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54 die in India after drinking toxic alcohol


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The death toll has climbed to 54 from consumption of tainted liquor in India’s southern state of Tamil Nadu, with more than 100 people still in hospital, a government official said on Saturday.

Nearly 200 people have been treated since Wednesday for vomiting, stomach aches and diarrhea, after drinking liquor spiked with methanol in the district of Kallakurichi, about 250 km (150 miles) from Chennai, the state capital.

Law enforcement officials investigating the incident have arrested seven people, said M.S. Prasanth, a senior district official, adding that follow-up action was being taken against liquor sellers and brewers in the district.

https://www.arabnews.pk/node/2535756/world

https://www.news9live.com/india/would-call-it-murder-not-death-bjp-slams-india-blocs-silence-over-tamil-nadu-hooch-tragedy-2589097

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Posted (edited)

 Alcohol has been forbidden in a few states in India in accordance with the vision of Gandhi as well as teachings of religious scriptures of Hinduism, Buddhism,Sikhism and Islam. 

The states where alcohol has been prohibited has shown better statistics with relation to lower crime rates, accident rates and better socio-economic benefits.

 However alcohol consumption continues in other states as it is considered a major source of government revenue with support from affluent corporate lobby groups  . This has resulted in alcohol prohibition not coming into effect at a national level till date. 

 Shoddy government supervision has also resulted in tragedies as such.

Edited by Ajay0
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On 6/23/2024 at 11:52 PM, Ajay0 said:

 Alcohol has been forbidden in a few states in India in accordance with the vision of Gandhi as well as teachings of religious scriptures of Hinduism, Buddhism,Sikhism and Islam. 

The states where alcohol has been prohibited has shown better statistics with relation to lower crime rates, accident rates and better socio-economic benefits.

 However alcohol consumption continues in other states as it is considered a major source of government revenue with support from affluent corporate lobby groups  . This has resulted in alcohol prohibition not coming into effect at a national level till date. 

 Shoddy government supervision has also resulted in tragedies as such.

Well prohibition worked wonderfully here in the States...said no one ever.

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Geez, makes dysentery from their water a preferable choice.  Give me diarrhoea over their toxic alcohol any day.

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1 hour ago, Black Red Devil said:

Geez, makes dysentery from their water a preferable choice.  Give me diarrhoea over their toxic alcohol any day.

You can easily access diarrhoea in Aussie swimming pools as well. 

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2024/feb/13/avoid-swimming-pools-if-youre-part-of-australias-surge-in-diarrhoea-cases-say-authorities

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Cryptosporidium parasite causes 498 diarrhoea cases in NSW this year and 736 in Queensland in January alone.

Health authorities are urging people with diarrhoea to avoid swimming pools as cryptosporidiosis infections surge across New South Wales and Queensland.

The cryptosporidium parasite, which causes acute diarrhoea and can survive in chlorinated water for many days, has been responsible for 498 cases of diarrhoea in NSW this year – a five-fold increase on the five-year average of 95 for the same period.

In Queensland, 736 cases were reported in January alone, representing a 13-fold increase on January 2023 cases. Of those, 39% were in children aged nine or under.

 

 
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23 hours ago, Ajay0 said:

Sure, but the percentages are a lot higher in India.  It's actually even embarrassing to compare the cases in India compared to Australia.

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49 minutes ago, Black Red Devil said:

Sure, but the percentages are a lot higher in India.  It's actually even embarrassing to compare the cases in India compared to Australia.

Well, we have the largest population in the world compared to the twenty million in Australia. It would be absurd to compare. 

There are many  doctors of Indian origin in Australia and I am sure that issues of diarrhoea can be easily taken care of. 

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Posted (edited)

Health issues due to alcohol consumption is also a major issue in Australia. Around half the population is suffering from ill-health on that account. Statistics shows that in 2022 alone, around 1742 people in Australia died of alcohol induced diseases and alcohol poisoning.

https://www.latrobe.edu.au/news/articles/2023/release/10-million-australians-harmed-by-alcohol-each-year

 

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“Alcoholic products cause too much harm to far too many Australians. The fear, hurt, anxiety and anguish that results from alcohol’s impact on partners, families and communities – the negative effects are far reaching and devastating,” Ms Giorgi said.

“It doesn’t have to be this way. Governments across Australia can take action to ensure common sense measures are put in place so that families and communities are safe, and so that alcohol companies are not exploiting people through practices like targeted digital marketing which prey on people at their most vulnerable and make every phone a bottle shop.”

