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40 new species found in Amazon 'lost world'

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news icon rUp to 40 new species of plants and animals, including a bird and a tree rat, have been discovered in an expedition to one of the world’s last unspoilt wildernesses. Scientists risked their lives to make the discoveries and three of them almost ended up being eaten by the wildlife they were trying to record.

Two of the team exploring the Amapá region of Brazil had to hide in a hollow tree all night as a prowling jaguar tried to find a way in, and a third had to flee a hungry cayman.

news icon View: Full Article | Source: Times Online

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jesspy

its good to see that we are finding new spieces but we are still losing others at an alarming rate. But still if we are still able to find new species today its pretty good. It goes to show how little the earh has been explored

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Ghost Ship

Its awesome to hear this news. I envy the people who first steped foot into those parts.

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RollingThunder06

It is neat and sad at the same time. Seems man has the ability to ruin things he finds. They have already taken specimens out of their natural surroundings and into cages and labs.

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SG7

Can any one find some pics.

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DeathKnight
:w00t: can someone post the pictures as soon as they are up or is it time for me to NINJA some pics :ph34r: ? i cant wait to see these pics :yes:

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:PsYKoTiC:BeHAvIoR:

It is neat and sad at the same time. Seems man has the ability to ruin things he finds. They have already taken specimens out of their natural surroundings and into cages and labs.

Caging and stripping freedom from a living creature is horrible. :no: I just hope the scientists will treat their specimens with love and respect.

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Lone_wolf_eyes

I heard about this on the news. :D I think its really good that we are finding new animals (and if anyone has a link where there might be pictures of some of these animals please message me). Like stated above in the first reply, we are finding new species and losing old ones which is kinda sad. <_< But I personally think these new species are now already on a path of destruction just by being discovered. Soon that area will become a tourist attraction, begin growing and BAM! :gun: The forest is gone, the animals are decreasing and WWF has more on their plate then donations can handle. :cry: Sad really. Humans should :bow: bow down to animals instead of using them. <_< They give us enough already yet we continue to abuse them and use them for our entertainment. :angry::td:

--= We go to zoos to view animals in their "natural habitat". There's just something about these 'natural habitats'. The restricted area seems to take away the 'wild, natural' part of it. =--

user posted image

I can see the difference...Can you? SAVE ZOO ANIMALS!!!

user posted image

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QueenOftheCramped

and i bring to you...pictures!!

Sweetheart, these are from Indonesia & New Guinea, not the Amazon, where the article refers to...

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Aztec Warrior

I believe they forgot to mention the spiders Leticia Avilés and, Anelosimus eximius, which live in large colonies and grow to as much as 2 meter across. They are carnivorous and highly venomous, know to consume humans.

Eh, I could be wrong about that, the chief elder tells me.

Edited by Aztec Warrior

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Raptor

I believe they forgot to mention the spiders Leticia Avilés and, Anelosimus eximius, which live in large colonies and grow to as much as 2 meter across. They are carnivorous and highly venomous, know to consume humans.

Eh, I could be wrong about that, the chief elder tells me.

The spiderweb is 2 metres across. The spiders themselves are not particularly large at all.

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Aztec Warrior

That's what i meant. But they still have that poison. Then they partially eat and lay their eggs inside the dead prey, which in turn consume their way out.

Village elder says I exaggerate.

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evancj

It always warms my heart to know that there are places on this earth where people have not tread on or trampled over. But I can’t help but wonder how long it will be before we systematically destroy these new habitats. The very discovery of these rare and sensitive species puts their lives at risk. I can’t help but wonder how many plant, insect, and animal species have gone extinct with out our knowledge, and of those how many held secrets such as cures for diseases, or agricultural solutions to world hunger.

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Roj47
[more are contained among the thousands of specimens brought back for analysis. Besides the rat and the bird, the new species found include seven fish, eight frogs, lizards and snakes, two shrimps and eight plants. One species of lizard, Amapafaurus petrabactulus, was rediscovered having been seen only twice before, both times in 1970. The lizard is unusual in having four fingers on its claws, whereas it closest relative has three.

Here's hoping that they did not bring back the only 4 fingered lizards that were free. Maybe it will be over 25 years until the next sightings.

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