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3000-yr-old "pyramid" discovered in China


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Posted (IP: Staff) ·
Image credit: stockxpert
Image credit: stockxpert
Chinese archaeologists have discovered a group of ancient tombs shaped like pyramids, dating back at least 3,000 years, in Jiaohe City of northeast China's Jilin Province. The tombs, covering an area of 500,000 square meters (1,000 meters long and 500 meters wide), were found after water erosion exposed part of a mountain, revealing two of the tombs.

news icon View: Full Article | Source: Xinhuanet.com
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user posted imageChinese archaeologists have discovered a group of ancient tombs shaped like pyramids, dating back at least 3,000 years, in Jiaohe City of northeast China's Jilin Province. The tombs, covering an area of 500,000 square meters (1,000 meters long and 500 meters wide), were found after water erosion exposed part of a mountain, revealing two of the tombs. Six smaller tombs had eroded away leaving no indications of their original scale and appearance, but the biggest tomb, located on the south side of the mountain, could clearly be discerned as a pyramid shape with three layers from bottom to top. The pyramid's square bottom is about 50 meters long and 30 meters wide, about the size of a basketball court, with an oval platform on the top, about 15 meters long and 10 meters wide. The tomb was made of stone and earth dug out from the hill. A stone coffin, surrounded by four screen boards and covered by a granite top, was placed on the top platform. The coffin appeared to belong to the king of an early tribe based on the dimensions of the site, according to experts with the Jiaohe Archaeological Research Institute.

The tombs are part of the Xituanshan cultural ruins site, which dates back 3,000 years to China's Bronze Age period. The ruins were excavated in Jilin in 1950. A lot of ancient hunting and domestic tools, including a stone knife and axe, as well as bronzeware and earthenware, have been unearthed from the stone coffin and other six smaller graves. The discovery will provide valuable clues on study of ancient funeral customs and the tomb structure and culture of ethnic groups in the area.

user posted image View: Full Article | Source: Xinhuanet.com

Quite a lot of pyramids being found of late. wonder should i be getting worried. any pics relating to the story.

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Quite a lot of pyramids being found of late. wonder should i be getting worried. any pics relating to the story.

I'm very interested in seeing someone piece all of these pyramid findings together. It's just another step towards proving how mankind spread and communicated throughout the antediluvian/postdiluvian age and how culture may be more universal than we think. does anyone know of such studies being done?

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Quite a lot of pyramids being found of late. wonder should i be getting worried. any pics relating to the story.

I'll start digging my backyard. Maybe I will find a pyramid too :w00t:

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  • 1 year later...

http://www.beforeus.com/

THE BIGGEST PYRAMID: One hundred pyramids have been discovered in Shensi Province of China. The largest – according to one claim 1,200 feet high, 2½ times the height of Egypt’s Great Pyramid – could, if hollow, swallow 26 Empire State buildings!
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