Alcohol and Drug Foundation CEO Dr Erin Lalor said the rate of alcohol harm in Australia was “alarmingly high” and that evidence-based measures were needed to prevent it.

“We cannot accept the high levels of harm that alcohol causes to individuals, families, and our communities,” Dr Lalor said.

 

 

https://fare.org.au/alcohol-induced-deaths-in-australia/

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The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Causes of Death report shows that in 2022, 1,742 people in Australia died of an alcohol-induced deaths, such as chronic conditions like liver cirrhosis or acute conditions such as alcohol poisoning. Alcohol-induced deaths were recorded at a rate of 6.0 deaths for every 100,000 people living in Australia – the highest rate reported in a decade. Men are twice as likely to die from alcohol as compared to women. Tasmania, Queensland and New South Wales reported alcohol-induced deaths rates that were higher than the national death rate.

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Ajay0 said:

Well, we have the largest population in the world compared to the twenty million in Australia. It would be absurd to compare. 

There are many  doctors of Indian origin in Australia and I am sure that issues of diarrhoea can be easily taken care of. 

No, I'm talking proportionally.  Below is a map showing the deaths per million inhabitants (data from 2012).  India is in the bracket from 451-606 (deaths per million due to diarrhoea), Australia is in the bracket from 3-10.  Check the map and the statistics in the link.  That's a big difference.

As for your following post regarding Australia's alcohol problem.  That is partially true but it's not the worse in the world.  Nobody said we live in utopia and it's not that bad considering Indian doctors do prefer to work here.  Probably because India, despite being one of the most racists and discriminating countries in the world with its caste system and despite having its huge poverty issues with $12.9% of the population living with less than $2.15 a day (Australia 0.5%), or even better, a massive 81.8% (which includes the 12.9%) living with less than $6.85 per day (Australia 1.0%), your doctors prefer to earn more money here rather than stay in India and fix the massive poverty, growing population and health issues there. link

image.thumb.png.db50223319309af38d9db3799d14b596.png

Edited by Black Red Devil
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On 6/29/2024 at 4:03 PM, Black Red Devil said:

Sure, but the percentages are a lot higher in India.  It's actually even embarrassing to compare the cases in India compared to Australia.

 

On 6/29/2024 at 6:07 PM, Black Red Devil said:

No, I'm talking proportionally.  Below is a map showing the deaths per million inhabitants (data from 2012).  India is in the bracket from 451-606 (deaths per million due to diarrhoea), Australia is in the bracket from 3-10.  Check the map and the statistics in the link.  That's a big difference.


The monsoons each year brings heavy rainfall to India from around June to September, ending its dry spell of hot weather. The monsoons are vital for its high agricultural productivity that enables India to be the second highest food producer in the world with agricultural output more than half a trillion dollars each year. 

However a negative is that it is at this point that cases of water-borne illnesses like malaria, filariasis and diarrhea rises as well, which has resulted in a body of Indian physicians specialised in tropical medicine due to research, training and extensive experience.

Australia is a desert island which receives a very low annual average rainfall of 419 mm.  India on the other hand received around 1170 mm of rainfall annually. 

This is a major reason for the contrast in dysentry cases between India and Australia. 

You can see here an Indian website dedicated to warnings over water-borne illnesses during the monsoon season.

https://pharmeasy.in/blog/common-illnesses-during-monsoons-in-india/
 

Quote

As for your following post regarding Australia's alcohol problem.  That is partially true but it's not the worse in the world.

 


It may not be worse, but it is definitely coming to a critical stage with over half the Australian population diseased due to alcohol abuse. Do be warned. 

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/oct/19/alcohol-induced-deaths-in-australia-at-their-highest-in-10-years-study-finds

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Alcohol-induced deaths are at their highest rate in 10 years, driven by conditions that can be caused by long-term drinking such as late-stage liver disease, neurodegenerative diseases and heart failure.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/oct/26/alcogenic-society-australian-hospitals-see-steep-rise-in-severe-alcohol-related-disease

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‘Alcogenic society’: Australian hospitals see steep rise in severe alcohol-related disease
With alcohol-induced deaths at their highest rate in 10 years, one doctor says a quarter of his hospital’s ICU resources are being used to treat the illness.

One quarter of intensive care resources in a major regional tertiary hospital have been used to treat critical illness directly related to alcohol consumption, a Queensland physician claims.

The intensive care physician told Guardian Australia he was alarmed at the steep rise in cases of severe, end-stage alcohol-related disease he has seen “in just a couple of years” at the hospital.

