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Sun Releases Strong Flares - Geomagnetic storms to hit Earth [merged and updated]


Waspie_Dwarf

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Sun Releases Three Strong Flares

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The Sun emitted three strong solar flares. The first flare peaked at 2:01 A.M. ET on May 5, 2024, and the second peaked at 7:54 A.M. ET on May 5, 2024. The third peaked at 2:35 A.M. ET on May 6, 2024. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured an image of the event.

image.gif.7bbf1cbaca0f6e4f8102ca550871aabd.gif

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured these images of the solar flares — as seen in the bright flashes in the upper right — on May 5 and May 6, 2024. The image shows a subset of extreme ultraviolet light that highlights the extremely hot material in flares and which is colorized in teal. Credit: NASA/SDO

Read More: ➡️ NASA

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  • The title was changed to Sun Releases Strong Flares [updated]

Sun Releases 2 Strong Flares

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The Sun emitted two strong solar flares, the first peaking at 9:41 p.m. ET on May 7, 2024, and the second peaking at 1:09 a.m. ET on May 8, 2024. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured images of the events.

May-7-8-2024-SDO-131-Dual-Active-Regions

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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Sun Releases 2 Strong Solar Flares

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The Sun emitted two strong solar flares, peaking at 5:40 p.m. ET on May 8, 2024, and 5:13 a.m. ET on May 9, 2024. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured images of the events.

image.thumb.jpeg.39b480c39174588a9309fcd93c0c5bab.jpeg

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured these images of the solar flares – as seen in the bright flash in the lower right – on May 8, 2024 (left) and May 9, 2024 (right). The images show a subset of extreme ultraviolet light that highlights the extremely hot material in flares. The left image is colorized in teal and the right image is colorized in red. Credit: NASA/SDO

Solar flares are powerful bursts of energy. Flares and solar eruptions can impact radio communications, electric power grids, navigation signals, and pose risks to spacecraft and astronauts.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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SWPC Issues Its First G4 Watch Since 2005 | NOAA / NWS Space Weather Prediction Center

On Thursday, May 9, 2024, the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center issued a Severe (G4) Geomagnetic Storm Watch. At least five earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed and expected to arrive as early as midday Friday, May 10, 2024, and persist through Sunday, May 12, 2024. Several strong flares have been observed over the past few days and were associated with a large and magnetically complex sunspot cluster (NOAA region 3664), which is 16 times the diameter of Earth.

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The northern lights are going to be spectacular this weekend. 

Northern lights this weekend? Auroras could be visible as far south as Alabama. (msn.com)

Skywatchers get ready: Thanks to heightened solar activity, the aurora borealis could be coming to the skies above a large portion of the United States this weekend, space weather forecasters said Thursday.

Federal forecasters from NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center said that during previous solar activity of this magnitude, the "aurora has been seen as low as Alabama and northern California." Experts say the aurora might be visible Friday, Saturday or Sunday nights.

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Strong Solar Flare Erupts from Sun

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The Sun emitted a strong solar flare, peaking at 1:44 p.m. ET on May 9, 2024. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured an image of the event.

f_094_335_193_1024.thumb.webp.fb20bec9b124f2b8647d9a92b885881e.webp

Solar flares are powerful bursts of energy. Flares and solar eruptions can impact radio communications, electric power grids, navigation signals, and pose risks to spacecraft and astronauts.

This flare is classified as an X1.1 flare. X-class denotes the most intense flares, while the number provides more information about its strength.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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I will definitely be watching!

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Strong Solar Flare Erupts from Sun

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The Sun emitted a strong solar flare, peaking at 2:54 a.m. ET on May 10, 2024. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured an image of the event.

SDO-X3pt9-Flare-May-10-2024-131-171-crop.thumb.webp.a6d10d30768df815e8887ba687042848.webp

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of a solar flare – as seen in the bright flash toward the middle of the image – on May 10, 2024. The image shows a subset of extreme ultraviolet light that highlights the extremely hot material in flares and which is colorized in gold. Credit: NASA/SDO

Solar flares are powerful bursts of energy. Flares and solar eruptions can impact radio communications, electric power grids, navigation signals, and pose risks to spacecraft and astronauts.

This flare is classified as an X3.9 flare. X-class denotes the most intense flares, while the number provides more information about its strength.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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Friday night it was upgraded to a G5. 

Radiation from this activity began to hit the earth’s magnetic field on Friday and will last through the weekend, said the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). On Friday evening, NOAA upgraded the storm to G5 or “extreme,” marking the first such event since October 2003.

