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Watch the Skies - June's Night Sky Notes [updated]


Waspie_Dwarf

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June’s Night Sky Notes: Constant Companions: Circumpolar Constellations, Part III

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by Kat Troche of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific

 

In our final installment of the stars around the North Star, we look ahead to the summer months, where depending on your latitude, the items in these circumpolar constellations are nice and high. Today, we’ll discuss Cepheus, Draco, and Ursa Major. These objects can all be spotted with a medium to large-sized telescope under dark skies.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

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I do love the stars and constellations…..lived half my life in the northern hemisphere and got to know them quite well moved to the southern hemisphere and it all changed …..th a certain extent…..

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I uses yo lay out on the garage roof with binoculars to watch the sky when I was a teenager.  We lived in the boonies, so it was dark, no light polution. I wish I could do that now

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  • The title was changed to Watch the Skies - June's Night Sky Notes [updated]

The Next Full Moon is the Strawberry Moon

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The Next Full Moon is the Strawberry Moon; the Flower, Hot, Hoe, or Planting Moon; the Mead or Honey Moon; the Rose Moon; Vat Purnima; Poson Poya; and the LRO Moon.

The next full Moon will be Friday evening, June 21, 2024, appearing opposite the Sun (in Earth-based longitude) at 9:08 PM EDT. This will be Saturday from Greenland and Cape Verde time eastward across Eurasia, Africa, and Australia to the International Date Line in the mid-Pacific. Most commercial calendars will show this full Moon on Saturday, June 22, the date in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The Moon will appear full for about three days around this time, from Thursday evening through Sunday morning.

Read More: ➡️ NASA

 

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On 6/17/2024 at 4:39 PM, Waspie_Dwarf said:

 

That is cool, thank you

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