Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

The mystery of Linear B, Greece’s enigmatic script


Kittens Are Jerks

Recommended Posts

The mystery of Linear B, Greece’s enigmatic script

Linear B, the enigmatic script of ancient Greece used by the Mycenaean civilization, has long captivated the minds of experts and enthusiasts alike.

For decades, historians, linguists, and archaeologists have been debating over this fascinating writing system that dominated the Greek world thousands of years ago. Its discovery in the early 20th century in many different archaeological sites across Greece opened a new chapter in understanding the ancient Greek world.

https://greekreporter.com/2024/06/18/mystery-linear-b-greece-enigmatic-script/

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Related:

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Kittens Are Jerks

You often quote from or start new threads based on a Greek site.

But ... the Minoans were not Greek, or better, not Mycaenian.

These Minoans were of a different stock, and unrelated - or not much - to the Mycaenians and the much later Greeks.

But yes, Crete eventually became part of Greece.

But whatever the Minoans invented or started was only adopted by the later Mycaenians and Greeks.

I don't see that much in your threads.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

And I think the Mycaenians, or the later Greeks, owe a lot to Semitic influences.

Ebla, Assyria, and Phoenicians, all these Semites had a massive influence on the culture of the Greeks.

The Greeks have always been seen as the origin of 'Western Civilization'.

And the Greeks, up to this day, are proud of it.

But they should acknowledge, finally, that it wasn't thèm who ignited the start of the Western Civilization.

Edited by Abramelin
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Abramelin said:

You often quote from or start new threads based on a Greek site.

Yes, and will continue to do so.

22 hours ago, Abramelin said:

But ... the Minoans were not Greek, or better, not Mycaenian.

These Minoans were of a different stock, and unrelated - or not much - to the Mycaenians and the much later Greeks.

But yes, Crete eventually became part of Greece.

But whatever the Minoans invented or started was only adopted by the later Mycaenians and Greeks.

I don't see that much in your threads.

That tidbit of information is common knowledge. It's also known that Linear B was derived from Linear A.

22 hours ago, Abramelin said:

The Greeks have always been seen as the origin of 'Western Civilization'.

And the Greeks, up to this day, are proud of it.

But they should acknowledge, finally, that it wasn't thèm who ignited the start of the Western Civilization.

Imagine having the audacity to be proud of such a thing. Historians into complex historical facts instead of origin myths ought to scold them — severely. But seriously, who cares? I realise your issue has something to do with a perceived bias in the article posted, but there is nothing in it that is not factual.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

Imagine having the audacity to be proud of such a thing.

There's nothing wrong about being proud about something, unless it wasn't completely ones own thing.

 

15 minutes ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

I realise your issue has something to do with a perceived bias in the article posted, but there is nothing in it that is not factual.

It's all factual, I agree, but it lacks facts that seem conveniently left unadressed, unmentioned.

 

16 minutes ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

Historians into complex historical facts instead of origin myths ought to scold them — severely. But seriously, who cares?

I care, and many with me.

I've posted lots on UM about the Minoans, their culture, their language, their relations with cultures from the Middle East, how the Middle East influenced their culture, language, script, religion and so on.

But I've noticed a long time ago those influences were and are largely being ignored on Greek websites.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

There's nothing wrong about being proud about something, unless it wasn't completely ones own thing.

 

It's all factual, I agree, but it lacks facts that seem conveniently left unadressed, unmentioned.

 

I care, and many with me.

I've posted lots on UM about the Minoans, their culture, their language, their relations with cultures from the Middle East, how the Middle East influenced their culture, language, script, religion and so on.

But I've noticed a long time ago those influences were and are largely being ignored on Greek websites.

 

I've actually learned a decent bit on Minoan society and  influence that I never knew before,by you,piney,and a few others digging deeper into articles like this in the past.

I've read quite a bit about history,but still behind some of you guys.

To be fair,I don't think Kittens wrote the article 😄

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, CrimsonKing said:

To be fair,I don't think Kittens wrote the article 😄

Lol, she didn't. But she thinks it's a great site, and posts from it as though what she quotes from it has never been posted before om UM.

Most of what she posts using that site as source has been posted on UM before, and not only by me.

But with additional info you won't find on that site.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Abramelin said:

Lol, she didn't. But she thinks it's a great site, and posts from it as though what she quotes from it has never been posted before om UM.

