole leave the impression that it has been burned out by a laser. Judging by the appearance of the surface of the stone, traces of thermal effects are very ancient.

stone01234.jpg

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1 hour ago, vital said:

The stone was found in 1994 in Syria. Weight - 650 grams. On one side the stone has a flat surface and an indentation, as if a hot stone was pressed against artificial parts. The through hole in the stone is about 2.5 cm long. Streams of stone spreading across the surface on one side of the hole leave the impression that it has been burned out by a laser. Judging by the appearance of the surface of the stone, traces of thermal effects are very ancient.

stone01234.jpg

There is no visible thermal alteration whatsoever. It would be bright red.

Flint nodules are cavities created by boring crustaceans or molluscs which fill with gelatinous material, silicify and sometimes have holes like that

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1 hour ago, Piney said:

There is no visible thermal alteration whatsoever. It would be bright red.

Flint nodules are cavities created by boring crustaceans or molluscs which fill with gelatinous material, silicify and sometimes have holes like that

Agreed here.  Flint that's been altered by fire treatment is common here in the Southwest, and you can tell because it's got a very distinctive red color.

Flint%20Ridge6.png

Stones with holes in them are relatively common.  The hole you see was formed by something (an intrusion) that fell out.

Edited by Kenemet
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19 minutes ago, Kenemet said:

Agreed here.  Flint that's been altered by fire treatment is common here in the Southwest, and you can tell because it's got a very distinctive red color.

Flint%20Ridge6.png

Stones with holes in them are relatively common.  The hole you see was formed by something (an intrusion) that fell out.

That was originally tan. I was going to post this to show heat treating.5b58756be9948_Webp.net-resizeimage(8).jpg.861ab4ab540c9664fdc91e724a016119.jpg.488ebbc02fc0ef20796be6d2794170de.jpg

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These smooth surfaces (1, 2, 3) are not typical for natural formations. The combination of these surfaces and the opening may indicate thermal effects.

stone23456.jpg

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1 hour ago, vital said:

These smooth surfaces (1, 2, 3) are not typical for natural formations. The combination of these surfaces and the opening may indicate thermal effects.

stone23456.jpg

What made you think it's ancient and not modern?

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20 hours ago, vital said:

The stone was found in 1994 in Syria. Weight - 650 grams. On one side the stone has a flat surface and an indentation, as if a hot stone was pressed against artificial parts. The through hole in the stone is about 2.5 cm long. Streams of stone spreading across the surface on one side of the hole leave the impression that it has been burned out by a laser. Judging by the appearance of the surface of the stone, traces of thermal effects are very ancient.

stone01234.jpg

It is a hag stone

il_794xN.5229632910_8prp.jpg

I am sure the more one looks the more ancient technology one will find. The surface wear is very typical and not from "thermal effects" but rather various erosion from water. 

Edited by Thanos5150
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9 hours ago, vital said:

These smooth surfaces (1, 2, 3) are not typical for natural formations. The combination of these surfaces and the opening may indicate thermal effects.

stone23456.jpg

2 appears to be included material, possibly a fossil. 1 is either a vein or the remains of a weathering rind. 3 looks like a a natural fracture. Fine-grained quartz tends to produce smooth conchoidal (shell shaped) fracture surfaces. Image-search flint nodules and you'll see they come in all kinds of weird shapes.

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8 hours ago, Abramelin said:

What made you think it's ancient and not modern?

1. This stone was found in the ruins of the abandoned ancient fortress of Al-Jaber on the banks of the Euphrates River in Syria.
2. Judging by the ingrained salt deposits, the stone was in the ground or water for a long time

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Its a trace fossil, probably from a Belemnite, very common in the ancient cretaceous. Probably this Syrian stone comes from the sea where it has been made smoot by the movement in the sand. The hole is probably from a ancient Belemnite, a very common type of squid from the Mesozoic that either broke off or has eroded away. a example in the picture below

 

 

rock5769d_fossil.jpg

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15 hours ago, vital said:

These smooth surfaces (1, 2, 3) are not typical for natural formations. The combination of these surfaces and the opening may indicate thermal effects.

stone23456.jpg

take a walk down to the nearest beach and tell me again smooth surfaces are not natural

 

beach-stone-banner.jpg

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48 minutes ago, Poncho_Peanatus said:

Its a trace fossil, probably from a Belemnite, very common in the ancient cretaceous. Probably this Syrian stone comes from the sea where it has been made smoot by the movement in the sand. The hole is probably from a ancient Belemnite, a very common type of squid from the Mesozoic that either broke off or has eroded away. a example in the picture below

 

 

rock5769d_fossil.jpg

Squid pen. I didn't even see the post you quoted.

