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Spontaneous awakenings misdiagnosed as psychosis


Ajay0

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Posted (edited)


Interesting article from Psychology Today on how certain spontaneous awakenings of an energetic nature are being misdiagnosed as psychosis.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/out-the-darkness/201602/breakdowns-and-shift-ups?fbclid=IwAR0jXL_NLsUiPft2jKo_ayAaaSA0a97a0XQO9MqmoKsAL6u8Gw9pHPav1Qo
 

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In my research, I have found that sudden awakening in response to turmoil (or ‘transformation through turmoil’ as I sometimes call it) is far from uncommon. Unfortunately, however, it is often undetected or misinterpreted. This is because sometimes sudden awakening occurs in an intensely energetic and explosive form, and causes some psychological disturbances.

The shift sometimes creates a psychological earthquake which temporarily disrupts functions such as concentration, cognition, and memory. A person may find it difficult to think clearly or focus their attention, because their minds are overwhelmed with new impressions and thoughts and visions.

Edited by Saru
Trimmed for length - please avoid copying and pasting too much text.
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17 hours ago, Ell said:

The quote contains insufficient information to formulate a hypothesis.

The original quote as well did not have the necessary data. It was just meant as an appetizer.

You have to study the whole article to figure out the bigger picture on what it is all about.

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15 hours ago, XenoFish said:

Crazy people always looking for an excuse.

Well, lets hope that one fine day you don't get a spontaneous awakening and get confined to a psychiatric ward by psychiatrists insisting you are nuts in spite of your protests to the contrary. Half a century back, you might even get lobotomized as well to ensure that you remain a good, conforming and obedient citizen.

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1 hour ago, Ajay0 said:

The original quote as well did not have the necessary data. It was just meant as an appetizer.

You have to study the whole article to figure out the bigger picture on what it is all about.

I have now read some of the article; not all of it.

 

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 What might have appeared to be a breakdown is now revealed to be a shift-up, the birth of a latent higher-functioning self-system.

It is both. It is not psychosis. What is described is ascendancy, in which one or more of the (four) parts of the mind are lost, causing the remaining part(s) to function at a higher level: they become incarnations of gods. Such people in those respects are both respectively severely mentally handicapped and gifted.

 

It is devastating, especially if you do not know what has happened to you.

It happened to me as a child of nine years old due to being subjected to an extreme amount of stresshormone in a life threatening situation.

I now compare the loss of two parts of my mind to the loss of baby teeth. Afterwards arise the adult teeth. What was left of my mind became more mature and dominant than in ordinary persons.

My recommendation is to not medicate such ascended, evolved people. Treasure them instead.

There are different outcomes depending on which part(s) of the mind are lost. For example a natural slave born with a weak ego that never matured may ascend into an ascended slave when his or her ego is destroyed.

These ascendances are acquired psychologies.

 

In contrast with such acquired psychologies are similar innate psychologies in which people are born without some parts of the mind, for example: narcissists, psychopaths, sociopaths, people with Asperger's.

 

I twice in passing met someone who apparently lacked all parts of the mind, even worse than a psychopath. All that was present in their eyes was an utterly evil being. I quickly moved on when I saw them: I did not want to draw their attention to myself.

 

On the other hand there are also other mentally damaged people; people who are damaged in a bad way. It is necessary to differentiate between them and ascended people.

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3 hours ago, Ajay0 said:

Well, lets hope that one fine day you don't get a spontaneous awakening and get confined to a psychiatric ward by psychiatrists insisting you are nuts in spite of your protests to the contrary. Half a century back, you might even get lobotomized as well to ensure that you remain a good, conforming and obedient citizen.

Some people need to be lobotomized.

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7 minutes ago, XenoFish said:

Some people need to be lobotomized.

Lobotomy is banned in India as there are more effective alternatives. 

The last known lobotomy in the US occurred in 1967, which resulted in the patient's death. Today, lobotomies remain legal in the US, but regulations vary across states.

