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dark areas of the moon


Alex_Rogan

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Okay. This is probably a dumb series of questions.

You know how there are dark areas on the face of the moon, especially apparent on a full moon. Splotches that appear to be a face to some. "Can you see the Man on the Moon?" 

I hope some people can shed some light on this recent curiousity of mine.

Do the dark patterns change throughout the year?

Is it different from different hemispheres or vantage points?

Is it darker because the surface of moon geology is darker in some areas.

Are the large darker areas just craters or vast depressions?

Does the moon reflect sunlight directly? Does it reflect earthshine - sun reflecting off the earth onto the moon? A combination of both? What exactly illuminates the moon?

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The dark areas are maria and are ancient basalt flows from previous impacts. 

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20 minutes ago, Occupational Hubris said:

The dark areas are maria and are ancient basalt flows from previous impacts. 

so it is the mineral geology that makes the darker area patterns?

 

I seem to recall stories from my grandfather, who was of the Farmers Almanac era, that omens of a sort could be interpreted from the dark patterns on the face of the moon. Sometimes a man's face, sometimes a rabbit, sometimes other things - each timed out for good hunts or harvest, etc. 

Maybe I'm remembering it wrong.

There are certainly overwhelming aspects of superstition and pareidolia. 

Does the pattern change throughout the year? from different vantage points?

If the darker areas (less reflective) are differences of mineral geology of the surface, why does it seem to chsnge.... which leads me to wonder exactly how the moon is illuminated.

 

(I'm not trying to lead this series of questions into a predetermined personal conclusion. I'm honestly curious about it and open to any insight with gratitude.)

 

 

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The moon just reflects sunlight as it orbits...

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Posted (edited)
44 minutes ago, Occupational Hubris said:

from previous impacts. 

I'm also curious about impact craters. 

Did the moon once rotate? If so, why did it stop?

If the craters facing the earth were from impacts, then it must have rotated at some point?

Has an impact on the earth-facing moon ever happened? Seems impossible. 

I have a quiet theory that they are not impact craters, but more like volcanic craters of escaping gasses erupting as it formed and compressed.

I honestly don't have any education on the subject. Just curiosity and wonderment.

Edited by Alex_Rogan
the to then
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The moon still rotates. It completes one full rotation per orbit, since it is tidally locked. 

There are still impacts. You can see lots of video of these on youtube

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7 minutes ago, Occupational Hubris said:

The moon still rotates. It completes one full rotation per orbit, since it is tidally locked. 

There are still impacts. You can see lots of video of these on youtube

nice. thank you.

I'm gonna try to search for some vids. 

I understand that the moon rotates just enough to keep one side facing the earth at all times....but it still baffles me to think that there could ever be an earth-facing impact on the moon. 

I know I'm getting off topic on a thread I started. lol. There are still so many mysteries about the nature of the moon for me.

 

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8 minutes ago, Alex_Rogan said:

nice. thank you.

I'm gonna try to search for some vids. 

I understand that the moon rotates just enough to keep one side facing the earth at all times....but it still baffles me to think that there could ever be an earth-facing impact on the moon. 

I know I'm getting off topic on a thread I started. lol. There are still so many mysteries about the nature of the moon for me.

 

https://science.nasa.gov/moon/

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this seems unnatural, from a gut instinct point of view. I don't get the trajectory path that led the impact.

it's just the first video I found. I'm trying to wrap my mind around it.

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Posted (edited)

that video must have been bunk. looks like there are several others that seem just as fake. It's so hard to pursue truths in this age of deception. 

How are we ever going to get a good view of real truth/fact when there are so many having "fun" with information pollution? 

result of overall entropy, I suppose.

 

Still, part of my original question: does the appearance of the dark areas on the face of the moon vary throughout the year and from viewpoints?

Edited by Alex_Rogan
everytime I make a typo it makes me feel like I disapointed every Language Arts teacher who cared about teaching. Even one incorrect letter in a word makes me cringe. errrrr. nevermind the sentence structure and grammar.
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25 minutes ago, Alex_Rogan said:

this seems unnatural, from a gut instinct point of view. I don't get the trajectory path that led the impact.

it's just the first video I found. I'm trying to wrap my mind around it.

Use reputable sources

 

https://www.nasa.gov/meteoroid-environment-office/lunar-impact-monitoring/videos/

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Dark areas of the moon?  Did the light flee to the suburban areas of the moon to avoid assumed falling property prices?  Everything is so politically charged these days. 🙄

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