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Historic Texas wildfires rage toward U.S. nuclear weapon facility


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Sixty counties in the Texas panhandle have been issued with a disaster declaration as rapidly-spreading wildfires forced the evacuation of several towns and America's main nuclear weapons storage facility. 

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) issued the declaration on Tuesday (Feb 28.), activating emergency response teams to fight the fires. 

One of the blazes raged disconcertingly close to the Pantex Plant — the main facility which assembles and disassembles the U.S. nuclear arsenal — forcing the site to pause operations until further notice. 

https://www.livescience.com/planet-earth/climate-change/historic-texas-wildfires-rage-toward-us-nuclear-weapon-facility

https://gov.texas.gov/news/post/governor-abbott-issues-disaster-declaration-for-texas-wildfires

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Looks like it has crossed the line into Oklahoma.

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I was just reading about the fires this morning on my WFAA app while drinking coffee.   Fire is both the boon and bane of mankind.  Nothing is more scarier than a fire out of control...it moves with the wind.  And in West Texas...there is absolutely nothing to block the wind.  

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There is a wildfire down in Texas that has been burning for a bit: Texas Wildfire Map - Current Texas Wildfires, Forest Fires, and Lightning Strikes | Fire, Weather & Avalanche Center (fireweatheravalanche.org)

The second largest (so far) in their history.

An 83yr old lady died because her house burnt down and she couldn't evacuate: Texas wildfires live updates: At least one killed as over a million acres burn across Panhandle (yahoo.com)

It also forced the shut down of a nuclear facility:Texas wildfires forces shutdown at nuclear weapon facility. Here is what we know (msn.com)

It's also pretty close to Amarillo, a fairly decent sized city.

Edit to add: Oops, didnt see that someone started a thread already.

 

Edited by Gromdor
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45 minutes ago, joc said:

I was just reading about the fires this morning on my WFAA app while drinking coffee.   Fire is both the boon and bane of mankind.  Nothing is more scarier than a fire out of control...it moves with the wind.  And in West Texas...there is absolutely nothing to block the wind.  

Yeah, in New Mexico we have places like that too, but the fires tend to be in the mountains here.   The first always goes uphill and the mountains are high.

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“If I owned Texas and Hell, I would rent out Texas and live in Hell”

 General Philip Henry Sheridan.

Seems like an appropriate comment at this point.  Sad to see, the views are so sod sad.  I still have relatives in Amarillo and Oklahoma City, they are OK so far, not close to Amarillo yet.

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9 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

“If I owned Texas and Hell, I would rent out Texas and live in Hell”

 General Philip Henry Sheridan.

Seems like an appropriate comment at this point.  Sad to see, the views are so sod sad.  I still have relatives in Amarillo and Oklahoma City, they are OK so far, not close to Amarillo yet.

My Dad lives just WSW of Amarillo.  Checking to see if his house burnt down was what got me on this post.

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I kinda thought that the thread would have more interest because of the nuclear facility that might burn down.  It dismantles nuclear weaponry and the thought of a fire burning a nuclear weapon or ten might raise a few eyebrows or fears of clouds of radioactive ash.

Being prior military, I am confident of the safeguards surrounding nuclear weapons, but I get a bit leery when we contract it out to a private company in a state known for it's lax regulations.

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2 hours ago, Gromdor said:

I kinda thought that the thread would have more interest because of the nuclear facility that might burn down.  It dismantles nuclear weaponry and the thought of a fire burning a nuclear weapon or ten might raise a few eyebrows or fears of clouds of radioactive ash.

Being prior military, I am confident of the safeguards surrounding nuclear weapons, but I get a bit leery when we contract it out to a private company in a state known for it's lax regulations.

Are we talking about Pantex?  My Late Uncle worked at Pantex.  I still have relatives and friends that live in Amarillo.

Edited by joc
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1 hour ago, joc said:

Are we talking about Pantex?  My Late Uncle worked at Pantex.  I still have relatives and friends that live in Amarillo.

Yup, Pantex.  I recall a story about a nuke almost blowing up there back in 2005 or so.

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5 hours ago, joc said:

I was just reading about the fires this morning on my WFAA app while drinking coffee.   Fire is both the boon and bane of mankind.  Nothing is more scarier than a fire out of control...it moves with the wind.  And in West Texas...there is absolutely nothing to block the wind.  

I can give that an amen.  I helped do an install of medical software at a little hospital in Dalhart once.  Coon Memorial.  The winds were so steady in speed and direction that the trees all seemed to lean the same way.  The aroma that came off those feed lots twice a day would make your eyes water ;) 

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39 minutes ago, and-then said:

I can give that an amen.  I helped do an install of medical software at a little hospital in Dalhart once.  Coon Memorial.  The winds were so steady in speed and direction that the trees all seemed to lean the same way.  The aroma that came off those feed lots twice a day would make your eyes water ;) 

Good on you.  I've been through Dalhart a few times in the old days with my dad.  

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13 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

Good on you.  I've been through Dalhart a few times in the old days with my dad.  

We were only there for a week or so but I remember it being a friendly little town and they were excited about a kind of festival that was upcoming that was a tradition dating back to the massive cattle drives :)   

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30 minutes ago, and-then said:

We were only there for a week or so but I remember it being a friendly little town and they were excited about a kind of festival that was upcoming that was a tradition dating back to the massive cattle drives :)   

Do you remember passing through the even smaller towns of Claude and Goodnight?  Both named for the early rancher Charles Goodnight who was an organizer of those early drives. Before railroad connections, it was  a necessity to drive cattle to a railhead in Kansas, Oklahoma, or Colorado.  Not an undertaking for the faint of heart.  

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It's been many years and I can't recall those names in particular.  I just remember the place had two industries.  Prisons, and agriculture.

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TexasPanhandle3.thumb.png.1b23881e1118f47dc267daa54a82db84.png

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15 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

Do you remember passing through the even smaller towns of Claude and Goodnight?  Both named for the early rancher Charles Goodnight who was an organizer of those early drives. Before railroad connections, it was  a necessity to drive cattle to a railhead in Kansas, Oklahoma, or Colorado.  Not an undertaking for the faint of heart.  

Goodnight and Loving were the two men from history where the series Lonesome Dove was loosely based on. 

Captain Call was Goodnight and Gus McCrae was Loving and Loving was actually killed by Indians on a cattle drive. 

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4 minutes ago, Buzz_Light_Year said:

Goodnight and Loving were the two men from history where the series Lonesome Dove was loosely based on. 

Captain Call was Goodnight and Gus McCrae was Loving and Loving was actually killed by Indians on a cattle drive. 

There is a town named after Loving in New Mexico.   He was no hero, just a greedy cattle rancher.

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Its the strong winds that blames the climate changes💀

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4 hours ago, docyabut2 said:

Its the strong winds that blames the climate changes💀

There have always been strong winds in that area, that is not what causes the climate changes.   It does make it harder to put out large fires.

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Are all these unusual massive wildfires happening elsewhere, or just in North America?

 

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18 hours ago, Alex_Rogan said:

Are all these unusual massive wildfires happening elsewhere, or just in North America?

 

How strange would that be if they only happened in one continent.   It is a very weird question, maybe you could look at some world news once in a while.

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/global-maps/MOD14A1_M_FIRE

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