“I have never seen so many jaundiced and confused 40 and 50-year-olds dying of liver failure,” he said.

 

 

Quote

  Nobody said we live in utopia and it's not that bad considering Indian doctors do prefer to work here. 

 


There is a shortage of doctors in Australia for decades, and this is why Indian physicians come and work there. 

https://www.orbostregionalhealth.com.au/news/why-is-there-a-shortage-of-gps-in-rural-australia-lets-ask-one

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The shortage of doctors in rural communities all over Australia is a decades-old problem for which, unfortunately, no one has yet invented a magic cure.
Despite a number of requirements and incentives designed to push more local and overseas doctors to rural areas, a study by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare in 2020 found that around 20 percent of Australia’s rural population were unable to see a GP due to none being close by.

And almost 60 percent said they had no access to specialists in their region.

 

Medical studies are not for lazy bums fond of partying and surfing. 

There is rigorous work involved both academically and professionally compared to other professions, and which come with lack of personal time, extra-curricular activities and other sacrifices. There has to be constant diligence as well during the heavy work schedules as errors during prescription or surgery can lead to lawsuits and loss of licence as well as public outrage. The pay is also not on par with other lucrative professions like engineering or corporate workers.

I know of successful doctors lamenting over not choosing other professions due to the heavy stress, workload and personal costs involved.

For this reason many students opt for other less demanding professions especially in affluent countries where there is adequate options for fun and sensory pleasures. 

In India, due to traditional, ethical and religious reasons there is high prestige associated with the medical profession and consequently there is a large number of students in medical colleges and there are no empty seats.

Many Indian students also enroll in foreign universities around the world to study the medical profession as well. This has resulted in India having the third largest number of physicians after China and the US as per statistics, and the numbers are continually growing due to the high proportion of youth in the Indian population.

The study phase (Brahmacharya-sadhana) is also highly emphasized in ancient Indian culture with relation to attaining proficiency in academics, music, martial arts, dance and arts with a lot of focus on developing concentration, adhering to a spartan lifestyle abstaining from sensory pleasures, and willingly enduring discomfort and privations in this regard. 

Examples of high achievers like Arjuna, Duryodhana and Hanuman are cited from the ancient scriptures in this regard as well. 

Due to the high population in India, Indian doctors get extensive experience in a short period of time, resulting in high proficiency in general. 

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I also wish to state that the proficiency and low costs associated with  medicinal systems in India has resulted in a medical tourism industry that generates billions of dollars in revenue each year from foreign medical tourists with a significant number of them from the west due to the unaffordably high healthcare costs over there.

https://www.medicalbuyer.co.in/indian-hospitals-report-huge-increase-in-international-patient-revenue-in-h1fy24/

https://www.laingbuissonnews.com/imtj/news-imtj/india-medical-tourism-revenue-will-reach-us13-billion-by-2026/

https://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/india-medical-tourism-market

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The medical tourism industry in India is estimated to be valued at US$ 10,362.9 million in 2024. It is projected to surpass US$ 50,670.5 million by 2034. The industry growth in India is expected to develop at a healthy 17.20% CAGR from 2024 to 2034.

 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/29/2024 at 6:07 PM, Black Red Devil said:

  Probably because India, despite being one of the most racists and discriminating countries in the world with its caste system ...


Hope you are aware that the present president and prime minister of India came from the lowest castes. 

The UK, Ireland, Portugal, Mauritius, Singapore, Malaysia has had prime ministers and presidents of Indian origin while the American vice-president is also of Indian origin. 

Do tell me when Australia has had a native Australian or Indian-Australian president, considering their substantial representation in the Aussie population !

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35 minutes ago, Ajay0 said:


Hope you are aware that the present president and prime minister of India came from the lowest castes. 

The UK, Ireland, Portugal, Mauritius, Singapore, Malaysia has had prime ministers and presidents of Indian origin while the American vice-president is also of Indian origin. 

Do tell me when Australia has had a native Australian or Indian-Australian president, considering their substantial representation in the Aussie population !

Substantial representation?! Some 3% of the population are of Indian ancestry and you already want to have a Prime Minister?  :lol: Wait your turn and fix your own caste problems before trying to claim other countries are racists.  link 

Sure, Australia has had it's own problems with discrimination against Aborigines and non white policies in the past but at least we don't have an integrated system that's part of their culture like the caste system.

