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What's the Difference Between US Army Rangers and Green Berets?


Grim Reaper 6

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Amazing specialization, both of them.  They have my sincere admiration and respect! 

While it would be great if our world didn't require their presence... I'm profoundly grateful they're here for us.

 

Reminds me of the reason I studied martial arts for decades; summed up in two sentences.

I'd rather be a warrior in a garden, than a gardener in a war.

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My cousin Dutchie was a green beret. Vietnam.

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1 minute ago, susieice said:

My cousin Dutchie was a green beret. Vietnam.

He was obvious a very brave guy, because that is one war I am glad I was too young for, I was 16 years old when Saigon fell in 1975. :yes:

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1 minute ago, Grim Reaper 6 said:

He was obvious a very brave guy, because that is one war I am glad I was too young for, I was 16 years old when Saigon fell in 1975. :yes:

I was just graduating high school. Dutchie was quite a bit older than me but I knew his sister really well. She told me he had a bit of a hard time acclimating back into civilian life after his discharge. PTS wasn't really understood yet back at that time.

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21 minutes ago, susieice said:

My cousin Dutchie was a green beret. Vietnam.

My great uncle Jack was a green beret during Nam...

I never got to meet him,he drank himself to death shortly after coming home.

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, CrimsonKing said:

My great uncle Jack was a green beret during Nam...

I never got to meet him,he drank himself to death shortly after coming home.

I'm so sorry Crimson. Vietnam was hard, even on vets I met that were regular army.

Dutchie would have actually been my second cousin. His dad and my dad were cousins. My older brother went to school with his brother Dennis and I went to school with his sister Darla. My brother and Dennis were 7 yrs older than I was and Dutchie was like 2 years older than Dennis. He must have been 26-27 yrs old when he came back. I know he did get married eventually and he owned a bar in my hometown. I haven't seen Darla in many years. We both got married and I moved out of state. She got married before I did. We just lost touch.

Edited by susieice
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2 minutes ago, susieice said:

I was just graduating high school. Dutchie was quite a bit older than me but I knew his sister really well. She told me he had a bit of a hard time acclimating back into civilian life after his discharge. PTS wasn't really understood yet back at that time.

Yea, I always had problems acclimating back life in the United States after a combat tour of duty. Yea it is a shame that PTSD wasn't really recognized as a mental health disorder until the mid-1980s. I was still on active duty when I was diagnosed with PTSD. I had not been in combat since 1993 in Somalia, then in March of 1989 I came home from work, and I could not sleep. This went on for approximately 6 days, so I finally went to the emergence room at Madigan Army Hospital at Ft. Lewis, Washington. They immediately admitted me to the hospital, and they brought in a psychiatrist who gave me a written test and mental evaluation, shortly later I was diagnosed with PTSD and placed on medication. Over the years with medication, I have most symptoms under control, except for sleep issues. But even with that said, there still times when i have really bad days, and I must just put one foot in front of the other and carry on!:yes:

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7 minutes ago, CrimsonKing said:

My great uncle Jack was a green beret during Nam...

I never got to meet him,he drank himself to death shortly after coming home.

That is certainly terrible, sadly far too many soldiers end up that way!!!:cry:

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Posted (edited)
51 minutes ago, quiXilver said:

Amazing specialization, both of them.  They have my sincere admiration and respect! 

While it would be great if our world didn't require their presence... I'm profoundly grateful they're here for us.

 

Reminds me of the reason I studied martial arts for decades; summed up in two sentences.

I'd rather be a warrior in a garden, than a gardener in a war.

