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Does Megalodon Still exist?


Invisigoth

Is Meg still swimming the sea's?  

214 members have voted

  1. 1. Is Meg still swimming the sea's?

    • yes
      105
    • no
      109


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OMG I remember that now! I watched it with my Buffy-obsessed friend! It's pretty scary for such a camp show!

Buffy wasn't camp. It was one of the best tv shows ever produced.

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Nope, these animals would not have had a problem with cold water, like other members of the family it was most likely regionally endothermic (it uses a counter current of blood vessels to keep its body temperature higher than the water temperature). You'll see that all its major relatives are cold water species.

Nope, deep water animals are almost always extremely small, even the giant squid are not really very deep. Next to nothing to eat in deep water because there is no primary production.

we cant really use the "other members of the family" defence i mean we have never seen a Meg and have no clue how it functions in comparison to other sharks, we can only assume...as for the deep, we dont know what else is down there...we only know less than 10% of the ocean, who are we to say there arent areas in the ocean we havent searched or discovered, that very large sea creatures inhabit, including the megalodon...we cant reply with anything like "oh but the meg was usually in warm shore-type areas despite people saying they did because quite simply we DONT KNOW the whole ocean, yes they could have been around the shore but also out in the open...

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You also can't say with certainty how much food there may or may not be in the deepest parts of the ocean, consider the worms and molluscs they found living around sulfur vents at depths where no sunlight penetrates at all, prior to their discovery I would wager that many people including yourself mattshark might have argued that there wouldn't be such life in those areas and couldn't have predicted their evolution around the sulfur vents.

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we cant really use the "other members of the family" defence i mean we have never seen a Meg and have no clue how it functions in comparison to other sharks, we can only assume...as for the deep, we dont know what else is down there...we only know less than 10% of the ocean, who are we to say there arent areas in the ocean we havent searched or discovered, that very large sea creatures inhabit, including the megalodon...we cant reply with anything like "oh but the meg was usually in warm shore-type areas despite people saying they did because quite simply we DONT KNOW the whole ocean, yes they could have been around the shore but also out in the open...

We know a lot more than you imagine. There simply is no food in deep water. There is no primary production to support such a large animal. Not only that the pressure is enormous. Far too high for any animal that large. We know what the realms of possibility are. We may not have explored the whole ocean but if you think that a chance of a large, cetacean eating coastal dwelling shallow water shark down there you are very much mistaken. And the extant family members are in fact an excellent guide. No reason to think it was a warm water shark at all. It was almost certainly a temperate water species (like whites, makos, porbeagle and salmon sharks).

Oh and we do know it was a shallow water species from where the teeth are found. That means it also ate in shallow waters as this is the main method by which sharks lose teeth.

You can say we don't know all you like, but we know a good deal.

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You also can't say with certainty how much food there may or may not be in the deepest parts of the ocean, consider the worms and molluscs they found living around sulfur vents at depths where no sunlight penetrates at all, prior to their discovery I would wager that many people including yourself mattshark might have argued that there wouldn't be such life in those areas and couldn't have predicted their evolution around the sulfur vents.

The thing is these animals are small and we did know about sulphur based primary production from other volcanic environments. These vents are temporary and unstable. It is rare that they last 10 years. Also pressure - far too high for an animal that large and before you even mention giant squid, not even close to being that deep. Sorry but the argument is a complete none starter and has a basis in a lack of knowledge of marine biology.

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The thing is these animals are small and we did know about sulphur based primary production from other volcanic environments. These vents are temporary and unstable. It is rare that they last 10 years. Also pressure - far too high for an animal that large and before you even mention giant squid, not even close to being that deep. Sorry but the argument is a complete none starter and has a basis in a lack of knowledge of marine biology.

I guess i just got served.

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I guess i just got served.

Boo ya! :w00t:

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They've just found 1000 new species in and around unexplored areas of Vietnam havent they? and they're on land....

If we can do that.. whos to say we don't still have some unseen creatures in the ocean?

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They've just found 1000 new species in and around unexplored areas of Vietnam havent they? and they're on land....

If we can do that.. whos to say we don't still have some unseen creatures in the ocean?

There are most certainly undiscovered species in the ocean however, a living megalodon is different in that there would be many signs of such a large carnivore existing in today's waters. Things like fresh teeth being found or half eaten whale carcasses washing ashore etc. etc. :tu:

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Im also just thining it doesent have to be in DEEP waters, just unexplored ocean on the surface...we can say it was a shallow water shark because of where teeth are found but that just means that they have also been shallow at some point...we see normal fish at shallow water, but they also live and exist out in the open, places we havent explored

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They've just found 1000 new species in and around unexplored areas of Vietnam havent they? and they're on land....