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50 minutes ago, Black Red Devil said:

Substantial representation?! Some 3% of the population are of Indian ancestry and you already want to have a Prime Minister?  :lol:

The aforesaid heads of state have also come from minority communities  in their countries. The  Indian-Australians  are the highest educated migrant group in Australia with 54.6% of Indians in Australia having a bachelor's or higher degree, more than three times Australia's national average.

Quote

Sure, Australia has had it's own problems with discrimination against Aborigines and non white policies in the past but at least we don't have an integrated system that's part of their culture like the caste system.

The caste system is a feudal system that came up in India similar to that in Europe and Japan. 

It does not have sanction in the Vedas which denotes the equality and fraternity of all human beings. 

Majority of the Vedic sages came from the lower economic groups .

The Vedic sage, Satyakama Jabala, who composed portions of the Vedas, was the illegitimate son of a prostitute. He was taken as a disciple by his Guru on account of his character and honesty which the Guru perceived as signs of merit even though he was of illegitimate lineage.

The caste system came up later on as a social system in order to preserve, consolidate and develop knowledge systems of each profession. Universities were not wide-spread in ancient times, and it was easier for the father to teach his sons and nephews the technical details of his profession.

This enabled a certain specialisation of disciplines. For example, mathematics as in the numeral system, zero and basic mathematics used around the world commonly were developed in India. 

I am not an advocate of the caste system as it is obviously obsolete in today's world, but it had its relevance in ancient times as a practical system. In todays world however, you can choose any profession, and the best universities in the world teaching that course by virtue of enhanced transportation and logistics. 

The caste system continues at present by mere tradition alone as an extended family and social security system, much like tribal affiliations.

The caste system has been subjected to criticism by reformatory Hindu sects like the Arya Samaj, Brahmo Samaj, Lingayats and Brahmakumaris.

Caste  is also not recognized by the constitution and caste discrimination is punishable as per law. There are reservations and quotas for the lower castes in education and employment in government sectors, as well as funds and laws for their empowerment. And this has enabled many of the underprivileged castes to climb up the social ladder.

I myself stem from the lower castes as well. 

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35 minutes ago, Ajay0 said:

The aforesaid heads of state have also come from minority communities  in their countries. The  Indian-Australians  are the highest educated migrant group in Australia with 54.6% of Indians in Australia having a bachelor's or higher degree, more than three times Australia's national average.

Yet 81% of your population lives under the poverty line.  That equals approximately 1 billion 135 million if you divide 81% into 1,4billion. Disgraceful. 

Still leaves you approximately 270 million living above the poverty line and probably several times the population of Australia potentially and financially viable to study, enroll around the world, buy property and do many things most common Australians don't have the luxury to do.  That said, because millions of Indians have the potential to do what most Australians don't, it doesn't mean we give them certain priviliges.  We don't vote in our politicians based on what caste they belong to or how much money they have in their bank account.  We don't even vote them by their Uni degrees.

1 hour ago, Ajay0 said:

The caste system is a feudal system that came up in India similar to that in Europe and Japan. 

It does not have sanction in the Vedas which denotes the equality and fraternity of all human beings. 

Majority of the Vedic sages came from the lower economic groups .

The Vedic sage, Satyakama Jabala, who composed portions of the Vedas, was the illegitimate son of a prostitute. He was taken as a disciple by his Guru on account of his character and honesty which the Guru perceived as signs of merit even though he was of illegitimate lineage.

The caste system came up later on as a social system in order to preserve, consolidate and develop knowledge systems of each profession. Universities were not wide-spread in ancient times, and it was easier for the father to teach his sons and nephews the technical details of his profession.

This enabled a certain specialisation of disciplines. For example, mathematics as in the numeral system, zero and basic mathematics used around the world commonly were developed in India. 

I am not an advocate of the caste system as it is obviously obsolete in today's world, but it had its relevance in ancient times as a practical system. In todays world however, you can choose any profession, and the best universities in the world teaching that course by virtue of enhanced transportation and logistics. 

The caste system continues at present by mere tradition alone as an extended family and social security system, much like tribal affiliations.

The caste system has been subjected to criticism by reformatory Hindu sects like the Arya Samaj, Brahmo Samaj, Lingayats and Brahmakumaris.

Caste  is also not recognized by the constitution and caste discrimination is punishable as per law. There are reservations and quotas for the lower castes in education and employment in government sectors, as well as funds and laws for their empowerment. And this has enabled many of the underprivileged castes to climb up the social ladder.

I myself stem from the lower castes as well. 

I could go on forever and provide links.  These are three showing India still has a discrimination problem.

