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Global Warming Is Slowing the Earth’s Rotation


OverSword

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As rising global temperatures melt Earth’s polar ice sheets, the shifting water is creating such a huge redistribution of our planet’s mass that its rotation speed is dropping. This unusual result of climate change is interacting with other forces that affect the planet’s rotational speed in ways that could ultimately even alter the way we keep time. In just a few years, we may have to make the first-ever deletion of a “leap second”—according to a new study published on Wednesday in Nature.

“This is another one of those ‘this has never happened before’ things that we’re seeing from global warming: the idea that this effect is large enough to change the rotation of the entire Earth,” says study co-author Duncan Agnew, a geophysicist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

 

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/global-warming-is-slowing-the-earths-rotation/

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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, OverSword said:

"I see the bad moon arisin"...

 

Edited by CrimsonKing
Autocorrect
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6 hours ago, CrimsonKing said:

"I see the bad moon arisin"...

I see trouble on the way
I see earthquakes and lightnin'
I see bad times today

:lol:

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13 hours ago, medes said:

I see trouble on the way
I see earthquakes and lightnin'
I see bad times today

:lol:

I actually thought this topic would have caught a lil bit more attention...

If one thinks about the changes globally in real time,every time a single degree increases in global temperatures...

The slowing down of  our rotation globally could be catastrophic... Unprecedented is the correct word.

There is a reason it is being seriously considered to add a Category 6 to the hurricane scale...some of these in strength and sheer size are becoming... Unprecedented.

Anyone here  have a better understanding of the potential impacts this could start causing?@Doc Socks Junior,@Charlez,@Piney and anyone else who has a better understanding than I.

Slowing down the earths rotation is fairly significant.

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12 hours ago, CrimsonKing said:

I actually thought this topic would have caught a lil bit more attention...

If one thinks about the changes globally in real time,every time a single degree increases in global temperatures...

The slowing down of  our rotation globally could be catastrophic... Unprecedented is the correct word.

There is a reason it is being seriously considered to add a Category 6 to the hurricane scale...some of these in strength and sheer size are becoming... Unprecedented.

Anyone here  have a better understanding of the potential impacts this could start causing?@Doc Socks Junior,@Charlez,@Piney and anyone else who has a better understanding than I.

Slowing down the earths rotation is fairly significant.

I think, actually, that the largest effects of this are in the man-made sphere. Think of precise time-keeping applications for satellites and such.

The length of day has been steadily increasing since basically the formation of the Earth-Moon system, as the latter moves away and tidally brakes us.

The interesting part to me is how this concerns our molten planetary core. Apparently, it has been decreasing in angular velocity since 1972. However, the angular velocity of the rest of earth (minus core) has been slowed by ice melt.

Quote

If polar ice melting had not recently accelerated, this problem would occur 3 years earlier: global warming is already affecting global timekeeping.

Thus, the leap second addition has been delayed by ice melt. If this continues, it could conceivably lead to removing a leap second. Apparently this is more difficult (?), i.e., it hasn't been done before.

For a lot of leap second jargon and explanation, check out this paper. It's somewhat helpful, but short and dense.

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0004-6256/136/5/1906

Really, I need to read the rest of the paper, but I'm being foiled currently by the pay wall. Will let you know the rest. It's pretty complicated.

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8 hours ago, Doc Socks Junior said:

I think, actually, that the largest effects of this are in the man-made sphere. Think of precise time-keeping applications for satellites and such.

The length of day has been steadily increasing since basically the formation of the Earth-Moon system, as the latter moves away and tidally brakes us.

The interesting part to me is how this concerns our molten planetary core. Apparently, it has been decreasing in angular velocity since 1972. However, the angular velocity of the rest of earth (minus core) has been slowed by ice melt.

Thus, the leap second addition has been delayed by ice melt. If this continues, it could conceivably lead to removing a leap second. Apparently this is more difficult (?), i.e., it hasn't been done before.

For a lot of leap second jargon and explanation, check out this paper. It's somewhat helpful, but short and dense.

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0004-6256/136/5/1906

Really, I need to read the rest of the paper, but I'm being foiled currently by the pay wall. Will let you know the rest. It's pretty complicated.

Thank you very much 👍 

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10 hours ago, Doc Socks Junior said:

For a lot of leap second jargon and explanation, check out this paper. It's somewhat helpful, but short and dense.

Agreed it is short and dense!

B)

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