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NASA’s Juno Mission Measures Oxygen Production at Europa


Waspie_Dwarf

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NASA’s Juno Mission Measures Oxygen Production at Europa

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e1c-pia25695-europa_globe_already_in_pj.thumb.webp.830d2fa68dc4a6a80a3df0c41813acda.webp

 

This view of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa was captured by the JunoCam imager aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft during the mission’s close flyby on Sept. 29, 2022.
Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
Image processing: Kevin M. Gill CC BY 3.0 

The ice-covered Jovian moon generates 1,000 tons of oxygen every 24 hours – enough to keep a million humans breathing for a day.

Scientists with NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter have calculated the rate of oxygen being produced at the Jovian moon Europa to be substantially less than most previous studies. Published on March 4 in Nature Astronomy, the findings were derived by measuring hydrogen outgassing from the icy moon’s surface using data collected by the spacecraft’s Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE) instrument.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

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I thought europa was hypothesized to be habitable under the crust, not in the atmosphere. The article also still labelled the atmosphere "oxygen rich". Aside from atmosphere loss i find it hard to believe that a ball of H2O is too low on O for life

. Not to mention that there is life here in mono lake that doesn't require oxygen, so it's a bit shortsighted and premature to decide all life elswhere requires it.

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8 minutes ago, Nicolette said:

I thought europa was hypothesized to be habitable under the crust, not in the atmosphere.

I find myself asking this virtually every time you comment on a science story... have you actually read the article?

From the front page story:

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And there is some evidence of the presence of basic chemical elements on the surface - including carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulphur - used by life on Earth. Some of these could seep down into the water from the atmosphere and surface.

From the NASA release I linked to:

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Scientists believe that some of the oxygen produced in this manner could work its way into the moon’s subsurface ocean as a possible source of metabolic energy.

 

10 minutes ago, Nicolette said:

The article also still labelled the atmosphere "oxygen rich".

And your point is? The atmosphere is extremely sparse. From the front page article:

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Telescope observations, meanwhile, reveal a weak, oxygen-rich atmosphere.

 

25 minutes ago, Nicolette said:

Not to mention that there is life here in mono lake that doesn't require oxygen

Care to provide a source for this claim?

In 2010 two NASA scientists proposed that some of the bacteria in Mono lake used arsenic instead of phosphorous (not oxygen). In 2012 these claims were shown to be untrue.

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The bacterium in arsenic-rich Mono Lake was said to redefine the building blocks of life, surviving and growing by swapping phosphorus for arsenic in its DNA and cell membranes.

Biologists consider these six elements as necessary for life: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur.

Arsenic is similar to phosphorus but is typically poisonous to living organisms.

Source: https://phys.org/news/2012-07-scientists-nasa-arsenic-life-untrue.html

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The whole food chain of the lake is based on the high population of single-celled planktonic algae present in the photic zone of the lake. These algae reproduce rapidly during winter and early spring after winter runoff brings nutrients to the surface layer of water. By March the lake is "as green as pea soup" with photosynthesizing algae.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mono_Lake

So not relevant to Europa.

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12 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

I find myself asking this virtually every time you comment on a science story... have you actually read the article?

From the front page story:

From the NASA release I linked to:

 

And your point is? The atmosphere is extremely sparse. From the front page article:

 

Care to provide a source for this claim?

In 2010 two NASA scientists proposed that some of the bacteria in Mono lake used arsenic instead of phosphorous (not oxygen). In 2012 these claims were shown to be untrue.

Source: https://phys.org/news/2012-07-scientists-nasa-arsenic-life-untrue.html

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mono_Lake

So not relevant to Europa.

Pretty much like every time i post, you were too focused on trying to prove me wrong to even realize that you flat out missed the point.

Yes realizing that life doesnt have to have identicle processes to us is relevant to europa and the ridiculous conclusion that there isn't life because the atmosphere is thin and not all oxygen like people thought. Our atmosphere isnt all oxygen either.

Not that it even matters when we are talking about an ocean planet hypothesized to be habitable in the ocean under a thick worldwide ice shell. Nobody thought any potantiel life down there was breathing the air anyways. 

Clearly, I was responding to the title of this page which reads ""Hopes for life on Europa diminish as probe finds lower oxygen levels" so why are you asking my point? What is your point in getting your panties in a wad and talking down on me over your own shortsightedness and confusion anytime you find someone actually interested in your topics? No wonder its gotten so dead here.

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Also I threw out a random incorrect example. If you were wise enough to get past in instead of trying to prove me wrong you would notice that we do have a species here on earth, henneguya salminicola, that doesn't require oxygen. 

So the premise of the title is nonsense when referring to a ice-shelled watery moon. Life doesn't need oxygen in the atmosphere, everything it needs is there. Why is anyone trying to say otherwise for no apparent reason? That's sus.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/7/2024 at 5:39 PM, Nicolette said:

Also I threw out a random incorrect example.

Or, to put it more honestly, you were wrong.

 

On 3/7/2024 at 5:39 PM, Nicolette said:

 If you were wise enough to get past in instead of trying to prove me wrong

Don't worth about that. proving you wrong generally takes no effort at all, you tend to enter a battle of knowledge unarmed. Besides all I asked for was a source for your claim at which point YOU proved yourself wrong.

 

On 3/7/2024 at 5:39 PM, Nicolette said:

henneguya salminicola, that doesn't require oxygen

Well done, you obviously used google when trying to prove ME wrong. Unfortunately, as is your habit, you either didn't read it properly or understand it fully. Henneguya salminicola is an endoparasite that lives within fish. Whilst it has lost the ability for aerobic respiration it requires a host fish to live in. Notice the use of the term, "lost the ability for aerobic respiration". It probably evolved from cancerous cells in jelly fish and initially required oxygen before evolving away from it. Since it requires another species to live, which DOES require oxygen in it is, once again, irrelevant to the case at Europa, since if there is no oxygen there will be no fish for parasites to live in.

In fact there is quite a lot of life that doesn't require oxygen, a lot of bacteria undergo anaerobic respiration. However anaerobic respiration simply does not provide the necessary energy required by complex life, this is why there are very, VERY, few multicellular, anaerobic life forms (and even those are very simple like your endoparasite). This is just chemistry unfortunately and the reason why any kind of food change is likely to require O2 at some stage.

On 3/7/2024 at 5:39 PM, Nicolette said:

Life doesn't need oxygen in the atmosphere, everything it needs is there.

Aquatic life doesn't directly need oxygen in the atmosphere, it needs it in the water. If there is no source for that oxygen then there is no life. The problem is that on Europa, as on Earth, the main source of oxygen in that water is probably from the atmosphere. If there is insufficient oxygen in the atmosphere then there is insufficient in the water and no complex life.

On 3/7/2024 at 5:39 PM, Nicolette said:

Why is anyone trying to say otherwise for no apparent reason? That's sus.

Why do you always have to argue with every scientific statement when it is obvious to everyone (except you maybe) that you don't know whattr you are talking about. That's sus.

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