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Tardigrades in space: could they have colonized the Moon ?


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Posted (edited)

This is sadly not a singular event. I mean sure Tardigrades are the cutest, but germs in space will be a real problem for us in our search for life in space, because we carry it where ever we go becuase of a few extra $ costs.

Here is one more colourful example:

Quote

If you had mysophobia, where might you go to be safe from germs? Some people might think outer space would be a good place to go. After all, there is no air in space. And all that radiation would kill off all the germs, right?

The truth may surprise you. In fact, it turns out that over 250 different species of bacteria and fungi can survive in outer space. Even more shocking, they actually thrive there.

For example, the Russian space station Mir encountered problems with a film growing over its windows. This hurt the crew’s ability to see while in orbit. Upon its return to Earth, scientists were shocked to find many bacteria and fungi covering the window.

Moreover, the small organisms had done more than just coat the window and block astronauts’ views of space. They had actually damaged the window. This concerned scientists. The window was made of quartz glass in a titanium frame encased in enamel. Scientists thought the windows could withstand just about anything.

full article

Edited by MrsGently
t minus breakdown
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9 hours ago, MrsGently said:

This is sadly not a singular event. I mean sure Tardigrades are the cutest, but germs in space will be a real problem for us in our search for life in space, because we carry it where ever we go becuase of a few extra $ costs.

Here is one more colourful example:

full article

Bacteria thrive inside the Space Station...but only because there is water on the space station.  Tardigrades nor any other life form could ever colonize the moon...because there is no water on the moon.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, joc said:

Bacteria thrive inside the Space Station...but only because there is water on the space station.  Tardigrades nor any other life form could ever colonize the moon...because there is no water on the moon.

No water, or do you mean very little? I mean NASA has definitely disagreed. Is there even a reason we assumed there aren't already tardigrades present? Also, to clear things up...   "Four strains of bacteria, three of which were previously unknown to science, have been found on the space station."   "previous studies had suggested that certain resilient strains of bacteria could survive the harsh conditions of space, including dried pellets of Deinococcus bacteria – listed in the Guinness World Records as the world’s toughest – which survived on the space station’s surface for three years. "

Edited by Nicolette
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Not to mention that we left 96 bags of poop on the moon... hardly a sterile environment.

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8 hours ago, Nicolette said:

No water, or do you mean very little? I mean NASA has definitely disagreed. Is there even a reason we assumed there aren't already tardigrades present? Also, to clear things up...   "Four strains of bacteria, three of which were previously unknown to science, have been found on the space station."   "previous studies had suggested that certain resilient strains of bacteria could survive the harsh conditions of space, including dried pellets of Deinococcus bacteria – listed in the Guinness World Records as the world’s toughest – which survived on the space station’s surface for three years. "

What are the four strains previously known to science?  

There is no water on the moon.  Consequently, tardigrades could not colonize the moon.  It's not even questionable.

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9 hours ago, Nicolette said:

No water, or do you mean very little? I mean NASA has definitely disagreed. Is there even a reason we assumed there aren't already tardigrades present? Also, to clear things up...   "Four strains of bacteria, three of which were previously unknown to science, have been found on the space station."   "previous studies had suggested that certain resilient strains of bacteria could survive the harsh conditions of space, including dried pellets of Deinococcus bacteria – listed in the Guinness World Records as the world’s toughest – which survived on the space station’s surface for three years. "

In the article from my previous post

Quote

Some bacteria did succumb to these harsh conditions. But a group of bacteria known as OU-20 survived for over a year and a half on the outside of the ISS! Researchers now have samples of these hardy survivors back on Earth for further study.

 

NASA on the topic of water in space:

Quote

The Hubble Space Telescope peered into the Helix Nebula and found water molecules. Hydrogen and oxygen, formed by different processes, combine to make water molecules in the ejected atmosphere of this dying star. The origins of our oceans are in the stars.

NIH on the potential survival time for bacteria in an environment without water (just for completion)

Quote

In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1.

 

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11 hours ago, Nicolette said:

No water, or do you mean very little? I mean NASA has definitely disagreed.

You have totally misunderstood the discovery of water on the moon. There have been two discoveries. The first is that there is water ICE in the permanently dark craters at the lunar poles. This is useful for mankind, but unusable for tardigrades... we can melt it.

The second discovery is that lunar rocks and soil contain water, HOWEVER, this is chemically bound to the rocks and soil and so, once again, is useful for future astronauts but not usable for tardigrades.

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1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

You have totally misunderstood the discovery of water on the moon. There have been two discoveries. The first is that there is water ICE in the permanently dark craters at the lunar poles. This is useful for mankind, but unusable for tardigrades... we can melt it.

The second discovery is that lunar rocks and soil contain water, HOWEVER, this is chemically bound to the rocks and soil and so, once again, is useful for future astronauts but not usable for tardigrades.

Thank you my reply was really more a drive-by for the poster above that

Quote

Bacteria thrive inside the Space Station...but only because there is water on the space station. ...

Because sadly blocking them means they can still quote me somehow?

I feel a little under attack but I guess that is just because being cute and funny makes you paranoid.

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17 minutes ago, MrsGently said:

Thank you my reply was really more a drive-by for the poster above that

It wasn't you I was replying to.

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6 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

It wasn't you I was replying to.

I know. I still wanted to say thank you for the correct answer and explain why I gave nicolette the technically wrong one.

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5 hours ago, joc said:

What are the four strains previously known to science?  

There is no water on the moon.  Consequently, tardigrades could not colonize the moon.  It's not even questionable.

You mean water in its liquid state or any water?  I don't think we have determined that there is no water at all.

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3 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

You mean water in its liquid state or any water?  I don't think we have determined that there is no water at all.

Liquid water. We have determined that there is water ice at the poles and water chemically locked up in the rocks and soil.

Liquid water can not exist on the surface of the moon. At low pressures water sublimes, it turns straight from a solid into a gas (like CO2 [dry ice] does on earth). Any liquid water would instantly boil away. The high day time temperatures mean that water ice can not exist on must of the lunar surface either. At the poles there are some crater floors that are permanently in shadow, this is where the water ice exists and is the reason that the most of the many spacecraft which will be landing on the moon in the next few years will be doing so at the poles.

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4 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Liquid water. We have determined that there is water ice at the poles and water chemically locked up in the rocks and soil.

Liquid water can not exist on the surface of the moon. At low pressures water sublimes, it turns straight from a solid into a gas (like CO2 [dry ice] does on earth). Any liquid water would instantly boil away. The high day time temperatures mean that water ice can not exist on must of the lunar surface either. At the poles there are some crater floors that are permanently in shadow, this is where the water ice exists and is the reason that the most of the many spacecraft which will be landing on the moon in the next few years will be doing so at the poles.

Yeah, so I was wondering what joc meant when he said there was no water on the moon.  Not that I think tardigrades can colonize the moon,  but I did think some water existed as ice and as maybe hydrated minerals.

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1 hour ago, Tatetopa said:

Yeah, so I was wondering what joc meant when he said there was no water on the moon.  Not that I think tardigrades can colonize the moon,  but I did think some water existed as ice and as maybe hydrated minerals.

Tardigrades thrive on water in my understanding.  They dry up and can be reconstituted if water is available.  There is no water on the moon for them to 'colonize'.  and there never will be so it is a  non-sequitur.

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