Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

Did the Solar System Once Collide with an Interstellar Cloud?


Waspie_Dwarf

Recommended Posts

Did the Solar System Once Collide with an Interstellar Cloud?

Astronomers have proposed a rather uncomfortable past for our solar system and our planet — as well as an alternative explanation for a radioactive anomaly on Earth.

Quote

Something strange happened to our solar system a few million years ago. Every time scientists analyze Antarctic ice cores, deep sea sediments, ferromanganese crusts, or even samples of lunar rock, they find something that shouldn’t be there: a radioactive isotope of iron, known as iron-60.

The isotope is not produced on Earth or the Moon, and its half-life is 2.6 million years — way too short for it to be a leftover of the solar system’s formative years. Careful dating showed something even more intriguing. Twice — around 2.5 million years ago and possibly also around 7 million years ago — significantly more iron-60 came to Earth than usual.

Read More: ➡️ Sky & Telescope

 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Did the Solar System Once Collide with an Interstellar Cloud?

Astronomers have proposed a rather uncomfortable past for our solar system and our planet — as well as an alternative explanation for a radioactive anomaly on Earth.

 

Have they considered thìs as a possible explanation:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eltanin_impact

?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Abramelin said:

Have they considered thìs as a possible 

Asteroids and comets are typically solar system objects left over from the early solar system, which excludes them as a source of Iron-60. From the article:

14 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

its half-life is 2.6 million years — way too short for it to be a leftover of the solar system’s formative years.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Abramelin said:

Have they considered thìs as a possible explanation:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eltanin_impact

?

Only if the meteorite was the product of a supernova.

Back in the early 2000s they were looking for it in meteorites and rarely found it. I think it was found in the Odessa, but it wasn't found in others. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Piney said:

Only if the meteorite was the product of a supernova.

Back in the early 2000s they were looking for it in meteorites and rarely found it. I think it was found in the Odessa, but it wasn't found in others. 

Iron-60 found in fossilised bacteria in sea floor sediments suggest there was a supernova in the vicinity of the Solar System approximately 2 million years ago.[14][15] Iron-60 is also found in sediments from 8 million years ago.[16] In 2019, researchers found interstellar 60Fe in Antarctica, which they relate to the Local Interstellar Cloud.[17]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotopes_of_iron

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

Iron-60 found in fossilised bacteria in sea floor sediments suggest there was a supernova in the vicinity of the Solar System approximately 2 million years ago.[14][15] Iron-60 is also found in sediments from 8 million years ago.[16] In 2019, researchers found interstellar 60Fe in Antarctica, which they relate to the Local Interstellar Cloud.[17]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotopes_of_iron

 

Which is what the OP basically said. We were in a busy area.

0ur solar system formed in a cloud from a binary neutron star merger. It's why we have gold and platinum.  

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Piney said:

Which is what the OP basically said. We were in a busy area.

0ur solar system formed in a cloud from a binary neutron star merger. It's why we have gold and platinum.  

At least there is - what I consider - proof of an impact:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/23842400_The_Late_Pliocene_Eltanin_Impact_Documentation_From_Sediment_Core_Analyses

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

There most certainly is proof of a impact, but I didn't see any Fe60 in the core samples. But I didn't look hard either. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Piney said:

There most certainly is proof of a impact, but I didn't see any Fe60 in the core samples. But I didn't look hard either. 

There are 2 theories:

1 - the latest theory: our system passed through a interstellar cloud;

2 - a supernova explosion.

Both give rise to Fe60.

But...only -2- could have sent an asteroid towards earth.

---

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/224709571_The_Search_for_Supernova-Produced_Radionuclides_in_Terrestrial_Deep-Sea_Archives

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Abramelin said:

But...only -2- could have sent an asteroid towards earth.

You are making the classic logical error. Correlation does not imply causation.

There is no reason to assume that the asteroid strike had anything to do with either a supernova OR an interstellar cloud. The asteroid impact is irrelevant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

You are making the classic logical error. Correlation does not imply causation.

There is no reason to assume that the asteroid strike had anything to do with either a supernova OR an interstellar cloud. The asteroid impact is irrelevant.

The asteroid impact happened at the same time as the probable passing of the solar system through an interstellar cloud.

The same impact was also considered a cause for the presence of Fe60.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Abramelin said:

The asteroid impact happened at the same time as the probable passing of the solar system through an interstellar cloud.

Irrelevant. Correlation does not imply causation.

1 minute ago, Abramelin said:

The same impact was also considered a cause for the presence of Fe60.

Do you have a source for this claim, as the Wiki article you have quoted directly contradicts this?

I repeat, asteroids and comets* are solar system objects, they are billions of years and and, therefore, can not be the source of a material with a half life of 2.6 million years.

