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Thanato

'Truth, duty, valour' described

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Thanato

'Truth, duty, valour' described fallen Canadian soldier

Canada is divided into those who knew Capt. Nichola Goddard and those who wish they had known the slain Canadian soldier, her father said Friday during a moving tribute to his daughter.

Tim Goddard delivered his emotional eulogy to friends, family and soldiers gathered at St. Barnabas Anglican Church in Calgary.

Nichola Goddard, 26, was serving as a forward artillery observer in Kandahar when she was killed on May 17 in a firefight with Taliban insurgents.

Her father said his daughter lived life through the motto of the Royal Military College: "Truth, Duty, Valour."

"She was a ball of energy, packing everything in," he said. "She was a Care Bear of the heart."

In a eulogy that drew laughter from people inside the church, her husband, Jason Beam, recalled their first conversation. "She introduced herself as Goddard and I said, 'I'm Beam.'

"I never thought that two-second conversation would develop into the fabulous relationship we had," he said.

"I'm going to miss your smile, your laugh and your company. But mostly I'm going to miss having my best friend to share life with."

Goddard's commanding officer in the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, the unit she served with in Shilo, Man., before her deployment to Afghanistan, described her as an outstanding soldier with "tireless passion."

"Nic, end of mission. Stand easy," said Maj. L.M. McGarry.

Father criticizes privacy policy

Tim Goddard took aim at Prime Minister Stephen Harper's decision to ban the media from covering the arrivals of military coffins to Canada.

Harper says the decision was made to protect the privacy of families in mourning.

"I find it troubling the privacy decision means keeping the press outside the wire where the bad guys are," said Tim Goddard. "I would like to think Nic died to protect our freedoms, not restrict them."

Speaking Friday in Victoria, B.C., the prime minister said he was troubled to hear Tim Goddard's comments. Harper said he has given "fairly clear instructions" that families be consulted about whether media should be present when bodies arrive in Canada.

"Obviously I'll look into it and find out if the family wishes were different than what was done," he said.

The family requested the funeral be public and set up speakers outside the Calgary church for people to listen to the ceremony.

Scholarship in Goddard's name

Her father also announced a memorial scholarship at the University of Calgary for students from Papua New Guinea or Afghanistan, or First Nations, Inuit or Métis people.

Goddard was born in Papua New Guinea, raised in First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities, and died in Afghanistan, her father said.

The university will match the family's donations, he said.

Goddard died after Canadian soldiers had been called in to support Afghan troops fighting insurgents in the Panjwai region, about 24 kilometres west of Kandahar. She was riding in a light armoured vehicle that was hit by rocket-propelled grenades.

Her final resting place will be the National Memorial Cemetery in Ottawa, where she is likely to be interred early next month.

The first female Canadian combat soldier to die in action, Goddard was the 16th Canadian soldier to die in Afghanistan since 2002. A Canadian diplomat has also been killed.

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~Thanato

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kaknelson

'Truth, duty, valour' described fallen Canadian soldier

Canada is divided into those who knew Capt. Nichola Goddard and those who wish they had known the slain Canadian soldier, her father said Friday during a moving tribute to his daughter.

Tim Goddard delivered his emotional eulogy to friends, family and soldiers gathered at St. Barnabas Anglican Church in Calgary.

Nichola Goddard, 26, was serving as a forward artillery observer in Kandahar when she was killed on May 17 in a firefight with Taliban insurgents.

Her father said his daughter lived life through the motto of the Royal Military College: "Truth, Duty, Valour."

"She was a ball of energy, packing everything in," he said. "She was a Care Bear of the heart."

In a eulogy that drew laughter from people inside the church, her husband, Jason Beam, recalled their first conversation. "She introduced herself as Goddard and I said, 'I'm Beam.'

"I never thought that two-second conversation would develop into the fabulous relationship we had," he said.

"I'm going to miss your smile, your laugh and your company. But mostly I'm going to miss having my best friend to share life with."

Goddard's commanding officer in the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, the unit she served with in Shilo, Man., before her deployment to Afghanistan, described her as an outstanding soldier with "tireless passion."

"Nic, end of mission. Stand easy," said Maj. L.M. McGarry.

Father criticizes privacy policy

Tim Goddard took aim at Prime Minister Stephen Harper's decision to ban the media from covering the arrivals of military coffins to Canada.

Harper says the decision was made to protect the privacy of families in mourning.

"I find it troubling the privacy decision means keeping the press outside the wire where the bad guys are," said Tim Goddard. "I would like to think Nic died to protect our freedoms, not restrict them."

Speaking Friday in Victoria, B.C., the prime minister said he was troubled to hear Tim Goddard's comments. Harper said he has given "fairly clear instructions" that families be consulted about whether media should be present when bodies arrive in Canada.

"Obviously I'll look into it and find out if the family wishes were different than what was done," he said.

The family requested the funeral be public and set up speakers outside the Calgary church for people to listen to the ceremony.

Scholarship in Goddard's name

Her father also announced a memorial scholarship at the University of Calgary for students from Papua New Guinea or Afghanistan, or First Nations, Inuit or Métis people.

Goddard was born in Papua New Guinea, raised in First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities, and died in Afghanistan, her father said.

The university will match the family's donations, he said.

Goddard died after Canadian soldiers had been called in to support Afghan troops fighting insurgents in the Panjwai region, about 24 kilometres west of Kandahar. She was riding in a light armoured vehicle that was hit by rocket-propelled grenades.

Her final resting place will be the National Memorial Cemetery in Ottawa, where she is likely to be interred early next month.

The first female Canadian combat soldier to die in action, Goddard was the 16th Canadian soldier to die in Afghanistan since 2002. A Canadian diplomat has also been killed.

Source

user posted image

user posted image

~Thanato

Nice rememberance Thanato. :)

RIP. Nichola Goddard. Lest we forget the fallen in the line of fire.

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