How India’s caste system keeps Dalits from accessing disaster relief

Under India’s caste system, Dalits are considered untouchable. The coronavirus is intensifying that slur

The struggle to challenge India's caste system remains real, still

 

Also, about your claim regarding Australia's drinking problem, see link

Basically 4.9% of Indian's population of 15 years and above has an alcohol problem, Australia has a 4.4%.  :lol: 

In case you're doubting the source its from the WHO.

 

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, Black Red Devil said:

Yet 81% of your population lives under the poverty line.  That equals approximately 1 billion 135 million if you divide 81% into 1,4billion. Disgraceful. 

 I admit that I am the poorest man in India and the world. Would my confession be enough for you to have high self-esteem and feel good about yourselves by comparison, and leave the poor around the world alone.

Jesus and Buddha were practically poor and penniless themselves. You can financially compare yourselves favorably with them as well and feel good about it. 

Since you are financially better than them, you can argue with Christian and Buddhist priests in churches and temples to replace their images and statues with yours. 

You have my full backing in this regard as long as you pay my consultation fees in time.

Edited by Ajay0
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46 minutes ago, Ajay0 said:

 I admit that I am the poorest man in India and the world. Would my confession be enough for you to have high self-esteem and feel good about yourselves by comparison, and leave the poor around the world alone.

Jesus and Buddha were practically poor and penniless themselves. You can financially compare yourselves favorably with them as well and feel good about it. 

Since you are financially better than them, you can argue with Christian and Buddhist priests in churches and temples to replace their images and statues with yours. 

You have my full backing in this regard as long as you pay my consultation fees in time.

I've got no idea what you're on about here. See ya. :st

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Ajay0 said:

 I admit that I am the poorest man in India and the world. Would my confession be enough for you to have high self-esteem and feel good about yourselves by comparison, and leave the poor around the world alone.

Jesus and Buddha were practically poor and penniless themselves. You can financially compare yourselves favorably with them as well and feel good about it. 

Since you are financially better than them, you can argue with Christian and Buddhist priests in churches and temples to replace their images and statues with yours. 

You have my full backing in this regard as long as you pay my consultation fees in time.

Talking about Indians in Australia, reminds me about a story my wife told me some 15 years ago. Shopping at our regular Supermarket, she came across this young, pretty Indian girl several times at the checkout counter. The girl was always very polite, big smile, working part-time because she was studying at Uni, but my wife couldn't fail to notice she always had this sad frown on her face which she thought was probably caused by the pressure of working and studying.  

Several months past and she hadn't come across the girl or noticed her working there anymore, so one day she asked another Indian girl working there, that she knew was her friend, "what happened to whatshername, did she leave the job?". The girl became sad and whispered "she committed suicide".  Of course my wife was stunned, such a young pretty girl, beautiful smile, studying with a whole future in front of her.! "WHY, WHAT HAPPENED?"

The girl told my wife "whatshername" confided with her that she met this Aussie kid also studying at Uni and started falling in love with him.  She told her parents, who rejected the idea of her falling in love outside her race, that she was promised in marriage to another kid living in India and they would move the girl to another Uni.  Don't know for how long this went on but eventually the girl must have found herself cornered and desperate and eventually took her life.

I know quite a few Indians here in Australia through work and I know two facts are true, 1) arranged marriages are prominent in India, 2) boys and (especially) girls are "encouraged", to avoid family "complications", to marry within their own caste, community and race.

 

Edited by Black Red Devil
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5 hours ago, Black Red Devil said:

I know quite a few Indians here in Australia through work and I know two facts are true, 1) arranged marriages are prominent in India, 2) boys and (especially) girls are "encouraged", to avoid family "complications", to marry within their own caste, community and race.

As I stated earlier, casteism has no sanction in the Vedas and is a feudal man-made system that came later on. It continues as a sort of tribal identity that is being diluted with increasing awareness and education. As a member of the lower castes, I have faced discrimination from the upper castes a few times, but they were usually old-timers steeped in ignorance and prejudice. The younger generation of the upper castes due to better education and interaction with the lower castes in common schools, colleges and employment institutions are usually free of such prejudices. Increasing urbanisation have also helped bring about this change

Hindu reformatory sects like the  Arya Samaj which has a wide following in India and the world, along with many others, have enabled a large number of inter-caste marriages. Inter-religious and international marriages are also quite common these days.

I know of many Indians who have married Aussies as well. 

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21 hours ago, Black Red Devil said:

Substantial representation?! Some 3% of the population are of Indian ancestry and you already want to have a Prime Minister? 