 

*The only exception to this are those rare objects of interstellar origin, they have been in interstellar space for hundreds of millions, or billions, of years and so also can not be the source of 60Fe.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Do you have a source for this claim, as the Wiki article you have quoted directly contradicts this?

It was supposed to be the link in post 9, but it's the wrong link.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Waspie_Dwarf

A question:

If it wàs a supernova exploding close enough to our solar system, but not close enough to kill all life on Earth, could it be possible that a 'bolid' ejected from that star and arrived on Earth fast enough to still have a detectable amount of iron-60?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Abramelin said:

@Waspie_Dwarf

A question:

If it wàs a supernova exploding close enough to our solar system, but not close enough to kill all life on Earth, could it be possible that a 'bolid' ejected from that star and arrived on Earth fast enough to still have a detectable amount of iron-60?

That would have to be too close and we wouldn't be here. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, so all of this is just an almost unbelievable coincidence:

A bolid/asteroid/whatever impacted near Antarctica/Chile and is supposed to have started the Paleolithic.

Ànd the solar system travelled though an interstellar cloud, ànd... caused the start of the Paleolithic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

Ok, so all of this is just an almost unbelievable coincidence:

A bolid/asteroid/whatever impacted near Antarctica/Chile and is supposed to have started the Paleolithic.

Ànd the solar system travelled though an interstellar cloud, ànd... caused the start of the Paleolithic.

Correction;

Paleolithic must of course be Pleistocene.

 

Edited to add:

And those samples (Fe60) were taken from Antarctica. Near Antarctica the Eltanin bolid impacted into a mile deep sea.

Edited by Abramelin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

@Waspie_Dwarf

A question:

If it wàs a supernova exploding close enough to our solar system, but not close enough to kill all life on Earth, could it be possible that a 'bolid' ejected from that star and arrived on Earth fast enough to still have a detectable amount of iron-60?

No. A supernova explosion is the destruction of a star... a big ball of hot gas. It would eject gas and dust, not solid asteroids. It is possible that solid objects such as comets, asteroids and planets could form in the nebula formed but this is a process that would take millions of years and then would need a second source of energy to eject it from orbit around the supernova remnant.

Secondly, for a supernova far enough away not to cause a mass extinction it would have to be 30 to 50 ly away. If an asteroid to arrive here quickly enough to be the source of the 60Fe it would have to be travelling at phenomenal speed. An asteroid hitting the earth at those kinds of speeds is likely to cause a mass extinction itself.

The timing of this impact is a coincidence.

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

An asteroid hitting the earth at those kinds of speeds is likely to cause a mass extinction itself.

Like a Vogon demolition laser. 

 

I'll see myself out.......😬

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Piney said:

Like a Vogon demolition laser.

More like a Centauri Mass Driver from Babylon 5.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

The timing of this impact is a coincidence

And thàt's what I have doubts about.

It's possible this whole theory of our solar system travelling through an interstellar cloud is wrong.

Nice theory, but wrong.

But there's sedimental proof something big impacted hère, 2,5 millions of years ago (see red dot on map below):

Screenshot_20240623-195924_Firefox.jpg.c795e775e78793013d4a1d0d2480ab0e.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

More like a Centauri Mass Driver from Babylon 5.

 Londo was not happy with Refa for using them. 

Londo offing the Emperor, "taking care" of Morden and bombing the Shadow base is one of my favorite story arcs. 

 

Edited by Piney
brain fart
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

And thàt's what I have doubts about.

It's possible this whole theory of our solar system travelling through an interstellar cloud is wrong.

Nice theory, but wrong.

Our system orbits the galaxy, so what's "wrong"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

And thàt's what I have doubts about.

It's possible this whole theory of our solar system travelling through an interstellar cloud is wrong.

Nice theory, but wrong.

But there's sedimental proof something big impacted hère, 2,5 millions of years ago (see red dot on map below):

Screenshot_20240623-195924_Firefox.jpg.c795e775e78793013d4a1d0d2480ab0e.jpg

Which part of, "an asteroid impact could not be the cause of the 60Fe spike" are you failing to grasp?

Even if the earth didn't pass through an interstellar cloud then that is not evidence that you are correct. There is NO evidence that you are right. There is plenty of evidence that you don't understand the concept that, "correlation is not causation". Your entire argument is based on a logical fallacy.

We are going round and round in circles and you simply can't grasp why your argument is without merit.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Which part of, "an asteroid impact could not be the cause of the 60Fe spike" are you failing to grasp?

I think the theory about our solar system passing through an interstellar cloud is very interesting, but also very possibly wrong.

I also understand an impact of an asteroid - if that is what it was - could not cause the ⁶⁰Fe spike.

But what was it then?

You tell me.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.