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Kuahji

India, U.S. agree to nuclear pact

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Kuahji

NEW DELHI, India (CNN) -- India and the United States have sealed a landmark nuclear agreement during U.S. President George W. Bush's visit to the world's largest democracy.

"We have concluded an historic agreement today on nuclear power," Bush told a news conference with Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in New Delhi on Thursday.

The pact calls for the United States to provide expertise and fuel, and for India to open its civilian projects to international inspectors.

In just seven years, the nuclear issue -- once the single largest irritant in India-U.S. relations -- is now the centerpiece of what both countries describe as a "strategic partnership."

The deal still requires approval from the U.S. Congress, where skeptical lawmakers have complained it could undermine the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty by letting India bypass it.

The pact comes as Bush tries to reduce his country's dependence on fossil fuels, and as India's booming economy needs more power to fuel its growth.

India is emerging as an economic powerhouse, with its gross domestic product (GDP) forecast to grow at 8.1 percent in 2006 and its stock market trading at record highs.

Aware that a growing India can buy even more goods, and facing his lowest ever approval ratings at home, Bush is anxious to help.

But many Indian scientists and others in the nuclear establishment fear it will erode India's military ambitions.

Aware of their concerns, Singh has pleaded for their support.

"There has been no erosion of the integrity of our nuclear doctrine either in terms of current or future capabilities," he said earlier.

Despite the potential political fallout from the deal, both sides have much to gain, one analyst said.

"The essence of this strategic partnership is to provide a countervailing influence to China ... to act as a restraint on the exercise of Chinese power," security analyst Brahma Chellaney told CNN.

China on Thursday was quick to respond.

Any pact "must meet the requirements and provisions of the nuclear nonproliferation regime and the obligations undertaken by all countries concerned," The Associated Press quoted Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang as saying.

Blasts mar trip

As Bush visited India on day two of his South Asia trip, blasts killed at least four people near the U.S. Consulate in the Pakistani city of Karachi, police said. (Full story)

Bush is set to travel to Pakistan on Saturday. On Thursday, Bush underscored his support for that country, a key U.S. ally in the fight against terrorism. (See the Bush itinerary)

"Terrorists and killers are not going to prevent me from going to Pakistan," Bush said.

One U.S. citizen -- a foreign service officer -- was among those killed in the bombings, Bush said.

Despite their alliance, many in Washington want to see Islamabad make stronger efforts to dismantle terrorist training camps.

Bush said he would talk to Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf about reports of militants crossing the Pakistan-Afghanistan border.

"These infiltrations are causing harm to friends, allies, and cause harm to U.S. troops," Bush said. "It's an ongoing topic of conversation."

Bush arrived in the Indian capital New Delhi on Wednesday after a surprise visit to Afghanistan, where thousands of U.S. troops have been based since helping oust the Taliban regime following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. (Full story)

Ongoing protests against Bush's India visit reflect the nation's mixed feelings about the United States -- a country seen as a loyal friend by some and a global bully by others.

On Wednesday, nearly 150,000 protesters, most of them Muslims, demonstrated in New Delhi. However, only a few thousand protesters -- a mix of social and environmental groups -- took part in Thursday's demonstrations.

"Bush is a killer," one sign read. Security was extremely tight throughout the city, with roads cordoned off and police out in strong numbers.

Found here http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/asiapcf/03/0...isit/index.html

I think it's a great deal for both the US & India :yes:. Finally, something I approve of Bush doing.

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Fluffybunny

Yeah, that is a good thing, I am glad that bush and his team could pull this together...it helps to set a standard of getting the nuclear problem under control. Hopefully someday we can get a away from anyone having nukes, but that will be some time down the road. This is a move in the right direction.

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et's daddy

ABC News today said this deal would help lower oil prices for the entire world

gee and here id swear many of you told me Bush was just in it for the oil money

there isnt enough crow in the world for you people to eat right now

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Rykster

Sorry Fluffy, but I don't see the nuclear genie ever going back into the bottle, until we find an even more horrific weapon to supplant it.

Am I the only one whoose ears have perked up at a stronger alliance with India, and perhaps Pakistan, when were are at a very nasty stand off with Iran?

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et's daddy

it actually sorta surprises me how those that claimed Bush was all about the oil money seem to be avoiding it now

:hmm:

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Kuahji

it actually sorta surprises me how those that claimed Bush was all about the oil money seem to be avoiding it now

:hmm:

I haven't seen any of them come into this thread yet...

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Fluffybunny

Sorry Fluffy, but I don't see the nuclear genie ever going back into the bottle, until we find an even more horrific weapon to supplant it.

Am I the only one whoose ears have perked up at a stronger alliance with India, and perhaps Pakistan, when were are at a very nasty stand off with Iran?

I understand what you are saying, but I do think that if the entire world gets together it can make a dent on the future production of weapons. The huge stockpiles of weapons that were developed in the 60's are eventually going to go out of service and no longer able to be deployed.

Will there always be nukes? always is a long time, and no one knows the future. Can the number of nukes in the world can be decreased? yes, over time. I think that if one terrorist set off a nuke in a populated city the world would work much harder at stopping people from producing nukes...

At this point it isn't much of a threat since no one has nuked anything since tests of the 60's, and the bombing of Japan at the end of WWII.

Once the world decides no one should have them, there will be plenty of effort to stop the development. When an entire world wants to stop a country from doing something, it can make it happen. Isolating a country financially has a huge impact on economies and the ability to make nukes.

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