John F. Kennedy's sister Rosemary Kennedy   in her early young adult years,  had experienced seizures and violent mood swings. In response to these issues, her father arranged a prefrontal lobotomy on her in 1941 when she was 23 years of age; the procedure left her permanently incapacitated and rendered her unable to speak intelligibly.

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I suspect we need to clarify the terms being used here Ajay0.

This awakening...  The Japanese use the term Satori, and the Chinese use the term Wu, while I believe the favored term in India is anuttara-samyak-sambodhi.

It is an inexpressible experience which supposedly suspends linguistic processing, which does sound like an episode of mental illness, but comes with a substantive and potentially beneficial change in "personal" perspective from a psychiatric point of view.  It often leads to some very odd behavior, and the episode is not true or "deep" enlightenment, and you can find the state suspended if your conditions change and you find yourself again "in your box".

The fact is, spontaneous enlightenment is very rare, or else every heroin addict could be claiming spontaneous enlightenment.  Most people wouldn't know what Satori was if it happened to them. 

The fact is, prolonged meditation can release the same brain chemistry that is triggered when a person is injected with opioids, and the effect can seem remarkably profound, but it may actually be a breakdown in the brain's ability to regulate these chemicals, which is technically a mental illness, even though primitive societies regarded what is effectively a prolonged chemical imbalance in the brain as a profound spiritual state. 

So how do we know the separation between brain damage and enlightenment?

I personally turn to the Avitamsaka Sutra, using the Ten Wisdom Powers as proof of enlightenment.  The theory being that you know a tree by its fruit.

Consider that I have studied this topic and meditate frequently, but also remain skeptical of what may well be delusion.  Without the foundation of science, simply copying the spiritual practices of the pre-scientific people may actually be making us ill.  Consider how detrimental meditation is to schizophrenics, as an example. 

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Posted (edited)
On 4/13/2024 at 9:33 PM, Alchopwn said:

I suspect we need to clarify the terms being used here Ajay0.

This awakening...  The Japanese use the term Satori, and the Chinese use the term Wu, while I believe the favored term in India is anuttara-samyak-sambodhi.

 


The right term in eastern psychology is samadhi, not Anuttara-samyak-sambodhi which means perfect enlightenment of a Buddha. 

Samadhi can come and go and it is nirvikalpa samadhi that is of a permanent nature. 

Satori, Wu, Wajd (sufism), samadhi are terms in ancient eastern psychology that can be used to correspond to the term 'awakening' as described in the article.

Eastern psychological techniques like vipassana and mindfulness have been incorporated into modern psychiatry and psychology as tools for mental health in the late twentieth century.

However, if you read the article there is no description of eastern psychology or corresponding terminology there. 

The article is written by a western psychologist and academician on a western psychological context recognizing 'awakenings' as a genuine phenomenon and not psychosis, and I placed this article over here for this reason alone.

Edited by Ajay0
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31 minutes ago, Ajay0 said:


The right term in eastern psychology is samadhi

LOL, of course it is.  It was on the tip of my tongue.  SMH.  This is what happens when I don't speak languages often enough.  I forget my vocab.

37 minutes ago, Ajay0 said:

Eastern psychological techniques like vipassana and mindfulness have been incorporated into modern psychiatry and psychology as tools for mental health in the late twentieth century.

Agreed.  I worked as a psych counsellor, and I personally wouldn't meditate if I thought it was a waste of time.  These practices work, but a good skeptic will always want to understand why they work.

43 minutes ago, Ajay0 said:

The article is written by a western psychologist and academician on a western psychological context recognizing 'awakenings' as a genuine phenomenon and not psychosis, and I placed this article over here for this reason alone.

