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Viral video shows yogi in deep meditation during heavy snowstorm


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Hmm, not too sure. No snow on his eyebrows or hands. I wonder how long he was out there?

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8 minutes ago, ouija ouija said:

Hmm, not too sure. No snow on his eyebrows or hands. I wonder how long he was out there?

Long enough to get a video took probably. 

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28 minutes ago, XenoFish said:

Long enough to get a video took probably. 

I wonder what @ChrLzs has to say. The background looks off.

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3 minutes ago, Piney said:

I wonder what @ChrLzs has to say. The background looks off.

The whole thing looks fake. The lack of breath vapor too.

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Yep, meditation can do such things. Meditation makes the whole body work in the most natural way possible according to the environment it's placed in. Just look at the deep red color of his skin: his organism keeps itself warm by intensely burning up calories. But Agni Yoga? May be Hatha Yoga? Agni Yoga is not the traditional Indian yoga, it's the modern sort of teaching developed by Nicholas Roerich and Madame Blavatski.

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1 minute ago, XenoFish said:

The whole thing looks fake. The lack of breath vapor too.

When meditating the breath becomes very light. I am practicing meditation, so I know firsthand.

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1 minute ago, Chaldon said:

When meditating the breath becomes very light. I am practicing meditation, so I know firsthand.

You're not the only one who's meditated. Still doesn't debunk my assertion. 

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2 minutes ago, Chaldon said:

When meditating the breath becomes very light. I am practicing meditation, so I know firsthand.

Funny, I can still see my breath when I'm doing it outdoors.

1 minute ago, XenoFish said:

You're not the only one who's meditated. Still doesn't debunk my assertion. 

Yep..

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The last 12 seconds: The cameraman is walking backwards on sloping, uneven, snow-covered ground, yet the camera remains almost perfectly stable. Impossible. 

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1 hour ago, simplybill said:

The last 12 seconds: The cameraman is walking backwards on sloping, uneven, snow-covered ground, yet the camera remains almost perfectly stable. Impossible. 

They do have Steadicams to stabilize when a cameraman is moving although they look like quite the apparatus with movie cameras, although it sounds like they now have some for phones now also but don't know what is involved.  I'm not sure what the alternative is that explains the video if it's not a cameraman walking backwards, a drone or animation?

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50 minutes ago, Liquid Gardens said:

 I'm not sure what the alternative is that explains the video if it's not a cameraman walking backwards, a drone or animation?

I think it would have to be some very expensive camera equipment to capture that scene, in that terrain (such as a well-anchored boom camera). I can’t imagine that type of equipment being readily available in a mountaintop monastery.

And walking backwards in that sloping terrain in those weather conditions, would (in my opinion) have to involve some sort of death wish. Even in the best of conditions, my head would be swiveling back and forth in search of safe footholds, and my arms would be swaying around to balance myself. 

Another thing that caught my attention was the lack of sound coming from the cameraman. In those weather conditions there should be sniffling, throat clearing, and breathing sounds. All of those sounds would be involuntary, and/or extremely difficult to control, especially in a 59-second video.

ETA: The background looks too focused for a phone camera. That and the other questionable aspects of the video makes me think it was AI generated. 

Edited by simplybill
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Yeah, I've heard the stories of people doing superhuman things because of meditation.. pretty awesome.

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<self-deleted for editing errors

 
Edited by papageorge1
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In Vedic/Indian traditions certain advanced masters attain Siddhis (paranormal/magical powers). I am a believer such things are real from the investigation of western observers who I respect.

 

One of those is: 

advandvam: tolerance of heat, cold and other dualities.

I asked about this in my Bing Co-pilot and got:

In the realm of yoga and meditation, there exists a concept known as siddhis—extraordinary abilities or superhuman powers that can be attained through dedicated practice. Let’s explore how these siddhis relate to meditating in cold environments:

Tolerance of Heat and Cold (Advandvam):

One of the siddhis mentioned in ancient texts is the ability to withstand extreme temperatures. Practitioners who attain this siddhi can sit comfortably in snow-laden mountains without feeling cold or remain unaffected even when sitting in the midst of fire12.

This power is not magical but rather an extraordinary capacity that everyone possesses. However, distractions often prevent us from accessing it reliably.

Regular practice of yoga and meditation is essential for cultivating this ability.

Meditation and Siddhis:

According to sage Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras, diligent practice of meditation leads to the attainment of siddhis.

These siddhis are not regarded as miracles; they are ordinary capacities that can be refined through focused practice.

While psychic abilities may manifest spontaneously for most people, the siddhis are said to be highly reliable and under conscious control.

