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Indian scientists develops sustainable hydrogel that removes microplastics from water


Ajay0

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Indian researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) have designed a sustainable hydrogel to remove  microplastics from water.
 

https://www.deccanherald.com/science/iisc-bengaluru-develops-sustainable-hydrogel-that-removes-microplastics-from-water-2975465

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Microplastics – tiny plastic debris that can enter our bodies through the water we drink and expose us to illnesses – have also been marked for their adverse impact on the environment. Filtering membranes have had limited results because the membranes can become clogged with these tiny particles, rendering them unsustainable. An IISc team led by Suryasarathi Bose, Professor at the Department of Materials Engineering, turned to 3D hydrogels for a solution. The material has an intertwined polymer network that can bind the contaminants and degrade them using UV light irradiation, IISc said.

The team crushed food container lids and other daily-use plastic products to create two of the most common microplastics: polyvinyl chloride and polypropylene. The hydrogel could remove about 95 per cent and 93 per cent of the two different types of of microplastics in water at near-neutral pH (∼6.5). Tests also validated the material’s durability.
 


 

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That's great.  I wonder how much it costs, what the byproducts are, and what waste it produces?

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Sounds like it might be a good process for drinking water supplies?  ..but can the process remove micro plastics from lakes ,rivers, &oceans?  And now..even our AIR!    I hope/wish there is a way to do so.

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22 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

That's great.  I wonder how much it costs, what the byproducts are, and what waste it produces?

As per the article, the hydrogel could last for up to five cycles of microplastic removal without significant loss of efficacy. Once it has outlived its use, the hydrogel could be repurposed into carbon nanomaterials for removing heavy metals like hexavalent chromium from polluted water.

It is a recent innovation that has not reached production mode, so costs are not easy to determine.

 

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16 hours ago, lightly said:

Sounds like it might be a good process for drinking water supplies?  ..but can the process remove micro plastics from lakes ,rivers, &oceans?  And now..even our AIR!    I hope/wish there is a way to do so.

Yes, the researchers are planning to work with collaborators to develop a device that can help clean up microplastics from various water sources on a large scale.

 

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22 hours ago, Ajay0 said:

As per the article, the hydrogel could last for up to five cycles of microplastic removal without significant loss of efficacy. Once it has outlived its use, the hydrogel could be repurposed into carbon nanomaterials for removing heavy metals like hexavalent chromium from polluted water.

It is a recent innovation that has not reached production mode, so costs are not easy to determine.

 

So what happens to the microplastics in this process?

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