 The problem as I see it is, given the subjective nature of the experience, how do you tell when someone religiously minded is misidentifying a psychotic break as samadhi or worse, as perfect enlightenment?  The mentally ill can become very grandiose and make wild claims, after all.  So how do we differentiate the mentally ill from the genuinely enlightened?  I personally would like to be able to put them in an fMRI machine and point to consistent brain activity to differentiate the states, but failing that, I turn to the Avitamsaka Sutra for symptoms of enlightenment.

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An another informative article on spontaneous awakenings by psychologist Jessica Corneille.

https://therapytips.org/interviews/what-happens-when-you-have-a-spontaneous-spiritual-experience

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In contrast, these experiences are typically pathologized by default within mainstream clinical settings, due to their overlaps with the symptoms of certain psychopathologies, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia – a presumption exacerbated by a lack of scientific data on SSAs, their characteristics, well-being implications, and general occurrence within widespread populations.

While there may occasionally be similarities between both sets of experiences, both anecdotal and existing scientific evidence suggest that these experiences can occur independently, void of the presence of a mental health disorder, and often lead to significant improvements in mental and physical well-being, enhanced pro-social and pro-environmental behaviors, and decreased risks of developing psychopathological tendencies.

 

 

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I hunted animals all my life, it's what I did but one day not long ago I lost all desire to do this instantly. I'm not anti hunting but I now will carry spiders out of the house, can't kill a chicken for dinner and feel bad for stepping on an ant. Is this an example about the post?

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1 hour ago, openozy said:

I hunted animals all my life, it's what I did but one day not long ago I lost all desire to do this instantly. I'm not anti hunting but I now will carry spiders out of the house, can't kill a chicken for dinner and feel bad for stepping on an ant. Is this an example about the post?

No. It appears to indicate some psychological change or growth, though. You would have known if part of your mind had died.

It is difficult to tell without further information.

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On 4/13/2024 at 12:54 AM, Ajay0 said:

Well, lets hope that one fine day you don't get a spontaneous awakening and get confined to a psychiatric ward by psychiatrists insisting you are nuts in spite of your protests to the contrary. Half a century back, you might even get lobotomized as well to ensure that you remain a good, conforming and obedient citizen.

And sometimes the person was simply crazy

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On 4/17/2024 at 3:45 AM, openozy said:

I hunted animals all my life, it's what I did but one day not long ago I lost all desire to do this instantly. I'm not anti hunting but I now will carry spiders out of the house, can't kill a chicken for dinner and feel bad for stepping on an ant. Is this an example about the post?

Very interesting, Peter burn a big game hunter had this type epiphany and refused to hunt saying little more about it than he no longer wanted to kill beautiful creatures.

I take bugs outside have for years.

I have seen many heart warming cases of this I have no idea the cause but I really do like it.

 

My takeaway from the OP is trying to point out every unusual thing that a person might do and have labeled "mental illness" isn't such, well, you might noticed when I post about my OCD, Panic , drdp etc i do call it mental issues i dont use illness as I am not looking to be treated,

A person having a complete mental breakdown really deserves treatment to avoid them hurting themselves or others

 

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On 4/12/2024 at 12:44 PM, Ajay0 said:


Interesting article from Psychology Today on how certain spontaneous awakenings of an energetic nature are being misdiagnosed as psychosis.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/out-the-darkness/201602/breakdowns-and-shift-ups?fbclid=IwAR0jXL_NLsUiPft2jKo_ayAaaSA0a97a0XQO9MqmoKsAL6u8Gw9pHPav1Qo
 

We've talked about it a lot on a different forum years ago, we referred to it as Kundalini (like that but different) the official description fits to a t:

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A sudden urge for incredible change, seeing through misperceptions or delusions of the past. A profound acceptance of what is and seeing the truth or reality for what it is, no longer arguing with reality. Recognition of oneness with the desire to serve others altruistically. Deep compassion for all of life.

source, didn't vet them they said what was in the direction of what I was remembering

so yeah that is the state of affairs, to awaken to your true pure self is in this world of Moloch 'illness'

 

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