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Lost Continents: The Atlantis Theme in History, Science, and Literature


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Required reading.
You'll need to join the internet archive to see the text though.
Just give them your email FFS. They're going broke.

Odd, but I think Chapter 9 is the place to start.
https://archive.org/details/lostcontinentsat0000lspr_z4z4/page/206/mode/2up?view=theater

Harte

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I had a Dover reprint of this when I was a teenager. Still a good read today.

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Posted (edited)

Reviewer Groff Conklin described the original edition as "a monument of scholarship [and] a richly documented and entertaining survey of how crazy the crackpots can get."[3] Boucher and McComas praised it as "a marvelously and terrifying history of the human will-to-believe, even in the face of all factual evidence.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_Continents

De Camp's work is still one of the most reliable sources on the lost continent theme. Lost continents or ancient civilizations sunk by a deluge are a common theme in the scriptures of doctrines of many modern pseudoreligions or cults. Well-known instances include James Churchward's books on Mu, the Theosophical portrayals of Hyperborea, Lemuria and Atlantis, and even the Nazimythologizing about Thule. As authors of these materials tend not to state (or do mis-state) their sources, works like that of de Camp are quite useful to anyone interested in objective information.

People like him who devote tomes of books on such topics, even fiction just blow me away x

 

IMG_1800.jpeg

Edited by The Puzzler
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A very talented writer of Science Fiction as well. One of the greats from The Golden Age of the genre. Easily on par with Azimov, Bradbury and Heinlein.

Harte

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Well, maybe not Bradbury, who might be the greatest writer that ever lived.

Harte

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26 minutes ago, Harte said:

Well, maybe not Bradbury, who might be the greatest writer that ever lived.

Harte

The Martian Chronicles is one of my all time favorite works.

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40 minutes ago, Harte said:

Well, maybe not Bradbury, who might be the greatest writer that ever lived.

Harte

Herbert, Asimov then Bradbury are my top three.

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5 hours ago, Antigonos said:

The Martian Chronicles is one of my all time favorite works.

The first one I read.
I was in grammar school. They used to hand out flyers for cheap paperbacks to the kids. Most of them were a dollar or less to order.
Those short stories blew my mind and made me a lifelong fanatic.

Harte

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Posted (edited)
On 6/4/2024 at 5:15 PM, Harte said:

Required reading.
You'll need to join the internet archive to see the text though.
Just give them your email FFS. They're going broke.

Odd, but I think Chapter 9 is the place to start.
https://archive.org/details/lostcontinentsat0000lspr_z4z4/page/206/mode/2up?view=theater

Harte

Sprague (and Catherine... I knew them both from conventions -- they were local here to Dallas, so we crossed paths at many regional conventions) was an engineer with a remarkable ability to explain things and to research subjects.  Very charming in person and could hold forth on a lot of fascinating topics.

Edited by Kenemet
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On 6/5/2024 at 10:00 AM, The Puzzler said:

Reviewer Groff Conklin described the original edition as "a monument of scholarship [and] a richly documented and entertaining survey of how crazy the crackpots can get."[3] Boucher and McComas praised it as "a marvelously and terrifying history of the human will-to-believe, even in the face of all factual evidence.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_Continents

De Camp's work is still one of the most reliable sources on the lost continent theme. Lost continents or ancient civilizations sunk by a deluge are a common theme in the scriptures of doctrines of many modern pseudoreligions or cults. Well-known instances include James Churchward's books on Mu, the Theosophical portrayals of Hyperborea, Lemuria and Atlantis, and even the Nazimythologizing about Thule. As authors of these materials tend not to state (or do mis-state) their sources, works like that of de Camp are quite useful to anyone interested in objective information.

People like him who devote tomes of books on such topics, even fiction just blow me away x

 

IMG_1800.jpeg

My friend Lynn Abbey told me a little story about Gordon Dickson and his description of the types of writers:  "There's two types of writers," he said.  "Those you can't help and those you can't stop."

Sprague was one of those you couldn't stop.

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6 hours ago, Kenemet said:

Sprague (and Catherine... I knew them both from conventions -- they were local here to Dallas, so we crossed paths at many regional conventions) was an engineer with a remarkable ability to explain things and to research subjects.  Very charming in person and could hold forth on a lot of fascinating topics.

He wrote the first biography of Lovecraft that I ever read. 

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On 6/4/2024 at 3:15 PM, Harte said:

Required reading.
You'll need to join the internet archive to see the text though.
Just give them your email FFS. They're going broke.

Odd, but I think Chapter 9 is the place to start.
https://archive.org/details/lostcontinentsat0000lspr_z4z4/page/206/mode/2up?view=theater

Harte

Yep a classic, had visited there for some time

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22 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

Yep a classic, had visited there for some time

Good seeing you, Hans.

Harte

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20 hours ago, Hanslune said:

Yep a classic, had visited there for some time

And the Colonel Henry Blake of Archaeologists has returned.

😛

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6 hours ago, Piney said:

And the Colonel Henry Blake of Archaeologists has returned.

😛

Thank you Klinger!

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On 6/10/2024 at 6:31 PM, Harte said:

Good seeing you, Hans.

Harte

Howdy, short stop, I only have 2-3 hours when I can escape the guards for the day.

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