It is hard for me to figure why you are so averse to the idea of an Indian-Australian president or prime minister.

I have stated earlier of the critical shortage of doctors in Australia and how Indian physicians have filled the vacuum to a large extent. Through their service spanning many years they have saved hundreds of thousands of Australian lives. 

They are the unsung heroes of Aussie society, if you ask me, responsible for ensuring their collective health .

Perhaps you may not recall, but as a child you might have been  examined by an Indian-Australian paediatrician for illnesses,vaccinated and cured of any diseases. Indian-Australian- nurses may have changed your diapers as well after cleaning you up.

Considering the leonine services rendered by the Australian-Indian health practitioners to the Australian nation, I would say it is high time Australia has had a Indian-Australian president or prime minister. :tu:

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On 7/2/2024 at 6:54 PM, Ajay0 said:


It is hard for me to figure why you are so averse to the idea of an Indian-Australian president or prime minister.

I have stated earlier of the critical shortage of doctors in Australia and how Indian physicians have filled the vacuum to a large extent. Through their service spanning many years they have saved hundreds of thousands of Australian lives. 

They are the unsung heroes of Aussie society, if you ask me, responsible for ensuring their collective health .

Perhaps you may not recall, but as a child you might have been  examined by an Indian-Australian paediatrician for illnesses,vaccinated and cured of any diseases. Indian-Australian- nurses may have changed your diapers as well after cleaning you up.

Considering the leonine services rendered by the Australian-Indian health practitioners to the Australian nation, I would say it is high time Australia has had a Indian-Australian president or prime minister. :tu:

I'm not averse to any specific race or colour as long as they do their job and are representative of the Australian citizen, only the Australian citizen, irrelevant of their ethnic background. Nevertheless, as explained in post # 13 the percentage of an Indian PM is low considering the number of migrants is small compared to other ethnicities and to add, Indian migration in larg(er) numbers has only happened in recent decades. I don't even recall seeing any in the Federal Parliament, Labour or Liberal.

But I get the impression you put a lot of importance on your race and seem to think we should reward someone because of where they come from, because of a degree and/or their achievements, as if no one else in the past or present in this country has done anything.  For a country with a small population but many rich resources Australia has been punching above its weight forever, even before the arrival of Indian migrants.  But past migrants have fine tuned our country for the better also through hard work and most importantly, adopting and not trying to change the countries identity.  The country has improved a lot on its racial issues it once had and has become a very Liberal nation (in the sense of classical Liberalism, not political ideology). 

If I can dare to speak for all Australians, I believe we're very casual, don't take things too serious, tell it straight as it is and don't like others to bother us in our ways of life. We're obviously not perfect.  If I'm judging some other country on a discussion forum it's because there are statistics to back up the argument, you can do the same with Australia, no problem.  But you have to back it up with factual statistics and you haven't. All you've done is try to glorify some priviliged individuals from a country where 81% of their similar kind live under the poverty line with a high percentage of deaths due to unhygienic conditions. 

Just to go off track and add something as a side note, the whole Indian subcontinent is probably the worse region in the world for pollution. link  India, Pakistan and Bangladesh are in the top 8 worse nations.  These three nations alone amount to almost a quarter of the worlds population.  Maybe you should worry about this and the high percent of poverty rather than pampering to priviliged individuals because they're Indian.

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2 hours ago, Black Red Devil said:

I'm not averse to any specific race or colour as long as they do their job and are representative of the Australian citizen, only the Australian citizen, irrelevant of their ethnic background. Nevertheless, as explained in post # 13 the percentage of an Indian PM is low considering the number of migrants is small compared to other ethnicities and to add, Indian migration in larg(er) numbers has only happened in recent decades. I don't even recall seeing any in the Federal Parliament, Labour or Liberal.But I get the impression you put a lot of importance on your race and seem to think we should reward someone because of where they come from, because of a degree and/or their achievements, as if no one else in the past or present in this country has done anything. 

You made allegations about the racist character of the Indian nation and I responded saying that both our present president and prime minister being of the lower castes.

 But you have not given the names of any native Australian or Indian-Australian prime ministers till date in the Australian nation.

The Indian-Australian community is the largest diaspora in Australia as well and the fastest growing too. So obviously, as a democratic nation the Indian-Australians must be given their due share in the governance.