NOAA’s warning of extreme space weather suggests the storm could trigger numerous effects for life on earth, possibly affecting the power grid as well as satellite and high frequency radio communications. Here’s what that means for technology users.

Since GPS satellites depend on signals penetrating the ionosphere, the geomagnetic disturbance scientists are expecting could affect that critical technology used by planes, ocean-going vessels, and in the agriculture and oil and gas industries. And it could affect shortwave radio transmissions used by ships and aircraft, emergency management agencies, the military and even ham radio operators, all of whom rely on the high frequency radio airwaves that NOAA says could be scattered by the storm.

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Posted (edited)

Pictures of the auroras. It's still cloudy and rainy here so I really can't see the sky. NOAA has upgraded the storm to a G5.

Thrilled Britons capture stunning images of Northern Lights over UK – latest news (telegraph.co.uk)

Edited by susieice
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  • The title was changed to Sun Releases Strong Flares - Geomagnetic storms to hit Earth [merged and updated]

I've seen pictures posted online from Florida and Texas. I hope everyone who can goes out to see this. It's beautiful!

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Iowa, Oklahoma and a lot of Canada is posting in. It seems the more northern states are seeing green while the southern ones are pink. Maybe Waspie can tell us why. I'd post some pictures but it's a private weather site so I'll wait and see if a group of photos are released somewhere online.

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We were under an umbrella of streams converging together.  It was amazing

nl2.jpg

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It is amazing. 360 degrees of curtains of light. Like being in a planetarium dome but much, much vaster. Reds, greens, purples, blues. I'm still in awe.

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I went to bed just before it started ......  fortunately woke later to just catch the very end, but missed the best.  First time I've seen the aurora in England though (seen it before in Scotland) - very unusual for it to be naked eye visible this far south.

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Supposed to be more tonight, heading back out 

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Posted (edited)

Yes. Reports are saying tonight will be a repeat. It's going to rain here tonight also. Figures. Some sites are starting to say the solar storm will still be strong Sunday night.

‘Extreme’ geomagnetic storms return Saturday promising encore of nationwide auroras | Fox Weather

When will Northern Lights be visible in Illinois? Chicago has 2nd chance at light show on Saturday due to severe solar storm - ABC7 Chicago

slideshow in this link.

The northern lights danced across the US last night. It could happen again Saturday. (msn.com)

Edited by susieice
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Sun Releases 2 Strong Flares

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The Sun emitted two strong solar flares, peaking at 9:23 p.m. ET on May 10, 2024, and 7:44 a.m. ET on May 11, 2024. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured an image of the event.

May-11-side-by-side-EDT.thumb.webp.355925a8acf85e9505b45c3c188fa181.webpNASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the two solar flares on May 10 and May 11, 2024. The image shows a subset of extreme ultraviolet light that highlights the extremely hot material in flares created from a mixture of SDO’s AIA 193, 171 and 131 channels. Credit: NASA/SDO

Solar flares are powerful bursts of energy. Flares and solar eruptions can impact radio communications, electric power grids, navigation signals, and pose risks to spacecraft and astronauts.

The flares are classified as X5.8 and X1.5-class flares, respectively. X-class denotes the most intense flares, while the number provides more information about its strength.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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By a lucky coincidence I was in Scotland at the weekend and the display there started about 11pm. It was directly overhead with radial filaments radiating in all directions, although the colours were muted.

Interestingly, once back home, I have been told of telecom/broadband outages and power cuts in the area, phones did not come back on until Monday morning. Some shops closed without the ability to take credit cards.

Scotland was apparently unaffected?  

Edited by L.A.T.1961
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Sun Releases 2 Strong Solar Flares

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The Sun emitted two strong solar flares, the first peaking at 10:09 p.m. ET on May 13, 2024, and the second peaking at 8:55 a.m. ET on May 14, 2024. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured images of the event.

May-14-side-by-side.thumb.webp.05e2fd6ab7158016d9cd0e3d96674afa.webp

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured these images of the solar flares – as seen in the bright flash on the right sides of the images – on May 13 and May 14, 2024. These images show a subset of extreme ultraviolet light that highlights the extremely hot material in flares and which is colorized in purple, pink, and gold. Credit: NASA/SDO

Solar flares are powerful bursts of energy. Flares and solar eruptions can impact radio communications, electric power grids, navigation signals, and pose risks to spacecraft and astronauts.

The first flare is classified as an X1.7 class flare and the second flare is classified as an X1.2 class flare. X-class denotes the most intense flares, while the number provides more information about its strength.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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