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How did a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way come to be?


Waspie_Dwarf

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How did a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way come to be?

A UC Riverside-led team of physicists offers an explanation

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Crater 2, located approximately 380,000 light years from Earth, is one of the largest satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Extremely cold and with slow-moving stars, Crater 2 has low surface brightness. How this galaxy originated remains unclear.

“Since its discovery in 2016, there have been many attempts to reproduce Crater 2’s unusual properties, but it has proved very challenging,” said Hai-Bo Yu, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of California, Riverside, whose team now offers an explanation for Crater 2’s origin in a paper published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Read More: ➡️ University of California, Riverside

 

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 largest satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Extremely cold and with slow-moving stars, Crater 2 has low surface brightness.

I surmise that these are 'Crater 2’s unusual properties'?

 

Can it be that this satellite galaxy is tidally locked to the Milky Way?

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19 minutes ago, Ell said:

Can it be that this satellite galaxy is tidally locked to the Milky Way?

What exactly do you mean by "tidally locked", and why do you think it is relevant and related to low surface brightness?

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Crater 2 is large and its stars move slowly. That may imply that the law of conservation of momentum is involved: Being tidally locked, would require the galaxy to have expanded its diameter, causing its stars to move far more slowly. Like the tidally locked Moon apparently not rotating.

The less rotation -> the less heat -> the less brightness. Like the Moon is cold.

It is just a hypothesis. The article has barely twenty words of relevant information - and that is a rather inadequate number.

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7 minutes ago, Ell said:

It is just a hypothesis.

It's a case of you thinking you know more than you actually do AGAIN.

The reason I asked the questions is because I suspected that you didn't really know what you were talking about, I'm afraid that your answer rather supports that idea.

Whilst it is true that there can be gravitational interactions between galaxies the idea that a galaxy could become gravitationally locked like the moon doesn't make much sense. Galaxies are not solid objects, they do not rotate like solid objects. They consist of millions of stars all INDEPENDENTLY orbiting the centre of their galaxy. They orbit at different speeds depending on their distance from the centre.

A galaxy can no more become tidally locked than the entire solar system can become tidally locked. Whilst individual planets can become tidally locked to the sun, permanently keeping one face towards it, the system as a whole can not become tidally locked because the planets MUST move at different speeds. Samething with a galaxy.

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I notice that you do not supply any additional relevant information about Crater 2.

Does it rotate or does it not rotate? And to what degree? Those are the questions.

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