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Two New York men die falling into a manure tanker


Still Waters

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Two men have died in upstate New York after falling into a manure tanker, local police said.

One of the men attempted to retrieve a piece of equipment that had fallen into the tanker, the Kirkland Police Department told WKTV.

“He passed out and fell inside of the tanker,” police said, adding that the second man also passed out and fell in as he tried to help.

The incident happened on Thursday morning at a farm in Kirkland, New York, less than 50 miles (80km) east of Syracuse, New York.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/cd11plgrq89o

Quote

 The two victims have been identified as 33-year-old Nathan Doody of DeRuyter and 29-year-old Tyler Memory of Tully.

Both were volunteer firefighters — Doody volunteered at the Cuyler Fire Department and Memory volunteered at the Tully Fire Department.

https://cnycentral.com/news/local/2-men-fall-into-manure-tanker-in-oneida-county-both-hospitalized

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That's sad :cry:  How awful!

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Rest in peace, Firefighters. 

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It's a pretty common rescue trap that can occur in an environmental hazard situation (i.e., fumes). Can even get trained people - as in this case.

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Posted (edited)

Surprised they didn't wear some kind of gas mask or something. Or have one on hand in case of a situation like this.

Edited by Razman
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Both links are shy on why they were on a honey wagon in the first place, unless they were farmers who coincidentally were volunteer firefighters. 

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It doesn't appear that the two men were there in their capacity as volunteer fireman. It just happens that they were also volunteer firemen.

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I imagine that they broke rules.  The 2nd guy should not have helped the first man.  That is the rule for almost all of these situations.

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19 hours ago, Myles said:

I imagine that they broke rules.  The 2nd guy should not have helped the first man.  That is the rule for almost all of these situations.

Ammonia fumes. You don't attempt a rescue without a Scott pack. 

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1 hour ago, Piney said:

Ammonia fumes. You don't attempt a rescue without a Scott pack. 

They should also have been tethered.

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1 minute ago, Myles said:

They should also have been tethered.

I saw a similar accident with a hydroseeder, which produces the same fumes. The employee fell in while rinsing it and the boss went in after him. Both died. 

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It  happened in our plant in a big rotating pot that rode on an argon bearing.  Argon was constantly pumped through the bearing to keep investing slurry out of it. No one had turned off the argon supply when the pot was emptied.  A sad oversight of the lock out tag out procedure. The first maintenance man climbed in to work on the bearing with tools and welding gear but no proper air supply.  He collapsed.    A few minutes later the second maintenance man arrived, saw his buddy down in the pot, sounded an alarm, figured out the problem, turned off the  argon supply put on a respirator mask and went down to help.  Several more maintenance people responded to lift him out. Sadly, the welder died of asphyxiation.   Argon is colorless, odorless and denser than air.  It replaced all of the oxygen in the pot. The second man survived and did everything right, but couldn't save his friend, he had been in the pot too long,   We lost one 

I worked in industries where there were  serious accidents  or fatalities every few years.  So much of the time it was either new hires without any awareness of dangers or very experienced old timers  taking shortcuts and not obeying safety procedures.

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12 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

It  happened in our plant in a big rotating pot that rode on an argon bearing.  Argon was constantly pumped through the bearing to keep investing slurry out of it. No one had turned off the argon supply when the pot was emptied.  A sad oversight of the lock out tag out procedure. The first maintenance man climbed in to work on the bearing with tools and welding gear but no proper air supply.  He collapsed.    A few minutes later the second maintenance man arrived, saw his buddy down in the pot, sounded an alarm, figured out the problem, turned off the  argon supply put on a respirator mask and went down to help.  Several more maintenance people responded to lift him out. Sadly, the welder died of asphyxiation.   Argon is colorless, odorless and denser than air.  It replaced all of the oxygen in the pot. The second man survived and did everything right, but couldn't save his friend, he had been in the pot too long,   We lost one 

I worked in industries where there were  serious accidents  or fatalities every few years.  So much of the time it was either new hires without any awareness of dangers or very experienced old timers  taking shortcuts and not obeying safety procedures.

And your familiar with Lane sawmill. Unchanged since the 1800s. Climbing in the sawdust pit to fix a sump pump while that 60 in beast is spinning inches from your spine. Or having a dog jump on the return ripping all the teeth off and carbide tips flying at you like bullets.

 

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Is it too soon to say that this would have been a really s***ty way to die? 

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2 hours ago, Piney said:

And your familiar with Lane sawmill. Unchanged since the 1800s. Climbing in the sawdust pit to fix a sump pump while that 60 in beast is spinning inches from your spine. Or having a dog jump on the return ripping all the teeth off and carbide tips flying at you like bullets.

