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Ancient Bronze Plaque Depicting Alexander the Great Discovered in Danish Field


Grim Reaper 6

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In a small field near Ringsted, Denmark, a discovery of monumental historical significance has emerged from beneath the earth’s surface. Two amateur archaeologists, Finn Ibsen and Lars Danielsen, stumbled upon a corroded bronze plaque while using metal detectors in their search for artifacts. Little did they know, they were about to unearth a relic dating back to the ancient world.

The plaque, measuring a mere 26-28 mm in diameter, bears the likeness of Alexander the Great, the legendary conqueror who ruled over vast territories from Greece to India in the fourth century BC. This find has had widespread intrigue and excitement among historians and archaeologists.

Ancient Bronze Plaque Depicting Alexander the Great Discovered in Danish Field (msn.com)

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Posted (edited)

Weird, in that Alexander went the other way toward India. Likely someone brought it back at some point.

Ive got a metal detector, and usually they cant detect stuff down too deep. Even a large coin sized piece like this would beep only if its less than six inches down.

Which in many parts of the world means buried like 100 to 200 years ago.

Of course, i dont know how deep it was, or how powerful their detectors are, but in general, it seems, IMHO, like probably brought/dropped there between Napoleon and WW1.

Edited by DieChecker
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3 hours ago, DieChecker said:

Weird, in that Alexander went the other way toward India. Likely someone brought it back at some point.

Ive got a metal detector, and usually they cant detect stuff down too deep. Even a large coin sized piece like this would beep only if its less than six inches down.

Which in many parts of the world means buried like 100 to 200 years ago.

Of course, i dont know how deep it was, or how powerful their detectors are, but in general, it seems, IMHO, like probably brought/dropped there between Napoleon and WW1.

Vikings traded extensively and served as mercenaries with the Arab and Greek/Byzantium world. So this trinket isn't that big of a surprise.

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5 hours ago, DieChecker said:

Ive got a metal detector, and usually they cant detect stuff down too deep. Even a large coin sized piece like this would beep only if its less than six inches down.

iirc They can detect things roughly half as deep as the coil is wide.

https://www.minelab.com/community/treasure-talk/a-crash-course-in-everything-coils#:~:text=For gold detecting%2C generally you,nuggets close to the surface.&text=Coil shape can be an important factor.

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18 hours ago, Piney said:

Vikings traded extensively and served as mercenaries with the Arab and Greek/Byzantium world. So this trinket isn't that big of a surprise.

Yeah. I remember reading a lot went and served as the Byzantine Emperor's bodyguards, or elite infantry. Travel down through proto-Russia. Got paid a ton, and ended up carrying a lot of the riches home.

👍

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, and-then said:

The guys in the article look like theyre using a 8 inch coil. Or maybe a 20 cm coil. So would detect like 4 inched down. Which would still, roughly, IMHO, be like dropped 150 years ago.

Edited by DieChecker
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