That's Dover flint in your picture, but on the outskirts of Rowan University's marl fossil pits you can grab them by the handfuls.

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squid pens or fairy candles....dear child has many names. 😂. I have a nice collection of them at home, the best place to collect them is in the fields or woods. The beach is not a good place, due to erosion.

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1 minute ago, Poncho_Peanatus said:

squid pens or fairy candles....dear child has many names. 😂. I have a nice collection of them at home, the best place to collect them is in the fields or woods. The beach is not a good place, due to erosion.

We have Cretaceous Era marl pits all over Gloucester County and because I work in woodland management I have access to most of the private ones. Fossil hunters heaven. I use to dig some good stuff out of Rowan's Fossil Park pits in Mantua before they owned it. 

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14 minutes ago, Piney said:

We have Cretaceous Era marl pits all over Gloucester County and because I work in woodland management I have access to most of the private ones. Fossil hunters heaven. I use to dig some good stuff out of Rowan's Fossil Park pits in Mantua before they owned it. 

Now im from Denmark, but its the same, you find all kind of fossils in the woodland. The best preserved ones....I have all types, even a trilobite but on this one I cheated, its not a find but I bought it in a souvenir shop in C California years ago

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18 minutes ago, Poncho_Peanatus said:

Now im from Denmark, but its the same, you find all kind of fossils in the woodland. The best preserved ones....I have all types, even a trilobite but on this one I cheated, its not a find but I bought it in a souvenir shop in C California years ago

I use to hit Bucks County in Pennsylvania along the Delaware for trilobites but one of my sister's friends has a rock shop so I cheat too.

Speaking of Cretaceous marls I know one farmer that's pulling out pieces of petrified cypress up to a meter and a half long and selling it.

Nice stuff but I have no room for that.....tempting though.....still thinking about it. 

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32 minutes ago, Poncho_Peanatus said:

Now im from Denmark, but its the same, you find all kind of fossils in the woodland. The best preserved ones....I have all types, even a trilobite but on this one I cheated, its not a find but I bought it in a souvenir shop in C California years ago

This is interesting. I dug this with a Late Archaic workshop in Southern New Jersey. A chert nodule core with a dart point that fits it.

5b58707bc5fb7_Webp.net-resizeimage(7).jpg.da192171df2bfe7e86c41064f9901ff1.jpg

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15 minutes ago, Piney said:

I use to hit Bucks County in Pennsylvania along the Delaware for trilobites but one of my sister's friends has a rock shop so I cheat too.

Speaking of Cretaceous marls I know one farmer that's pulling out pieces of petrified cypress up to a meter and a half long and selling it.

Nice stuff but I have no room for that.....tempting though.....still thinking about it. 

interesting I love paleobotany, tempting, I agree but one meter...thats to big.

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5 minutes ago, Piney said:

This is interesting. I dug this with a Late Archaic workshop in Southern New Jersey. A chert nodule core with a dart point that fits it.

5b58707bc5fb7_Webp.net-resizeimage(7).jpg.da192171df2bfe7e86c41064f9901ff1.jpg

thats quite a find...a dart point? you mean it broke off or? any microfossils in it?

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25 minutes ago, Poncho_Peanatus said:

thats quite a find...a dart point? you mean it broke off or? any microfossils in it?

No, the bow and arrow didn't come to North America yet and they used atlatls. 

No fossils in it. I did have a points made with Triassic dinosaur bone, there are chunks everywhere in the glacial washes but no pictures.

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39 minutes ago, Poncho_Peanatus said:

interesting I love paleobotany, tempting, I agree but one meter...thats to big.

I have petrified pine all over here, in the house, garden and on the porch. I'll take some pictures and text @tcgram with them so she can post them someday. 

Maybe we should start a fossil thread over in the paleo subforum. 

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8 hours ago, Poncho_Peanatus said:

take a walk down to the nearest beach and tell me again smooth surfaces are not natural

 

beach-stone-banner.jpg

This meant smooth surfaces of regular cylindrical shape (2). Like smooth flat surfaces (1), this is not typical for natural formations

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8 hours ago, vital said:

This meant smooth surfaces of regular cylindrical shape (2). Like smooth flat surfaces (1), this is not typical for natural formations

It depends on where it was at in the water and what was rubbing on it. But it is natural.

 

 

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9 hours ago, Kenemet said:

I'd known (but forgotten) that these are also called "hag stones" and are considered lucky: https://www.horniman.ac.uk/story/hag-stones-and-lucky-charms/

I think there's somewhere a museum dedicated to these stones.

Me too. Mormons called them "peep stones" and used them for scrying if I remember right. 

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