Some of the advanced siddhis include invisibility, levitation, invulnerability, and superstrength—abilities often associated with comic book superheroes3.

In summary, if you aspire to meditate in the cold with ease, consider incorporating regular meditation and yoga practice into your routine. The siddhis are not elusive miracles but rather latent abilities waiting to be awakened through dedicated effort. 🧘‍♂️❄️

 

Further From Wikipedia:

 

Five siddhis, according to Vaishnava doctrine[edit]

In the Bhagavata Purana, the five siddhis brought on by yoga and meditation are:

trikālajñatvam: knowing the past, present and future.

advandvam: tolerance of heat, cold and other dualities.

para citta ādi abhijñatā: knowing the minds of others, etc.

agni arka ambu viṣa ādīnām pratiṣṭambhaḥ: checking the influence of fire, sun, water, poison, etc.

aparājayah: remaining unconquered by others.[9]

Ten secondary siddhis, according to Vaishnava doctrine[edit]

In the Bhagavata Purana, Krishna describes the ten secondary siddhis:[citation needed]

anūrmimattvam: Being undisturbed by hunger, thirst, and other bodily appetites.

dūraśravaṇa: Hearing things far away.

dūradarśanam: Seeing things far away.

manojavah: Moving the body wherever thought goes (teleportation/astral projection).

kāmarūpam: Assuming any form desired.

parakāya praveśanam: Entering the bodies of others.

svachanda mṛtyuh: Dying when one desires.

devānām saha krīḍā anudarśanam: Witnessing and participating in the pastimes of the gods.

yathā saṅkalpa saṁsiddhiḥ: Perfect accomplishment of one's determination.

ājñāpratihatā gatiḥ: Orders or commands being unimpeded.[

 

Dr. Dean Radin is one who has written a book on Siddhis called 'Real Magic'.

Edited by papageorge1
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I think the video is AI-generated, but it’s possible that the story itself may be legitimate.

I found this article from November 1963 in journals.physiology.org, but only the abstract is outside of the paywall.

“Body temperature and respiratory experiments are reported on a Nepalese pilgrim who survived, uninjured, 4 days of exposure at 15,000–17,500 ft in midwinter, wearing only light clothing and no shoes or gloves. His resistance to cold depended on elevation of metabolism and, unlike tolerance of immersion in cold water, was not related to subcutaneous fat thickness. He slept soundly in spite of the cold and so did not become exhausted. In 3–4-hr experiments at o C (clothed), rectal temperature and skin temperature over the trunk showed only minor changes; hand and foot temperatures did not fall below 10–13 C. Maintenance of body temperature was accounted for by elevation of metabolism.“

https://journals.physiology.org/doi/pdf/10.1152/jappl.1963.18.6.1234

 

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40 minutes ago, simplybill said:

I think the video is AI-generated, but it’s possible that the story itself may be legitimate.

I found this article from November 1963 in journals.physiology.org, but only the abstract is outside of the paywall.

“Body temperature and respiratory experiments are reported on a Nepalese pilgrim who survived, uninjured, 4 days of exposure at 15,000–17,500 ft in midwinter, wearing only light clothing and no shoes or gloves. His resistance to cold depended on elevation of metabolism and, unlike tolerance of immersion in cold water, was not related to subcutaneous fat thickness. He slept soundly in spite of the cold and so did not become exhausted. In 3–4-hr experiments at o C (clothed), rectal temperature and skin temperature over the trunk showed only minor changes; hand and foot temperatures did not fall below 10–13 C. Maintenance of body temperature was accounted for by elevation of metabolism.“

https://journals.physiology.org/doi/pdf/10.1152/jappl.1963.18.6.1234

Nepalese are a little different. I was always surprised by the Gurkha who were former SAS employed by Corporate Measures. They were mini Terminators who could withstand anything. 

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28 minutes ago, Piney said:

Nepalese are a little different. I was always surprised by the Gurkha who were former SAS employed by Corporate Measures. They were mini Terminators who could withstand anything. 

I remember reading about the Ghurka soldiers a few years ago. I found this article just now: 

“10 Stories That Prove Gurkhas Are the Fiercest Fighters on the Planet”

https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/research/g2173/10-amazing-gurkha-stories/

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The video seems real but would bet that the claims and story are fake. Let's see a 10 minute version of this before jumping to conclusions. I'm suspicious that there's no ice formation from snow melted by his body heat that later refreezes. You will often see this in the beard, mustache, nose hair areas where icicles form due to snow melting from body heat and vapor from breathing. I'd bet he wasn't there for long. 

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