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Supermassive black hole appears to grow like a baby star


Waspie_Dwarf

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Supermassive black hole appears to grow like a baby star

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Supermassive black holes pose unanswered questions for astronomers around the world, not least “How do they grow so big?” Now, an international team of astronomers, including researchers from Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, has discovered a powerful rotating, magnetic wind that they believe is helping a galaxy’s central supermassive black hole to grow. The swirling wind, revealed with the help of the Alma telescope in nearby galaxy ESO320-G030, suggests that similar processes are involved both in black hole growth and the birth of stars.

Most galaxies, including our own Milky Way have a supermassive black hole at their centre. How these mind-bogglingly massive objects grow to weigh as much as millions or billions of stars is a long-standing question for astronomers.

Read More: ➡️ Chalmers University of Technology

 

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@Waspie_Dwarf I was wondering if the super massive black holes at the centers of old galaxies like ours started out as primordial black holes and just started gathering large nebula around them.

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3 minutes ago, Piney said:

@Waspie_Dwarf I was wondering if the super massive black holes at the centers of old galaxies like ours started out as primordial black holes and just started gathering large nebula around them.

They formed very quickly after the Big Bang, within the first billion years. This is probably not enough time for them to have formed from primordial black holes, which are atom sized.

In the early universe there were a population of supermassive stars. These would have been very short lived. It is thought that their collapse is what formed supermassive black holes.

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4 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

They formed very quickly after the Big Bang, within the first billion years. This is probably not enough time for them to have formed from primordial black holes, which are atom sized.

In the early universe there were a population of supermassive stars. These would have been very short lived. It is thought that their collapse is what formed supermassive black holes.

 I wasn't thinking about population 3 star.

 It's pretty incredible that the Milky Way's central black hole might of been one of the first stars in the universe. 

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