Also the native Australians are facing increasingly higher discrimination levels as per research and statistics...

https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/campaigns/2015/08/why-saying-aborigine-isnt-ok-8-facts-about-indigenous-people-in-australia/

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Racial discrimination became illegal in Australia in 1976, but that hasn’t protected Indigenous people from still being much worse off, including in terms of health, education and unemployment. Many end up trapped by poverty and crime. Today, Australia’s Indigenous kids are 24 times more likely to be locked up than their non-Indigenous classmates.

New generations have inherited their relatives’ deep trauma and anger from losing their lands, cultures and families. To make things worse, the Australian Government has trotted out policies that effectively take away Indigenous Peoples’ basic rights – such as the Northern Territory Intervention – and forced Indigenous people to abandon their homes and communities.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/may/24/discrimination-against-indigenous-australians-has-risen-dramatically-survey-finds

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Major discrimination against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – like being unfairly denied a job or unfairly discouraged from continuing education – remains at elevated levels and is far higher than for the rest of the population, according to new data.

Researchers at Monash University, on behalf of Inclusive Australia, surveyed people over several years on a number of measures, including their experiences of discrimination, feelings of belonging and wellbeing, and prejudices towards minority groups.

The survey found the percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who reported experiencing at least one form of major discrimination increased dramatically in 2019 from 28.6% to 52.1%, and remains very high at 49.7%.

 

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2023/10/6/as-vote-nears-horrific-racism-mars-australian-voice-referendum-campaign

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Days away from an historic referendum on Indigenous rights in Australia, the racism that has marred the campaign for weeks has intensified amid flagging public support for the proposed constitutional “Voice to Parliament”.

On Thursday, a video was released on social media showing a hooded man making a series of racist remarks against Indigenous peoples, before burning an Aboriginal flag and giving a Nazi salute.

The man, who was unidentified, also singled out Indigenous Independent Federal Senator Lidia Thorpe, who has been subject to a barrage of online racism and at times, death threats, since she entered the political arena in 2020.

The threats have got worse in the lead-up to the referendum, scheduled for October 14.

“People want to kill me out there. They don’t want my voice to be heard,” a visibly upset and angry Thorpe said at a press conference in response to the video. She railed against Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, accused the police of failing to protect her and challenged those who sent the video.

 

Very interesting indeed. 

I am glad that our conversation has managed to illuminate such facts about Australian 'democracy' and 'freedom'. 

 

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2 hours ago, Ajay0 said:

You made allegations about the racist character of the Indian nation and I responded saying that both our present president and prime minister being of the lower castes.

 But you have not given the names of any native Australian or Indian-Australian prime ministers till date in the Australian nation.

The Indian-Australian community is the largest diaspora in Australia as well and the fastest growing too. So obviously, as a democratic nation the Indian-Australians must be given their due share in the governance.

Also the native Australians are facing increasingly higher discrimination levels as per research and statistics...

https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/campaigns/2015/08/why-saying-aborigine-isnt-ok-8-facts-about-indigenous-people-in-australia/

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/may/24/discrimination-against-indigenous-australians-has-risen-dramatically-survey-finds

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2023/10/6/as-vote-nears-horrific-racism-mars-australian-voice-referendum-campaign

Very interesting indeed. 

I am glad that our conversation has managed to illuminate such facts about Australian 'democracy' and 'freedom'. 

 

And as I've already explained to you several times we don't appoint our PM's on ethnicity, that's not how Democracy works.  Again, you are wrong with your Indian diaspora claim to be the largest. Chinese and other Europeans ethnic groups have larger communities like (British, Italians, Germans).

Your problem is you can't accept India has any problems and you want to compare others so it makes you feel better.  I just made a factual claim about disentry and you jumped in claiming Australia had a alcoholic problem which, as proven, wasn't true or at least not the worse and not as bad as India's. Instead of worrying about others, worry about India's poverty and pollution issues.

Since you linked Amnesty International about discrimination, here's what thay say about India. link

IN SUMMARY

With regard to the human rights situation on the ground, Amnesty International raises concern about freedom of
expression and assembly, human rights defenders, caste-based discrimination, right to health, right to privacy, religious
violence, arbitrary deprivation of nationality, indigenous peoples’ rights and women’s rights.

FOLLOW UP TO THE PREVIOUS REVIEW
1. Since the third Universal Periodic Review of India in 2017, there has been limited progress on the
recommendations supported by the government.
2. The government accepted recommendations on preventing discrimination and violence against women and girls,1
members of religious minorities,2 and Scheduled Castes (Dalits) and Scheduled Tribes (Adivasis)3. However, hate
crimes against marginalised communities have surged with impunity.4 The authorities have also failed to ensure
that cases of violence against women and girls are properly registered and investigated.
3. The government committed to carrying out independent investigations in all cases of attacks against journalists.5
However, human rights defenders including journalists have regularly come under attack and investigated under
anti-terror laws for being critical of the authorities.
4. The government agreed to strengthen efforts for the prevention of religious violence.6 Yet, religious differences
were amplified and deployed to create tensions amongst the public for electoral gains.

cont.