Very Very well said thanks for your comments!!!!:tu: Because of my military MOS, I worked allot with JSOC - Special Operations soldiers. Our nations Special Operations soldiers sacrifice a great deal for our Nations safty and the JSOC soldiers I have worked with I can honestly are the best trained anywhere in the world!:yes:

Edited by Grim Reaper 6
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3 minutes ago, Grim Reaper 6 said:

Yea, I always had problems acclimating back life in the United States after a combat tour of duty. Yea it is a shame that PTSD wasn't really recognized as a mental health disorder until the mid-1980s. I was still on active duty when I was diagnosed with PTSD. I had not been in combat since 1993 in Somalia, then in March of 1989 I came home from work, and I could not sleep. This went on for approximately 6 days, so I finally went to the emergence room at Madigan Army Hospital at Ft. Lewis, Washington. They immediately admitted me to the hospital, and they brought in a psychiatrist who gave me a written test and mental evaluation, shortly later I was diagnosed with PTSD and placed on medication. Over the years with medication, I have most symptoms under control, except for sleep issues. But even with that said, there still times when i have really bad days, and I must just put one foot in front of the other and carry on!:yes:

I'm glad to hear they were able to treat you Grim. A lot of vets I met had a hard time forgetting what they saw over there and would have like temporary flashbacks but they never really talked about it. After I got married my ex and I lived in Maine and we met a really nice couple there. He was a Vietnam vet and he told us one night about a village they were going through. The Viet Cong had booby trapped a young boy around 7-8 yrs old who jumped down from a roof on his patrol. They had to shoot him and he never really got over that. This was in the early 80's. It must have been really hard over there.

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21 minutes ago, susieice said:

I'm glad to hear they were able to treat you Grim. A lot of vets I met had a hard time forgetting what they saw over there and would have like temporary flashbacks but they never really talked about it. After I got married my ex and I lived in Maine and we met a really nice couple there. He was a Vietnam vet and he told us one night about a village they were going through. The Viet Cong had booby trapped a young boy around 7-8 yrs old who jumped down from a roof on his patrol. They had to shoot him and he never really got over that. This was in the early 80's. It must have been really hard over there.

I still have similar problems; it depends upon the situation. One of the things that haunts me most were the deaths of civilians who were in the wrong place at the wrong time. Once you see somethings like that you can never unsee it and they kind of haunt me. But one thing I can say is that myself and my soldiers always placed the lives of civilians above anything else. And in this regard, we were as meticulous as was humanly possible under the circumstances, however mistakes still happen, and one must live with them.:cry:

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, CrimsonKing said:

My great uncle Jack was a green beret during Nam...

I never got to meet him,he drank himself to death shortly after coming home.

None of my family fought in Vietnam, my grandfather fought in WW2 and he passed away before I was born. We did have a family friend growing up who fought in Vietnam, unfortunately he spent 10 years in prison when he got home and found his wife shacked up with another man. The story as I heard it when I was a kid is that he came home, saw his wife, started beating on the man, the man attacked him with a weapon, our family friend disarmed him and killed him with it. 

10 years is probably deserved in the scheme of things, but no one should come home from war to find a loved one cheating on them. I haven't seen them in years, they used to babysit me when I was a kid and belonged to the same church/cult I did growing up in the 80s (the Worldwide Church of God Cult, if you know my story at all - haven't really posted about it outside the Spirituality forums, and haven't done that for a number of years now that I can recall - this article is describing the split after HWA's death and how they became more mainstream and evangelical, by this stage my parents left the church as part of the "large minority" who rebelled against what they saw as heresy and joined one of the dozens or hundreds of splinter groups such as the International Church of God and United Church of God - both of which my parents joined at some point). 

Edited by Paranoid Android
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59 minutes ago, Paranoid Android said:

None of my family fought in Vietnam, my grandfather fought in WW2 and he passed away before I was born. We did have a family friend growing up who fought in Vietnam, unfortunately he spent 10 years in prison when he got home and found his wife shacked up with another man. The story as I heard it when I was a kid is that he came home, saw his wife, started beating on the man, the man attacked him with a weapon, our family friend disarmed him and killed him with it. 