Most of what she posts using that site as source has been posted on UM before, and not only by me.

But with additional info you won't find on that site.

Same/similar topics are constantly rehashed and discussed on this forum.

There is nothing wrong with posting more of the same with a similar or different perspective. If you have an issue with my sources report them, otherwise don't derail my topic threads with petty criticisms.

 

Edited by Kittens Are Jerks
Fixed formatting.
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

Same/similar topics are constantly rehashed and discussed on this forum.

There is nothing wrong with posting more of the same with a similar or different perspective. If you have an issue with my sources report them, otherwise don't derail my topic threads with petty criticisms.

 

Maybe I should add more smilies to my posts, < sigh >

🤥😉🦾

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/24/2024 at 12:39 PM, Abramelin said:

And I think the Mycaenians, or the later Greeks, owe a lot to Semitic influences.

Ebla, Assyria, and Phoenicians, all these Semites had a massive influence on the culture of the Greeks.

The Greeks have always been seen as the origin of 'Western Civilization'.

And the Greeks, up to this day, are proud of it.

But they should acknowledge, finally, that it wasn't thèm who ignited the start of the Western Civilization.

And I think the Semitic People learned about what they knew from the I.E. ancestors of the Hittites and Luwians.

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Piney said:

And I think the Semitic People learned about what they knew from the I.E. ancestors of the Hittites and Luwians.

 

 

But that has nothing to do with the 'Greeks', right?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 
2 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

But that has nothing to do with the 'Greeks', right?

The Greeks had the same common origin with them. But Minoan and Phoenician maritime tech was certainly a convergent. Or the Minoans gave it to the Phoenicians. At least that's what I think. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Piney said:

The Greeks had the same common origin with them. But Minoan and Phoenician maritime tech was certainly a convergent. Or the Minoans gave it to the Phoenicians. At least that's what I think. 

I think, considering the people from Byblos - a Phoenician city - traded with Egypt long before there even was something like a Minoan Civilization, that it went the other way round.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Abramelin said:

I think, considering the people from Byblos - a Phoenician city - traded with Egypt long before there even was something like a Minoan Civilization, that it went the other way round.

Like with Tartessos. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Piney said:

Like with Tartessos. 

Please explain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Abramelin said:

I think, considering the people from Byblos - a Phoenician city - traded with Egypt long before there even was something like a Minoan Civilization, that it went the other way round.

There was no doubt cross fertilization. But I don't think one was a bigger influence on the other and Greek weapons tech certainly didn't come from them 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Abramelin said:

Please explain.

I forgot the question matlrk...

A group of Phoenicians settled Spain, mixed with the locals and created a hybrid civilization.

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Piney said:

There was no doubt cross fertilization. But I don't think one was a bigger influence on the other and Greek weapons tech certainly didn't come from them 

I didn't say everything came from the Middle East, but a lot did.

We've had our discussions about those weapons before. The Tellamare People?

 

Piney, I once posted a series of photos of the Knossos Palace.

But I sneaked in a artistical representation of an Eblaitic temple venerating Astarte/Ishtar.

No one noticed.

Why? Because it looked exactly the same as the Knossos Palace, only some thousand years older.

  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Abramelin said:

Maybe I should add more smilies to my posts, < sigh >

An offensive statement does not come off as more affable when followed by a smiley. An insult is an insult.

What you should have done is not hijacked the discussion to begin with. This topic thread is about Linear B (the only thread on this forum dedicated to this particular subject), yet you turned it into what YOU wanted to discuss. What you did, and continue to do, is far from acceptable.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

An offensive statement does not come off as more affable when followed by a smiley. An insult is an insult.

What you should have done is not hijacked the discussion to begin with. This topic thread is about Linear B (the only thread on this forum dedicated to this particular subject), yet you turned it into what YOU wanted to discuss. What you did, and continue to do, is far from acceptable.

"Can't we all just get along"... Rodney King

Don't smack me Kittens 😆

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

An offensive statement does not come off as more affable when followed by a smiley. An insult is an insult.

Where did I insult you??

22 hours ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

What you should have done is not hijacked the discussion to begin with.

Without my interruption there wouldn't have been a discussion at all.

 

22 hours ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

This topic thread is about Linear B (the only thread on this forum dedicated to this particular subject), yet you turned it into what YOU wanted to discuss.

I know. And the script was borrowed/copied from Minoan Linear A.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.