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Spanish tourist trampled to death by elephants in South Africa


Still Waters

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A Spanish tourist has been trampled to death by elephants in a South African national park after apparently trying to take pictures of a breeding herd that included three calves.

The 43-year-old man was killed on Sunday morning at Pilanesberg national park about 130 miles (210km) north-west of Johannesburg.

According to park officials, the man, who was with three friends, climbed out of his vehicle and walked towards the animals to take photos.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/article/2024/jul/09/spanish-tourist-trampled-death-elephants-south-africa

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People really don't get that they are wild animals.   They are unpredictable and protective of their young.  Senseless death

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1 hour ago, glorybebe said:

People really don't get that they are wild animals.   They are unpredictable and protective of their young.  Senseless death

It also sounds like nearly everyone else who'd heard the same warnings from staff, tried to tell him to stop and he ignored them.  He didn't even have the excuse of being young and impulsive, he was 43.  I'm just glad the herd didn't take on the vehicles and hurt more of the tourists.

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 Imho, part of the fault lies with the guides who should have positioned the car at a safe distance or supervised the tourist properly to ensure his safety. They could have forced him in citing violation of rules and regulations with fines.

Vehicles with doors that do not open without the driver's control inputs would have also helped.

The loss of a customer due to lack of quality control measures is bound to impact their business or livelihood as well.

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The word "Park" is a Misnomer that should be corrected. It carries connotations of apparent safety for Westerners which are entirely incorrect in a wildlife preserve setting. In such a place, once you step outside your vehicle or go hiking, you become part of and subject to the natural laws of the ecosystem you are visiting.

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1 hour ago, Ajay0 said:


 Imho, part of the fault lies with the guides who should have positioned the car at a safe distance or supervised the tourist properly to ensure his safety. They could have forced him in citing violation of rules and regulations with fines.

Vehicles with doors that do not open without the driver's control inputs would have also helped.

The loss of a customer due to lack of quality control measures is bound to impact their business or livelihood as well.

I don't think he was with guides.  Sounds like he and his buddies were out driving along the roads.

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2 hours ago, Kenemet said:

I don't think he was with guides.  Sounds like he and his buddies were out driving along the roads.

If that is the case, it would be a case of lack of due diligence and due discretion on his part that lead to the said disaster. He should have made a study and risk assessment of the dangers he might face in the wildlife of the country he was visiting.

It is important to maintain caution and situational awareness in the midst of wildlife.

Even with trained and experienced guides such safaris have an element of danger as shown by the deaths of two American tourists this year in Zambia during a safari tour.

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