 

Sounds like the good old days all right.  I'm very glad you made it through. We had to watch out for saw teeth being ripped off by spikes hidden in logs by tree huggers.   Bandsaws in our case. A broken saw could snake around the head rig so fast if you heard a bang, you better dive for the floor.  We had an off bearer standing right behind the throat up on the outfeed rollcase.  He ran the steam easy down arms for big cants and timbers.  Still a steam shotgun with a 40 foot travel and steam log turners, but the carriage had replaced human setters with electronics in the 70's.  Steam was amazingly responsive and fine to control on those things. Head dayshift sawyer nicknamed Lefty and you can guess why, missing a couple of fingers.  The swing shift sawyer  had only a thumb on his right hand, Since we already had a Lefty, he was just Joe, though he probably deserved the name more..Both of them lost fingers working up through other jobs before getting up to be head sawyers.

One of the fatalities when I was onsite was a conveyor chaser getting snagged and wrapped around the tail drum at a Weyco  mill.   I got to be a green chain foreman in that mill then backend foreman in about 1989.  When main conveyors plugged up, the 3 head rigs had to stop and we had to get things unplugged ASAP.  I was upstairs when we heard 5 whistles for help and the long whistle for injury.  Not good.  About a year later, I helped carry the head end foreman out on a stretcher.  He survived getting a breaker bar shot through his chest by an edger turned on before the maintenance guy got his socket off the arbor  The foreman was standing in the line of fire when he told the operator to start it up.  It was always go go go in those days, safety was not top concern.   We had to process cunits from the timber farm to generate income.  We cut 800k+ BF a day in 2 shifts.  Even for injuries and fatalities, the mill was not down  for more than a couple of hours. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Tatetopa said:

I got to be a green chain foreman in that mill then backend foreman in about 1989.  

How long did you work the green chain? I pulled lumber on the green chain for one paycheck and said screw this. Most boring dull job in my life. Cannot believe some people spent yrs or decades there. 

Edit: though I do get it, understand some guys had a mortgage, a wife, kids but still what a waste of existence. Some I suppose just did it for job security. And then complained daily about the union and the foremen over pints of beer. 

Edited by acidhead
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If they kept cattle on pasture like nature intended this wouldn't have happened.

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1 hour ago, acidhead said:

How long did you work the green chain? I pulled lumber on the green chain for one paycheck and said screw this. Most boring dull job in my life. Cannot believe some people spent yrs or decades there. 

Edit: though I do get it, understand some guys had a mortgage, a wife, kids but still what a waste of existence. Some I suppose just did it for job security. And then complained daily about the union and the foremen over pints of beer. 

It was in my romantic days.  I read Sometimes a Great Notion by Ken Kesey for a college lit course.  Its about Oregon and logging. Then they made a movie of it. My girlfriend was transferring to a college in Portland, so I came along and got a job in the timber industry in a gyppo sawmill when I was about 21.  Pulled chain for about a month then went on to other jobs, pond man, edger, gang saw, Cat 966 operator, loading and unloading log trucks, stacking logs and feeding the log pond.  Made me feel very macho.:devil:  I worked a couple of other small mills, bought a share in the last one and got tired of hard work and poverty. That took about 7 years, with a brief stint in the woods.  The thing is, I was having fun most of the time.  I got a lot tougher, stopped whining and feeling sorry for myself and learned to plod on.  I liked myself better afterwards.  And I know what is like to be poor and live a very basic life.  Its a good experience if you can get out of it. 

I decided to use my education and went to Weyco as an industrial engineer, transferred to management became  a supervisor and maintenance manager  for a few years then got tired of  the gloom and doom of a dying industry.  I moved on to titanium casting with a much brighter future.

But I still miss the smell of fresh cut fir and cedar.  

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14 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

Its a good experience if you can get out of it.

But I still miss the smell of fresh cut fir and cedar.  

Yeah, I hear ya. In my mid 20's I worked in that sawmill for two weeks, tree planted/spaced for two seasons and almost two yrs heli-logging working the landing area and rigging. Than worked in a hardwood mill for one yr running the only ripsaw.  Do I miss those jobs? Not in the slightest. But I did appreciate the experience and have no regrets but I grew tired of being out in the bush the middle of bumfvk nowhere.  When I smell fresh fir and cedar it reminds me of being all alone on the side of a mountain, surrounded by fallen trees,  spitting copenhagen listening to the Sikorsky in the distance while I wait my turns. A time not really that long ago but long enough to think back and be glad I don't do it anymore. Haha 

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They should be using the confined space rules or at minimum tie offs.

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