There is a total of 72 of these reviews!

 

 

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Posted (edited)
36 minutes ago, Black Red Devil said:

And as I've already explained to you several times we don't appoint our PM's on ethnicity, that's not how Democracy works.  Again, you are wrong with your Indian diaspora claim to be the largest. Chinese and other Europeans ethnic groups have larger communities like (British, Italians, Germans).

Well, that is what the Australian consul general Hilary McGeachy hersalf has to say.

https://www.mangaloretoday.com/main/-The-Indian-diaspora-is-the-second-largest-and-fast-growing-community-in-Australia-Australia-s-first-Consul-General.html

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The Indian community is Australia's second-largest and fastest-growing overseas group. The number of people in Australia with Indian heritage is around 976,000, against our total population of about 26 million, as per the 2021 census. The number is on a constant rise, so India is quite there with us.

 

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Your problem is you can't accept India has any problems and you want to compare others so it makes you feel better. 

I had admitted in my first post as well India's administrative reluctance to bring alcohol prohibition to all states in India and not just some . I had also mentioned India's shoddy administraive supervision of toxic alcohol sources. 

The comparisons between India and Australia were started by you here  and I only responded back . 

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I just made a factual claim about disentry and you jumped in claiming Australia had a alcoholic problem which, as proven, wasn't true or at least not the worse and not as bad as India's.

You made disparaging comments on India's dysentry that come up in monsoon and alcohol issues , and I responded back shedding light on the subject. You seem to be lacking general knowledge and awareness of many issues and I am just filling it out .

Edited by Ajay0
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Posted (edited)
On 6/29/2024 at 6:07 PM, Black Red Devil said:

  Probably because India, despite being one of the most racists and discriminating countries in the world with its caste system and despite having its huge poverty issues with $12.9% of the population living with less than $2.15 a day (Australia 0.5%), or even better, a massive 81.8% (which includes the 12.9%) living with less than $6.85 per day (Australia 1.0%)...

These stats only give a skewed understanding of reality. 

Indian economy is a combination of socialism and capitalism. A rupee in India can get much more in India rather than a dollar in the west due to the very low cost of living. 

Free or subsidised food rations, housing, healthcare and education, pensions for the widows and aged, means that you can get along a lot without much money.

Just by the food rations and healthcare, you can survive without money for years if needed. Just last week I helped an elderly person of 85 living alone, and without much means other than this government pensions and who cannot walk much due to bad knees, get his food rations from the ration shop. 

Most Indians are farmers as well and are self-sufficient in food production with their livestock. 

The cost of living is very cheap in India and you can get a lot with a few rupees. This is especially true in the rural areas.

 This is one of the reasons why many foreigners, especially from the west come to stay in India for long periods , due to the bankrupting high cost of living in their own countries.

Medical tourism conforming to foreign tourists as I mentioned earlier also rakes up billions of dollars each year, as the healthcare is cheaper in the west and does not punch a large hole in the wallet.

India is the fifth largest economy in the world and fastest growing economy in the world at the moment. 

Around 415 million people came out of poverty in India within 15 years between the years 2005/2006 and 2019/2021 as a consequence of this (as per UN statistics)

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/india/india-sees-415-million-people-coming-out-of-poverty-in-15-years-united-nations/articleshow/101658584.cms?from=mdr

In dollar terms, it has the third largest number of billionaires in the world (271) after the US and China, and the fourth largest number of centi-millionaires (1132) after the aforesaid two and Germany.  It is ranked 15th in the world in terms of dollar millionaires with around 796000. 

As the fastest growing economy in the world, it has replaced the UK as the fifth largest economy on earth, and is fast minting billionaires and millionaires each day at a fast pace. 

 It is now forecast to becoming the biggest economy in the world a few decades from now at its present growth rate, replacing the U.S. as well.

https://time.com/6297539/how-india-economy-will-surpass-us/

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/india-largest-economy-2052/articleshow/105576942.cms

https://www.indiatoday.in/business/story/india-to-overtake-us-worlds-second-largest-economy-goldman-sachs-report-2404721-2023-07-11

Edited by Ajay0
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