Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

Human Longevity & The 'Power 9' Rule


pallidin

Recommended Posts

Every day we’re inundated with the “right” things to do to live a longer life. Drink eight glasses of water a day, they say. Go to the pharmacy for an off-label prescription, advise others. And others task us with the impossible—yet promising—task to just keep a positive mindset.

Today, the average life expectancy of an American is 76.4 years, and in 2023 over 70,000 Americans reached their 100th birthday. But in the Blue Zones, or regions of the world where people live exceptionally long lives, individuals are ten times more likely to live to 100. These places—specifically the Barbagia region of Sardinia, Italy, Okinawa, Japan, Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica; and Icaria, Greece—are packed with centenarians.

It was only a matter of time until medical researchers, demographers, epidemiologists, and anthropologists dug in to find out the common denominators among these places. Thus, emerges the Blue Zones “Power Nine”—or nine things that the five places who have the highest proportions of people who reach age 100—have in common. National Geographic’s Dan Buettner, published these findings in his book, The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who've Lived the Longest. We tapped our own longevity experts to weigh in on each of the nine pillars.

 

Read more here:

https://www.gq.com/story/blue-zones-power-9

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Probably the number one on the list is don't eat processed food.   (fast food, frozen dinners, canned food, packet food, etc.)  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Probably the number one on the list is don't eat processed food.   (fast food, frozen dinners, canned food, packet food, etc.)  

I read the list.  Probably the second number one would be alleviate STRESS.  You know, if  someone is going to get stressed about every single red light?  Or stressed trying to identify police before you get pulled over for speeding...just being in a hurry all the time.  

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think they left out a really important contributor to longevity for all of us, and that is keeping the extra weight off. I am not talking about a few extra pounds or 10 to 12 pounds over our accepted weight limits, we don't have to be super skinny like the supermodels :lol:, I mean when we become obese or when we get close to obesity with our extra weight. And also in combination with gaining all that extra weight, what is worse is continuing on yo-yo diets to try and lose those heavy extra pounds, only to gain them back again and then lose the weight again. Because it may cause diabetes and heart disease issues later on.

 I worked in two nursing homes in my earlier nursing career and the one common denominator I noticed about the seniors who lived the longest was their weight. Most of them kept the extra weight off and most lived to be close to a hundred or more. The power 9 rules are helpful rules to go by, but I think maintaining our weight is the biggest factor of all.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Katniss said:

I think they left out a really important contributor to longevity for all of us, and that is keeping the extra weight off. I am not talking about a few extra pounds or 10 to 12 pounds over our accepted weight limits, we don't have to be super skinny like the supermodels :lol:, I mean when we become obese or when we get close to obesity with our extra weight. And also in combination with gaining all that extra weight, what is worse is continuing on yo-yo diets to try and lose those heavy extra pounds, only to gain them back again and then lose the weight again. Because it may cause diabetes and heart disease issues later on.

 I worked in two nursing homes in my earlier nursing career and the one common denominator I noticed about the seniors who lived the longest was their weight. Most of them kept the extra weight off and most lived to be close to a hundred or more. The power 9 rules are helpful rules to go by, but I think maintaining our weight is the biggest factor of all.

I think the wording should be "maintain a healthy weight" which includes making sure you are not too thin.   It isn't all about fat, it is about the right amount of fat your body needs for optimum health, which is different than "keeping extra weight off".  There are no valid charts to determine how much any individual "should" weigh.  If you can afford one of those boyancy tests that accurately determines your fat index and you use that, ok, but just going by age, height, and weight is not enough.   

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

I think the wording should be "maintain a healthy weight" which includes making sure you are not too thin.   It isn't all about fat, it is about the right amount of fat your body needs for optimum health, which is different than "keeping extra weight off".  There are no valid charts to determine how much any individual "should" weigh.  If you can afford one of those boyancy tests that accurately determines your fat index and you use that, ok, but just going by age, height, and weight is not enough.   

Usually your doctor can calculate close to what your healthy weight should be. I never go by those silly height, age, weight charts. They are misleading. I go by what my own doctor tells me and I found that his calculations of what my weight should be is spot on. And it's not even close to what those charts say. If I went by what those charts say I would get dangerously close to anorexia. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

of course those things already mentioned are critical. my mind immediately wondered if there's a correlation with alkalinity/acidity of the environments. just based on a quick look, it seems like it's possible there's some loose correlation there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, Katniss said:

Usually your doctor can calculate close to what your healthy weight should be. I never go by those silly height, age, weight charts. They are misleading. I go by what my own doctor tells me and I found that his calculations of what my weight should be is spot on. And it's not even close to what those charts say. If I went by what those charts say I would get dangerously close to anorexia. :lol:

I have not yet met a doctor who would even try.  They look at my chart and no matter what I have come to see the for, all they do is fuss at me about my weight and try to give me  a prescription for statin drugs because I am over 50, overweight and female.  

If you know of a doctor that actually would calculate what my healthy weight is I would go to that doctor.    I know what a healthy weight for me is, I do have about 40 extra pounds on me but based on height and weight and age some army doctor labeled me obese because I weighed 145 pounds when I got my army physical, but for some reason that did not disqualify me  🤪.  No muscle was taken into accoiunt because I am female.    

I went through army basic training with women who were 30 pounds overweight, and the ones that made it through the first week had to get new uniforms after 2 weeks because they had lost all their "baby fat".   But my weight did not change, I was in good shape. My bone structure (size 10 shoes at the age of 13 when I was only 5'3" - finally grew almost 2 more inches taller by the time I was 18) made the charts totally wrong for me and even 50 years later I have seen no change in attitude from people (specifically doctors) about women's weight. (even women are confused for the most part).     

Edited by Desertrat56
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

I have not yet met a doctor who would even try.  They look at my chart and no matter what I have come to see the for, all they do is fuss at me about my weight and try to give me  a prescription for statin drugs because I am over 50, overweight and female.  

If you know of a doctor that actually would calculate what my healthy weight is I would go to that doctor.    I know what a healthy weight for me is, I do have about 40 extra pounds on me but based on height and weight and age some army doctor labeled me obese because I weighed 145 pounds when I got my army physical, but for some reason that did not disqualify me  🤪.  No muscle was taken into accoiunt because I am female.    

I went through army basic training with women who were 30 pounds overweight, and the ones that made it through the first week had to get new uniforms after 2 weeks because they had lost all their "baby fat".   But my weight did not change, I was in good shape. My bone structure (size 10 shoes at the age of 13 when I was only 5'3" - finally grew almost 2 more inches taller by the time I was 18) made the charts totally wrong for me and even 50 years later I have seen no change in attitude from people (specifically doctors) about women's weight. (even women are confused for the most part).     

Okay the only extra fat that concerns me and my doctor is what is around my waist. Meaning what in our abdominal area is healthy weight and not healthy weight. Too much fat in the abdominal area is what is to be concerned about, because of how it can affect our organs and overall health in the long run. It doesn't mean we need to have ridiculously flat stomachs, but concerns how much fat should actually be there. What I am really referring to is this, we all know the difference between a small pooch or pouch, not usually a concern, versus a pot belly or apple belly which is usually too much unhealthy fat in our abdominal area.  So let's not kid ourselves.:D

This link to a health article about how unreliable BMI are, but comes close to what I am talking about at the bottom of the page on the information about caliper pinch tests and the measurements around our waists.

Body mass index: What it can (and can’t) tell you about your health

 

Edited by Katniss
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.