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18 Historical Lies from American History You’ve Probably Accepted


Grim Reaper 6

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Although not many people understand why they have to know about the past, when you don’t learn about it, things tend to repeat themselves. History is not always objective. Some tales from the American history books are nothing more than that, tales. Some historical facts handed down through the years have nothing to do with the truth. They are more like folklore. These are 18 falsely believed untruths that you likely believe, too.

Go to the link for the 18 falsely believed untruths: 18 Historical Lies from American History You’ve Probably Accepted (msn.com) 

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Well this is a bunch of BS.  Several of those are rank speculation, others are poorly worded in way to misstate their assertion and the first one is just asinine.

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9 minutes ago, Oniomancer said:

Well this is a bunch of BS.  Several of those are rank speculation, others are poorly worded in way to misstate their assertion and the first one is just asinine.

Thanks for your comments I appreciate input!

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Posted (edited)

Declaration of Independence - Signed, Writer, Date | HISTORY

The Continental Congress reconvened on July 1, and the following day 12 of the 13 colonies adopted Lee’s resolution for independence. The process of consideration and revision of Jefferson’s declaration (including Adams’ and Franklin’s corrections) continued on July 3 and into the late morning of July 4, during which Congress deleted and revised some one-fifth of its text. The delegates made no changes to that key preamble, however, and the basic document remained Jefferson’s words. Congress officially adopted the Declaration of Independence later on the Fourth of July (though most historians now accept that the document was not signed until August 2).

On this day, the Declaration of Independence is officially signed - National Constitution Center

August 2, 1776, is one of the most important but least celebrated days in American history when 56 members of the Second Continental Congress started signing the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia.

Officially, the Congress declared its freedom from Great Britain on July 2, 1776, when it approved a resolution in a unanimous vote.

After voting on independence on July 2, the group needed to draft a document explaining the move to the public. It had been proposed in draft form by the Committee of Five (John Adams, Roger Sherman, Robert Livingston, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson) and it took two days for the Congress to agree on the edits. Thomas Jefferson was the main author.

Once the Congress approved the actual Declaration of Independence document on July 4, it was sent to a printer named John Dunlap. About 200 copies of the Dunlap Broadside were printed, with John Hancock’s name printed at the bottom. Today, 26 copies remain. Then on July 8, 1776, Colonel John Nixon of Philadelphia read a printed Declaration of Independence to the public for the first time on what is now called Independence Square.

Edited by susieice
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