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Sharks have depleted functional diversity compared to the last 66 million years


Waspie_Dwarf

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Sharks have depleted functional diversity compared to the last 66 million years

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New research by Swansea University and the University of Zurich has found that sharks retained high levels of functional diversity for most of the last 66 million years, before steadily declining over the last 10 million years to its lowest value in the present day.

Modern sharks are among the ocean’s most threatened species; yet have notably survived numerous environmental changes in their 250-million-year history. Today, their more than 500 species play many different ecological roles, from apex predators to nutrient transporters.

Read More: ➡️ Swansea University

 

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The meglalodon was outcompeted by whales. 

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Id agree with Piney. Over the last 10 million years theres been a lot of ocean niches taken by aquatic mammals... dolphins, porpoises, whales... Not surprising sharks were out competed in some areas.

The most recent ice age era probably shook them up some too, As sea levels dropped and rose around 100 meters over and over and sharks specialized to local coastal areas would have been very vulnerable.

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4 hours ago, DieChecker said:

Id agree with Piney. Over the last 10 million years theres been a lot of ocean niches taken by aquatic mammals... dolphins, porpoises, whales... Not surprising sharks were out competed in some areas.

The most recent ice age era probably shook them up some too, As sea levels dropped and rose around 100 meters over and over and sharks specialized to local coastal areas would have been very vulnerable.

I wasn't thinking about that. But the last glaciation periods probably didn't help. That's why you find Miocene age sharks teeth miles inland. 

But the article talks about their decline in diversity since the Cretaceous extinction. That was probably the first hit. 

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