If we can do that.. whos to say we don't still have some unseen creatures in the ocean?

Unseen and unknown creatures to megalodon is quite a jump.

HN

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Im also just thining it doesent have to be in DEEP waters, just unexplored ocean on the surface...we can say it was a shallow water shark because of where teeth are found but that just means that they have also been shallow at some point...we see normal fish at shallow water, but they also live and exist out in the open, places we havent explored

It is basic physiology, it is simply impossible.

Deep water = very high pressure and no primary production. It is not possible for an animal that large to live in terms of both pressure and food supply. This is not my opinion it is a fact.

Basic marine science will show you this. It is not possible.

The open ocean is pretty much empty there is bugger all there. You are very wrong about this.

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Unseen and unknown creatures to megalodon is quite a jump.

HN

Yep and that was over a decade and importantly most where really small.

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It is basic physiology, it is simply impossible.

Deep water = very high pressure and no primary production. It is not possible for an animal that large to live in terms of both pressure and food supply. This is not my opinion it is a fact.

Basic marine science will show you this. It is not possible.

The open ocean is pretty much empty there is bugger all there. You are very wrong about this.

no dude you dont get what im saying, unexplored waters...how the hell can we know there is nothing there if its UNEXPLORED?

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It is basic physiology, it is simply impossible.

Deep water = very high pressure and no primary production. It is not possible for an animal that large to live in terms of both pressure and food supply. This is not my opinion it is a fact.

Basic marine science will show you this. It is not possible.

The open ocean is pretty much empty there is bugger all there. You are very wrong about this.

You can't say that because Sperm whales hunt that deep for giant squid. They stay down there for a long time, but they don't live there.

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Buffy wasn't camp. It was one of the best tv shows ever produced.

Mattshark, I may not word this as memorably as I would have liked but: WTF MAN?

Clearly you havn't seen a single good episode of X-Files ;)

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no dude you dont get what im saying, unexplored waters...how the hell can we know there is nothing there if its UNEXPLORED?

Yes we can it is a mixture between basic physiology and physics.

You can't say that because Sperm whales hunt that deep for giant squid. They stay down there for a long time, but they don't live there.

They don't go that deep relatively nor do giant squid. Secondly that is a sperm whale, not megalodon. Megalodon was a shallow water coastal predator feeding on whales.

Mattshark, I may not word this as memorably as I would have liked but: WTF MAN?

Clearly you havn't seen a single good episode of X-Files ;)

Hated X-files! Buffy didn't take its self seriously and had a very English sense of humour.

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If you don't mind me asking mattshark how old are you? i wouldn't have guessed you were young enough to even know what buffy is.

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Hated X-files! Buffy didn't take its self seriously and had a very English sense of humour.

No, just no. Buffy wasn't intelligentally lighthearted, it was just light hearted AND unintelligent. XFiles managed to master interesting characters, love triangles, emotional dillema's within serious or light hearted themes. Both were managed masterfully.

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No, just no. Buffy wasn't intelligentally lighthearted, it was just light hearted AND unintelligent. XFiles managed to master interesting characters, love triangles, emotional dillema's within serious or light hearted themes. Both were managed masterfully.

And Scully stripped down to her Reg Grundies. :w00t:

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If you don't mind me asking mattshark how old are you? i wouldn't have guessed you were young enough to even know what buffy is.

I'm 28. I was 16 when Buffy first aired.

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No, just no. Buffy wasn't intelligentally lighthearted, it was just light hearted AND unintelligent. XFiles managed to master interesting characters, love triangles, emotional dillema's within serious or light hearted themes. Both were managed masterfully.

I have to disagree, Buffy was very clever and very well written. Especially from the second season onwards. Plus it had great music.

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And Scully stripped down to her Reg Grundies. :w00t:

:huh:

Dude...

she fit a B-Cup.

I only do D and over :lol:

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  • 3 months later...
Well, I think it sure is possible that it still exists.

But I got a question. A couple of months ago I read an article about Japanese research. They dropped a container into a ocean trench. This container was filled with food and rigged with a motion activated camera.

In one of the shots made by the camera, they saw a huge shadow of some kind of fish (or whale). As far a I recall the sharks eating the bait in the container al swiftly left the container as soon as the shadow came into the picture.

This shadow was estimated to belong to a 60m long animal.

Can anyone point me to this article again? And to other articles about follow-ups on this research? I like to know what's going on.

These kind of things surely make one believe megalodon is still out there. It's a big ocean and we're very small.

Hi, was wondering if you can post a link to this "article" it sounds really interesting

thank you, i know this was posted A LONG time back but was wondering if anyone has any information/link on this particular article N-droe is talking about

thx in advance

Swarsh

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