10 years is probably deserved in the scheme of things, but no one should come home from war to find a loved one cheating on them. I haven't seen them in years, they used to babysit me when I was a kid and belonged to the same church/cult I did growing up in the 80s (the Worldwide Church of God Cult, if you know my story at all - haven't really posted about it outside the Spirituality forums, and haven't done that for a number of years now that I can recall - this article is describing the split after HWA's death and how they became more mainstream and evangelical, by this stage my parents left the church as part of the "large minority" who rebelled against what they saw as heresy and joined one of the dozens or hundreds of splinter groups such as the International Church of God and United Church of God - both of which my parents joined at some point). 

Hey, my brother please stick to the topic of this thread as outline in the OP.

Thank you I really appreciate you for doing that!:yes:

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9 hours ago, Grim Reaper 6 said:

He was obvious a very brave guy, because that is one war I am glad I was too young for, I was 16 years old when Saigon fell in 1975. :yes:

You already know I was raised around all my stepfather's Vietnam vet pals. They had their own "club" and didn't mix too much with non vets. 

I heard it all since many were career and part of MACV-SOG which was made up of all branches. 

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Piney said:

You already know I was raised around all my stepfather's Vietnam vet pals. They had their own "club" and didn't mix too much with non vets. 

I heard it all since many were career and part of MACV-SOG which was made up of all branches. 

Piney, I bet you did hear it all because Military Assistance Command - Special Operations Group (MAC-SOG) was the true beginning that spawned the current Joint Special Operation Command (JSOC), so I am certain you had a very very good military education at a young age. :tu:

Edited by Grim Reaper 6
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18 minutes ago, Grim Reaper 6 said:

Piney, I bet you did hear it all because Military Assistance Command - Special Operations Group (MAC-SOG) was the true beginning that spawned the current Joint Special Operation Command (JSOC), so I am certain you had a very very good military education at a young age. :tu:

They taught me everything. 😬 

 

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1 minute ago, Piney said:

They taught me everything. 😬 

 

I certainly bet they did, and with all the other training you have received since then in my opinion you would really make one hell of a Special Operations Soldier.:tu:

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Just now, Grim Reaper 6 said:

I certainly bet they did, and with all the other training you have received since then in my opinion you would really make one hell of a Special Operations Soldier.:tu:

Except for the medical issues which kept me from the military.

Commander CMG knew what he hired though. Which is why he hired me.

The only thing I had to do with Corporate Measures was the Killing House and RTI-SERE. 

 

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11 hours ago, quiXilver said:

Reminds me of the reason I studied martial arts for decades; summed up in two sentences.

I'd rather be a warrior in a garden, than a gardener in a war.

That's one sentence.

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4 minutes ago, Tom1200 said:

That's one sentence.

Nit-picker. 😲

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Posted (edited)
58 minutes ago, Piney said:

Except for the medical issues which kept me from the military.

Commander CMG knew what he hired though. Which is why he hired me.

The only thing I had to do with Corporate Measures was the Killing House and RTI-SERE. 

 

Hey that's really a shame Piney, because seems that you certainly have what takes to gone very far.:yes:

Edited by Grim Reaper 6
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2 minutes ago, Piney said:

Nit-picker. 😲

Sorry, but it was my only contribution to this testosterone-fuelled thread!  Respect to the Rangers, the Green Berets, the Marines and all people who pledge to serve their country and fellow man.  But we've got the SBS and James Bond.

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17 minutes ago, Grim Reaper 6 said:

Hey that's really a shame Piney, because seems that you certainly have what takes to gone very far.:yes:

I wanted to be a medic and keep both sides happy.

16 minutes ago, Tom1200 said:

Sorry, but it was my only contribution to this testosterone-fuelled thread!  Respect to the Rangers, the Green Berets, the Marines and all people who pledge to serve their country and fellow man.  But we've got the SBS and James Bond.

I was the only field op for Corporate Measures that wasn't a Gurkha or ex SAS. 

So yeah.. I  know the British are tops and MI6 beats the CIA hands down. 

Now toss off you wispy, drippy Southerner! 

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